Diablo® III

Buying a gaming computer

Posts: 475
I am thinking of buying a gaming computer mainly to play Diablo 3 but other pc games as well such as Skyrim and so on.

Please DO NOT tell me not to buy D3, I already have it.

Ok so I want to buy a computer from iBuyPower, its a website and i can customize computers. My thing is what kinds of processors and chips and whatnot should i try to purchase while keeping the cost low.

I do want to buy an NVIDIA geforce, otherwise I just want decent quality and able to play games at anything BUT the lowest possible settings.

Halp please :D
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AMD processors and chips have been considered "budget" parts I've used them and i'm happy with the performance.
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03/20/2014 06:38 PMPosted by Paragon
I am thinking of buying a gaming computer mainly to play Diablo 3 but other pc games as well such as Skyrim and so on.

Please DO NOT tell me not to buy D3, I already have it.

Ok so I want to buy a computer from iBuyPower, its a website and i can customize computers. My thing is what kinds of processors and chips and whatnot should i try to purchase while keeping the cost low.

I do want to buy an NVIDIA geforce, otherwise I just want decent quality and able to play games at anything BUT the lowest possible settings.

Halp please :D


You ever think about looking up a youtube video on how to put your own together? Its much cheaper, and you can chose the parts you wants. The internet is full of free step by step instructions.

Makes we wonder why people even still go to college!
Edited by Blackhært#1193 on 3/20/2014 6:44 PM PDT
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What's your budget?
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Posts: 475
I figure for the computer and some accessories I want to stay around $800. There is tax and shipping on top of it which still cost money, but ibuypower has some decent upgrade deals during march madness so i wanted to jump on it, and a friend of mine recommended me to them.

I don't need a monitor, its mostly having a decent processor to handle the graphics card and such.
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03/20/2014 06:48 PMPosted by Paragon
I figure for the computer and some accessories I want to stay around $800. There is tax and shipping on top of it which still cost money, but ibuypower has some decent upgrade deals during march madness so i wanted to jump on it, and a friend of mine recommended me to them.

I don't need a monitor, its mostly having a decent processor to handle the graphics card and such.


You could build a decent system for $800 that will likely cost $1200-1400 on iBuy Power.
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Build your own system. The amount of money you will save can be used to buy much better parts. The computer you build for the same amount of money would blow the pre built one out of the water.

In general though I would recommend an AMD processor. Just get the best FX series one you can afford. Quad core is fine. It does not have to be 6 or 8 core but all of their CPU's are cheap so if you can go higher then why not. Grab an 8gb RAM 1600mhz RAM kit from a reputable brand. In terms of graphics anything higher than a GTX 650ti should suit your needs well. Look up benchmarks for specific games besides Diablo you want to play. Also, make sure you get a quality power supply. 500 watts should be fine for you. If you get a better graphics card maybe go for 650 watts.
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90 Gnome Monk
9005
Posts: 145
Never buy, build it.
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I just put together a quote for my brother. 900 bucks, and its a pretty stout setup for the bucks.

i5 Haswell 4430 85W, Gigabyte GA-B85M-D3H, 16GB DDR3 1600, 500GB WD Black, Blu-Ray combo drive, nVidia GTX 660 2GB 192Bit, 7 Home 64, Corsair PSU CX500W. Will get the job done.

AMD has a lower price point per feature, but I have always felt the best performance was with intel. I have built plenty of both. Have a couple of the quad core AMDs around here. But have never been as happy with them. Anyway.

I build computers for a living, so I like to think I have a fair hand at it. But that's my opinion.
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Posts: 475
Now mind you, I only know some parts and that they are important, as for the actual installation however I am clueless. I do know that building is cheaper, but that's because of the knowledge needed to put it all together.

I could probably look things up online and figure it out that way. I appreciate the help everyone. And its not just D3 i am buying it for, but just for price and the fact my macbook can't do half of what a PC does :D.
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03/20/2014 06:56 PMPosted by Paragon
Now mind you, I only know some parts and that they are important, as for the actual installation however I am clueless. I do know that building is cheaper, but that's because of the knowledge needed to put it all together.

I could probably look things up online and figure it out that way. I appreciate the help everyone. And its not just D3 i am buying it for, but just for price and the fact my macbook can't do half of what a PC does :D.


Heres 1 out of like 12 videos after doing a quick search on youtube. Its quite easy to do yourself.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bUghCx9iso

!@#$, I'd build for you just for fun.
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03/20/2014 06:56 PMPosted by Paragon
Now mind you, I only know some parts and that they are important, as for the actual installation however I am clueless. I do know that building is cheaper, but that's because of the knowledge needed to put it all together.

I could probably look things up online and figure it out that way. I appreciate the help everyone. And its not just D3 i am buying it for, but just for price and the fact my macbook can't do half of what a PC does :D.


There are dozens of in depth complete video tutorials on youtube from reputable places such as Newegg that show you step by step how to do it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_56kyib-Ls
Edited by NecroVile#1877 on 3/20/2014 6:59 PM PDT
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Here, a link to the build, if you want to see it. You can also pick and build your own there as well.

http://secure.newegg.com/WishList/PublicWishDetail.aspx?WishListNumber=29997967

Good luck though.
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Posts: 28
Regardless of whether you end up buying ibuypower, building your own or whatever you do, here's some general tips to prevent you from buying extra things for no reason.

-for all intents and purposes i5s are much better than i3s, i7s are no better than i5s (a.k.a. go with i5 if you go Intel unless you are already aware of a reason to go i7)
- anything more than 8GB of RAM is going to go to waste
-if you want an nvidia card a 660 is a pretty good budget option. the way the naming works is the hundreds tell you the generation (higher is better) and the tens basically tell you the relative power in that generation (again, higher is better), you can go as high as you want, but under no circumstances go lower than a x60 (660, or 760). you drop down to their low end cards, and are paying only slightly less for vastly less performance. This is important, because even high end pc building companies tend to skimp on graphics cards, offering like a 750 or equivalent as their standard option.
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Chances are that most people here would tell you to buy the parts and build it yourself (which I have done). If you're into that kind of thing, there are lots of great online resources that can help you get started. It sounds complicated, but putting a computer together is like playing with Legos that have sharp edges and a few cables. If you're interested in it, have a look at http://www.http://pcpartpicker.com/, it's a great resource for pretty much anything related to PC building. It'll save you a few dollars too if you decide to go that route.

Sorry for the wall of text, I went a bit overboard.

If that isn't really your cup of tea, I'll try my best to give you a decent recommendation for parts and a general overview of the main parts you should think about.

CPU: AMD vs Intel

There used to be a time where there was usually a clear option for what you want to pick, which is still fairly true nowadays, but not quite as definitive as it used to be. Generally, AMD has a large market share on budget parts. Their CPU's are cheap, yet powerful, the perfect bang-for-your-buck. I'm running an AMD FX-8150 in my computer, and it's all that I've really needed. As long as you don't do any extremely CPU intensive tasks like encoding, I would definitely recommend that you get an AMD CPU.

Intel has a lot of fans though, as their chips generally are better performing than their AMD counterparts, but with a higher price tag to boot. A good current-gen i5 though is pretty much always a solid option, they're relatively inexpensive and pack a lot of punch.

GPU (Graphics Card): AMD vs NVIDIA

Now, as with CPU's, there was a time where NVIDIA was undeniably better in all regards. Now that isn't exactly true. As with CPU's, AMD has some great budget graphics cards that are pretty powerful cards. AMD cards are better for bitcoin mining if you're into that kind of thing. Some good manufacturers for AMD cards are Sapphire and XFX. I used to run a Sapphire HD7870 in my computer, but it had faulty memory and I had to have it replaced. (It wasn't AMD nor Sapphire's fault, I bought it in a Hong Kong marketplace and they somehow managed to damage the card)

I'd recommend an NVIDIA card though. They have better drivers, and although they are more expensive, they are really powerful. Even the lower-end cards are pretty dang strong. I'm running a GTX 760 in my computer at the moment, and it runs like a champ. I can play most games at 70-80 FPS at almost maxed graphics, running Diablo 3 at about 120-150 at max pretty consistently. The only time that I drop below 90 FPS is when I'm partying with 3 frozen orb wizards or something. For NVIDIA card manufacturers I would go with EVGA, MSI, or Asus. EVGA has great customer service and reliably sturdy cards.

RAM

Anything more than 8GB of RAM is going to be wasted for what you're doing. Just make sure that you get a good speed on your memory, the higher the better (Don't spend too much though, RAM prices are insanely inflated right now)

Hard Disk Drive (HDD) vs Solid State Drive (SSD)

To put it simply, Hard Disk Drives are cheaper and more reliable than SSD's. However, because of the way SSD's store memory they are insanely fast. So installing games on an SSD will make games load faster. A lot of people opt to have a 1TB HDD for main data storage, movies/pictures/documents/non-essentail programs etc, while having a secondary drive, a small SSD, to install games on. SSD's are expensive, so if it isn't in your budget it isn't that big of a deal.
Edited by SideGFX#1780 on 3/20/2014 7:05 PM PDT
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03/20/2014 06:59 PMPosted by MagneLithic
-for all intents and purposes i5s are much better than i3s, i7s are no better than i5s (a.k.a. go with i5 if you go Intel unless you are already aware of a reason to go i7)


Yeah, you only need an i7 if you are using it as a workstation.
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Posts: 475
Thank you so much, all of you! Honestly you have all been a great help.

As for deciding whether or not I want to build myself I personally would love to, however I also don't want to buy a bunch of parts and then fail at putting them together haha.

I did read something about pcpartpicker because it helps prevent you from combining parts that are incompatible with each other.

One thing I was worried about was the operating system since I believe buying them pre-built they do come with them (each company does that differently) and operating systems can be pretty pricey.
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Yep, I agree, i7's are overkill in many ways. I have an i7 laptop and an i5 desktop, and I can't tell the difference, personally I think the desktop fairs better, but it has a higher clock speed. lol

I look at Intel as higher priced, but better power to speed ratio it seems to me.

AMD stuff seems to have a lower price point on same points per package, (ie speed, cache, cores, etc), but I have often found them a bit lacking in some builds. But they are great for those that are pinching the budget, cause you can build a nice performance AMD machine for less cost than the Intel.
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Things you will need to know if you buy from a prebuilt site:

Never EVER go with the generic RAM or power supply. It WILL fail, and you will be sad. And it will cost more to replace that part than to buy a new better version. Just save the time and hassle, get a name brand for both pieces.

Check for discounts, promotions, upcoming sales, freebies, etc. People often miss a lot of goodies.

Don't be afraid to ask questions to a store rep. Call them or email them any concerns and questions. They know as much or more than any person you ask here.

Lastly, be patient. It will likely take longer than they tell you to get your pc shipped to you. And once the delivery service has it, god only knows....
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