Diablo® III

canem mortuum liber - Latin

Yeah, we really need a blue on this. Get some facts on the table :)
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MVP - Technical Support
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I have sent up that bat signal on it...in part because they love lore and I think they had a lot to do with the pet. They are off until Monday though and Monday morning is full of meetings there. They are always on forms later that day.
Edited by MissCheetah#1661 on 1/18/2014 5:21 PM PST
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01/18/2014 05:20 PMPosted by MissCheetah
I have sent up that bat signal on it...in part because they love lore and I think they had a lot to do with the pet. They are off until Monday though and Monday morning is full of meetings there. They are always on forms later that day.


Ok :)
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I would still love an answer on this. Either I am missing something obvious, or the translation Blizzard used seems to be nonsensical.
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MVP - Technical Support
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I don't know that you will get a Blue response but I did get some feedback. The most I can share is that they love some of the interpretations here, especially Ryaskybird's story. For now they are going to let the intent remain a mystery :)
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25 minutes to Madrid el derby and really tired here of not getting killed with my expert level 57 monk at Tristram I finally got the energy I so long not to have so as to have a concrete reason not to play the game and just do sumtin else so I finally googled the gift I got from blizzard which is now my pet - LIBER CANIS MORTUI (spectral hound) and I got redirected here (what are the odds?). Anyway Just wana know if someone else has gotten the same 'thank you' gift from Blizzard as mine doesn't actually do anything but tamely roars or 'grrrs' from time to time even when I'm at my last drops of blood during battle. I tried to get rid of it because I almost died once and it was just there scratching itself but I can't as it's account bound. Duno why Blizz gave me 9 gifts which are just 3 of the same kinds. 3 dogs, 2 books- 3 of the same kind each - ARMA HAERETICORUM and ARMA MORTIS both of which are Legendary Transmogrify Plan that Haedrig don't want anything to do with 'till I could get to the Torment level I suppose. Btw my take on this CANEM MORTUUM LIBER is - The free book for dead dogs to chew on... It's like being in prison maybe that no matter how senseless the different groups inside are, to those involved and blinded by it's purposes and meaning as to why they even exist in the first place, to them they mean everything- it's all they have and that the narcs would just let them be as long as they only hurt themselves as they're as good as dead anyway or sumtin I don't know. Someone also mentioned Heinz 57- check this out http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/181/why-does-heinz-ketchup-say-57-varieties. Digging the drops and improvements in skills Bliz though I gota say I'm hoping the The Wave of Light - Pillar of the Ancients to be more exciting and devastating as it's the main finishing skill of monks. Thank you! Peace out!
Edited by rufflewater#6975 on 3/6/2014 3:30 AM PST
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Couldn't they patch this and at least give this hound a little bit of a nip? Say 10% of weapon damage or something? Otherwise it's pretty useless . . . cute, but useless.
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I rechecked the Latin on the dog today, and it is now correct: liber canis mortui

gratias ago, Blizzard.

You have eased this grammarian's troubled heart.
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MVP - Technical Support
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Well I did pass on your feedback like I promised :p

Glad to see it is now correct now. I still personally LOVE Bird's story and have it saved.
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90 Tauren Paladin
9945
01/17/2014 11:04 AMPosted by Ensgnblack
Sounds like it means

The dog has been dead for a long time or extended period.

Canem = A dog

Mortuum/Mortuus = Dead

Liber = The free one

I take it to mean, that the dog has already died, and has been dead for some time.


But liber is nominative (the subject) and canem is accusative (the direct object). The two words cannot grammatically go together. Using the words that way also leaves us without a verb, making the subject/direct object relationship odd. We also cannot imply the berb "to be" and make it something like "the free one is a dead dog" because "to be" is intransitive and would take a predicate nominative.


I am by no means fluent in latin, but I read it as "free dead dog" or "free dog of death"
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I'm Brazilian, so it's relatively easy to pick a latin word and understant, because it's pretty much the same radical that is used in Portuguese words (we also have a few greek radicals too), but it's harder to extract meaning for a phrase.

Have a curious point, indeed: in the Portuguese translation, they have changed this phrase to: liber canis mortui. Have no idea why they did it, but sounds like they corrected it. The genitive case is more appropriate to express noun relations (without verbs).
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In this case, i think it's appropriate to say "free dog of death", because genitive form basically corresponds to the English preposition "of".

In Portuguese, it is written: "cão da morte livre", where we have the same radicals in: cão/canis livre/liber and mortui/morte.
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01/16/2014 06:22 PMPosted by Ensgnblack
I am wondering exactly what this phrase is supposed to be in Latin.

"dead dog" is in Latin, but in the accusative case.

liber could be "free" in which case it would be nominative singular masculine, and not agree with dog.

Or it could be "book" but without a verb, the phrase seems odd. "Book dead dog" since dead dog cannot be genitive (the book of the dead dog).

Am I missing something obvious here?


"Book of the dead dog", used for summoning the dead dog?
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Couldn't it be simply telling us: "Free the Dead Dog"?
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I took Latin for close to 10 years. Some good points are made in this thread. In non-textbook Latin, you will often find many missing verbs / subjects that are meant to be inferred. A lot of this was tied to properly fitting to certain meters such as dactylic hexameter or iambic dimeter.

Liber can be one of three things: 1) a book, 2) the adjective "free", 3) a noun loosely translated to "the free one." It is close to the first conjugation verb Libero as well which means "to free;" though, no conjugation of said verb would produce "liber." Canem and mortuum are both accusative; the latter is an adjective modifying the former.

I don't really have a definitive answer here. To me it means, "The one who frees the dead dog."
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we need a blue on this one
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Wait, lemme Google that for you, sinse you can't. For...some reason.
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It could simply mean dead dog off the leash, since it's not chained that could be the free part.
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