Diablo® III

canem mortuum liber - Latin

01/17/2014 01:54 PMPosted by Uninstalled
Latin is very depended on capitalization of words for meaning.

liber means book.

So Canem mortuum liber should mean - Book of Dead Dog.


I looked at the latin dict. as well, and saw book, which wouldn't fit in with dog, let alone a dead one :)

However, Liber (after Roman Liber Pater) means free.

Liberary
Liberation

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liber_%28disambiguation%29
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I just thought, that this phrase is actually in the item window description at the top, much like 'Angelic Wings', or 'Blade Wings', so my interpretation could be wrong ( I admit that ). It could be 'the book of the dead dog".
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90 Night Elf Hunter
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01/17/2014 01:33 PMPosted by KingD


Yep. Idioms do not translate well word for word. For instance, translate "it came from out of the blue" into a foreign language word for word, and the speakers of that language would probably wonder how could anything emerge from a color. At least those who don't speak idiomatic American English.

It's probably the same with this Latin phrase.


"it came from out of the blue" you could translate in danish (my native language) and it would mean the same word for word. I have no idea if we share US/UK idioms, I would think so, since danish and english have influenced each other. Vikings brought Nordic to England, and in turn took some words with them back home. There are many words with similarities in english / Nordic (especially danish)

Hound = Hund
Egg = Æg
Land = Land (may also mean country in danish defined by context)
swimming = svømmer
conflict = konflikt
long = lang (longing however, would be længsel in danish)

"it came from out of the blue"
"det kom ud af det blå"

And a great deal of others as well :)


I think you're right; we have something in common--somewhere. Poor English has been beset by not only German and Nordic, but also French, Spanish (especially American English), Latin, and who knows what else.

English is truly the Heinz 57 of the world's languages.
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01/17/2014 02:07 PMPosted by Ryaskybird
English is truly the Heinz 57 of the world's languages.


LoL!

:o)
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01/17/2014 01:54 PMPosted by Uninstalled
Latin is very depended on capitalization of words for meaning.

liber means book.

So Canem mortuum liber should mean - Book of Dead Dog.


And this is what I postulated in chat last night. Bliz uses items to learn/spawn pets. A book of dead dog is what I figured they were going for.
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Latin is very depended on capitalization of words for meaning.

liber means book.

So Canem mortuum liber should mean - Book of Dead Dog.


And this is what I postulated in chat last night. Bliz uses items to learn/spawn pets. A book of dead dog is what I figured they were going for.


Well then, yes, that would give more meaning to book :)

We need a blue on this. Now I am curious!!
Edited by KingD#2483 on 1/17/2014 2:15 PM PST
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90 Night Elf Hunter
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01/17/2014 01:11 PMPosted by Ensgnblack


Yep. Idioms do not translate well word for word. For instance, translate "it came from out of the blue" into a foreign language word for word, and the speakers of that language would probably wonder how could anything emerge from a color. At least those who don't speak idiomatic American English.

It's probably the same with this Latin phrase.


While true, this should come out to something grammatically, regardless of making sense. The problem here is that the phrase does not work grammatically, unless I am missing something about it.

- There is no verb, or the verb (liber could be from liberare) is the wrong form for anything.
- The two words mortuum and canem go together, but cannot go with (agree with, in grammar) with liber.


I can't speak directly to your point as I don't know Latin, but I wonder, given the phrasing, if the phrase is a motto for a foreign company in the Roman legions, or was found on a family's coat of arms, or something like that. If so, it may deliberately be ungrammatical.
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90 Night Elf Hunter
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01/17/2014 02:14 PMPosted by MissCheetah
Latin is very depended on capitalization of words for meaning.

liber means book.

So Canem mortuum liber should mean - Book of Dead Dog.


And this is what I postulated in chat last night. Bliz uses items to learn/spawn pets. A book of dead dog is what I figured they were going for.


Heh, when I put the phrase through Google translator, it reads: A dead dog, a book.

Of course, Google is not the last (or even the first) word in translations, but it's close to your meaning. Though I have to admit I like "A dead dog is free" better :P
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01/17/2014 02:34 PMPosted by Ryaskybird


And this is what I postulated in chat last night. Bliz uses items to learn/spawn pets. A book of dead dog is what I figured they were going for.


Heh, when I put the phrase through Google translator, it reads: A dead dog, a book.

Of course, Google is not the last (or even the first) word in translations, but it's close to your meaning. Though I have to admit I like "A dead dog is free" better :P


Could it be both? The dual possible meaning is really neat. A book of "dead dog" to free its spirit.
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90 Night Elf Hunter
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Heh, when I put the phrase through Google translator, it reads: A dead dog, a book.

Of course, Google is not the last (or even the first) word in translations, but it's close to your meaning. Though I have to admit I like "A dead dog is free" better :P


Could it be both? The dual possible meaning is really neat. A book of "dead dog" to free its spirit.


A company enters the legion's camp after a hard day's march, their black hair and dark faces almost white from the dust from the road. An officer reads their banner as they pass.

"Canem mortuum liber? What in Pluto's hell is that supposed to mean?"

"Ignorant savages," another officer says, his aristocratic tones carrying above the noise of the camp. "Pater says that if we're not careful, we'll see Rome overrun by those who wouldn't know proper Latin if it bit them on the !@#$."

Overhearing, a third officer joins them. "Its meaning depends on who you talk to," he says. "To the soldiers, it means that even a dog is free in death--"

The second officer sneers. "Mangled it pretty badly, don't you think?"

The third officer ignores him. "However, it actually refers to the book their wise man is carrying."

Both the first and second officer turn their heads to the company in time to see a slightly built man pass by. Unlike the others in his company, his bald head and dark robes are completely free of road dust, as is the satchel hanging at his side, its embroidered silver symbols glittering.

"A magus!" the first officer says, his eyes widening. Then his eyes narrow as something else flashes in the waning sunlight. "What. . ."

"Spirit dogs," the third officer says. "Summoned by the wise man, using a spell from the book. They fight along side the soldiers."

"Probably the souls of their dead," the second officer says. "Ungrateful, ignorant curs, infesting Rome with their flea-bitten, flatulent-filled, degenerate--"

"Consul Laevinus claims that the soldiers and their spirit dogs were instrumental in defeating the Greeks at Heraclea," the third officer says.

"Ah," says the first officer as the second officer cuts off mid rant. "Well, in that case. . ."

The first officer tucks an arm into the second and third officers' arms, and turns them towards his tent. "My batman was able procure a rather plump pheasant and a couple of bottles of Pompeiian wine. I'd be very pleased if you both could join me for a repast."

"Of course," the third officer says, his face benign as he and the second officer fall into step. The second officer stumbles a bit, both worried over who heard his disparaging of a company that has Consul Laevinus' patronage and excited about dining with someone who has the consul's ear.

"Good, good," the first officer says, steadying stumbling officer. Glancing back, he casts one last look at the company and catches the eye of the magus--who winks.
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01/17/2014 01:43 PMPosted by TheSaint
Klaatu barada nikto


^ This guy gets it.
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Klaatu barada nikto


^ This guy gets it.


New class unveiled! Gort, the Humanoid Robot!

The Collector's Edition comes with a replica foam rubber Gort suit!
Edited by RedCell#1728 on 1/17/2014 7:29 PM PST
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I took Latin in high school for 3 years specifically to help with SATs. It can seriously be a maddening language to translate. Anyways, with regards to canem mortuum liber, I'd look at the context.

Liber is the primary noun, and would most likely be translated as book. Mortuum is an adjective, and it modifies canem in this case. So we get Book of the Dead/decaying/"spectral" dog/hound.
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Could it be both? The dual possible meaning is really neat. A book of "dead dog" to free its spirit.


A company enters the legion's camp after a hard day's march, their black hair and dark faces almost white from the dust from the road. An officer reads their banner as they pass.

"Canem mortuum liber? What in Pluto's hell is that supposed to mean?"

"Ignorant savages," another officer says, his aristocratic tones carrying above the noise of the camp. "Pater says that if we're not careful, we'll see Rome overrun by those who wouldn't know proper Latin if it bit them on the !@#$."

Overhearing, a third officer joins them. "Its meaning depends on who you talk to," he says. "To the soldiers, it means that even a dog is free in death--"

The second officer sneers. "Mangled it pretty badly, don't you think?"

The third officer ignores him. "However, it actually refers to the book their wise man is carrying."

Both the first and second officer turn their heads to the company in time to see a slightly built man pass by. Unlike the others in his company, his bald head and dark robes are completely free of road dust, as is the satchel hanging at his side, its embroidered silver symbols glittering.

"A magus!" the first officer says, his eyes widening. Then his eyes narrow as something else flashes in the waning sunlight. "What. . ."

"Spirit dogs," the third officer says. "Summoned by the wise man, using a spell from the book. They fight along side the soldiers."

"Probably the souls of their dead," the second officer says. "Ungrateful, ignorant curs, infesting Rome with their flea-bitten, flatulent-filled, degenerate--"

"Consul Laevinus claims that the soldiers and their spirit dogs were instrumental in defeating the Greeks at Heraclea," the third officer says.

"Ah," says the first officer as the second officer cuts off mid rant. "Well, in that case. . ."

The first officer tucks an arm into the second and third officers' arms, and turns them towards his tent. "My batman was able procure a rather plump pheasant and a couple of bottles of Pompeiian wine. I'd be very pleased if you both could join me for a repast."

"Of course," the third officer says, his face benign as he and the second officer fall into step. The second officer stumbles a bit, both worried over who heard his disparaging of a company that has Consul Laevinus' patronage and excited about dining with someone who has the consul's ear.

"Good, good," the first officer says, steadying stumbling officer. Glancing back, he casts one last look at the company and catches the eye of the magus--who winks.


*Thumps up and a bow*

:o)
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Loved the story Ryaskybird! Well done.
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01/17/2014 01:54 PMPosted by Uninstalled
Latin is very depended on capitalization of words for meaning.

liber means book.

So Canem mortuum liber should mean - Book of Dead Dog.


That is correct. On the other hand, your statement on capitalization is uncorrect. Latin had no capitalisation nor comas nor periods etc. Even spaces. A latin texte look like this :

CANESULULAREPERUMBRAMATADVANTATÆDÆ

Maybe you were refering to medieval latin ?

For the other traduction, it just can't be right. Even if one were to postulate that we have here a defective writing : CANEM MORTUUM LIBER (EST) [or other tenses], the word order just doesn't fit with latin syntax.
Edited by AshTag#2353 on 1/18/2014 6:00 AM PST
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01/17/2014 01:54 PMPosted by Uninstalled
Latin is very depended on capitalization of words for meaning.

liber means book.

So Canem mortuum liber should mean - Book of Dead Dog.


THis is not true. Latin had no punctuation or capitalization. THis was added by monks in the middle ages.

Also "of the dead dog" would be genitive. And the endings indicate accusative.

I am a high school Latin teacher, by the way.
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Blizzard: If the translation is indeed supposed to be book of the dead dog, it should be: "canis mortui liber" (or canis mortuae liber if a feminine dog).
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