Diablo® III

canem mortuum liber - Latin

I am wondering exactly what this phrase is supposed to be in Latin.

"dead dog" is in Latin, but in the accusative case.

liber could be "free" in which case it would be nominative singular masculine, and not agree with dog.

Or it could be "book" but without a verb, the phrase seems odd. "Book dead dog" since dead dog cannot be genitive (the book of the dead dog).

Am I missing something obvious here?
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Liber is also a Roman god (same as the Greek Dionysus) Not that it helps much :)

I suppose, Liber as adjective would give more meaning.

I'll admit, I am in deep water here (not native speaker hehe) so sort of just throwing things at you :)
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Well that use of "Liber" is "the free one," which would make it a substantive adjective, but that would not alleviate the grammatical case of it.

Even if I define all the words, I don't see how they fit together grammatically.
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01/17/2014 10:50 AMPosted by Ensgnblack
Well that use of "Liber" is "the free one," which would make it a substantive adjective, but that would not alleviate the grammatical case of it.

Even if I define all the words, I don't see how they fit together grammatically.


Probably some designer who thought, "lets just name it something latin, all knows latin sounds cool and nobody knows what it means anyways!"

:o)
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Sounds like it means

The dog has been dead for a long time or extended period.

Canem = A dog

Mortuum/Mortuus = Dead

Liber = The free one

I take it to mean, that the dog has already died, and has been dead for some time.


But liber is nominative (the subject) and canem is accusative (the direct object). The two words cannot grammatically go together. Using the words that way also leaves us without a verb, making the subject/direct object relationship odd. We also cannot imply the berb "to be" and make it something like "the free one is a dead dog" because "to be" is intransitive and would take a predicate nominative.
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Maybe they were aiming for something like 'The only free dog is a dead one', in the sense that nobody is truly free.
Edited by ReLiC#2108 on 1/17/2014 11:11 AM PST
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What is the context here? Where does this appear in the game?
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01/17/2014 11:04 AMPosted by Ensgnblack
Sounds like it means

The dog has been dead for a long time or extended period.

Canem = A dog

Mortuum/Mortuus = Dead

Liber = The free one

I take it to mean, that the dog has already died, and has been dead for some time.


But liber is nominative (the subject) and canem is accusative (the direct object). The two words cannot grammatically go together. Using the words that way also leaves us without a verb, making the subject/direct object relationship odd. We also cannot imply the berb "to be" and make it something like "the free one is a dead dog" because "to be" is intransitive and would take a predicate nominative.


They have probably just translated something from english by looking up each single word, without concern for grammar. Something along the lines of "The dead dog is free" If they look up "dead", "dog" and "free" individually, they would probably come up close to what they named it.

I don't speak latin, so I have zero clue on how the grammar works I might add. Had it been danish, I would have been on my own turf here :)
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Some latin phrases are not to be traslated word by word. This one is pretty much something like:

The dead dog roams free again

Simple as that, I hope I dont get quoted by a Latin language expert haha
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100 Undead Priest
10165
01/17/2014 11:12 AMPosted by Funkgrenade
What is the context here? Where does this appear in the game?


I'm probably wrong, but I think it has something to do with Witch Doctor's, and Zombie Dogs?

\/\/\/\/\/

Ahh, ok
Edited by Shrew#1302 on 1/17/2014 11:49 AM PST
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MVP - Technical Support
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01/17/2014 11:39 AMPosted by Shrew
What is the context here? Where does this appear in the game?


I'm probably wrong, but I think it has something to do with Witch Doctor's, and Zombie Dogs?


It is the in game item that gives you the spectral hound pet from the Digital Deluxe Edition.
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100 Night Elf Hunter
10265
01/17/2014 11:36 AMPosted by ZaPLaS
Some latin phrases are not to be traslated word by word. This one is pretty much something like:

The dead dog roams free again

Simple as that, I hope I dont get quoted by a Latin language expert haha


Yep. Idioms do not translate well word for word. For instance, translate "it came from out of the blue" into a foreign language word for word, and the speakers of that language would probably wonder how could anything emerge from a color. At least those who don't speak idiomatic American English.

It's probably the same with this Latin phrase.
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01/17/2014 11:36 AMPosted by ZaPLaS
Some latin phrases are not to be traslated word by word. This one is pretty much something like:

The dead dog roams free again

Simple as that, I hope I dont get quoted by a Latin language expert haha


Where do you get the verb "roams"? One can supply verbs at times in Latin when the yare not given, but usually it is the verb "to be."

Also this cannot be the case because "dead dog" cannot be the subject. That would like like canis mortuus; here instead we have the direct object, so it must receive the action of the verb. SO your translation doesn't work.
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01/17/2014 12:23 PMPosted by Ryaskybird
Some latin phrases are not to be traslated word by word. This one is pretty much something like:

The dead dog roams free again

Simple as that, I hope I dont get quoted by a Latin language expert haha


Yep. Idioms do not translate well word for word. For instance, translate "it came from out of the blue" into a foreign language word for word, and the speakers of that language would probably wonder how could anything emerge from a color. At least those who don't speak idiomatic American English.

It's probably the same with this Latin phrase.


While true, this should come out to something grammatically, regardless of making sense. The problem here is that the phrase does not work grammatically, unless I am missing something about it.

- There is no verb, or the verb (liber could be from liberare) is the wrong form for anything.
- The two words mortuum and canem go together, but cannot go with (agree with, in grammar) with liber.
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Where do you get the verb "roams"? One can supply verbs at times in Latin when the yare not given, but usually it is the verb "to be."

Also this cannot be the case because "dead dog" cannot be the subject. That would like like canis mortuus; here instead we have the direct object, so it must receive the action of the verb. SO your translation doesn't work.


I know plenty of latin phrases, here's an example: about Sir. Isaac Newton

'Qui genus humanum ingenio superavit'

if you translate it

'in intellect he surpassed the human race'

but a loosely translation is

'Of all humans, there is no greater intellect'

you just cannot traslate 'canem mortuum liber' word by word and expect it to make any sense. That's not how it works my friend.

I'm 99% sure the loosely translation is "the dead dog roams free again" ( spectral hound?, liber? just common sense applied here )

----

here's another one:

"Ad astra per aspera"

"Through hardships to the stars"

or more loose

"A rough road leads to the stars"

dont tell me: where did they get 'road" or "leads" from?, again, that's not how it works

u need to do a little more research

cheers

EDIT. If someone studied languages and can point my errors. I would appreciate that
Edited by ZaPLaS#1243 on 1/17/2014 1:55 PM PST
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Some latin phrases are not to be traslated word by word. This one is pretty much something like:

The dead dog roams free again

Simple as that, I hope I dont get quoted by a Latin language expert haha


Yep. Idioms do not translate well word for word. For instance, translate "it came from out of the blue" into a foreign language word for word, and the speakers of that language would probably wonder how could anything emerge from a color. At least those who don't speak idiomatic American English.

It's probably the same with this Latin phrase.


"it came from out of the blue" you could translate in danish (my native language) and it would mean the same word for word. I have no idea if we share US/UK idioms, I would think so, since danish and english have influenced each other. Vikings brought Nordic to England, and in turn took some words with them back home. There are many words with similarities in english / Nordic (especially danish)

Hound = Hund
Egg = Æg
Land = Land (may also mean country in danish defined by context)
swimming = svømmer
conflict = konflikt
long = lang (longing however, would be længsel in danish)

"it came from out of the blue"
"det kom ud af det blå"

And a great deal of others as well :)
Edited by KingD#2483 on 1/17/2014 1:34 PM PST
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