Diablo® III

Hidden Gems of Gaming

I was thinking back on the list of video games I've played over the years and realized that a lot of them aren't very well known in the gaming community, even back then. So I was curious, what are some of the hidden gems you've found over the years. Name a few games that you thought were absolutely brilliant but for whatever reason didn't make it mainstream.

I have two favorites that come to mind. Both, I believe were well ahead of their time. Had they been released maybe 5-10 years later and with proper marketing, they'd have done very well.

The Wheel of Time - A first person shooter based on Robert Jordan's epic fantasy book series of the same name. This game broke the rules of FPS games by replacing guns and ammo with magic artifacts (somewhere around 40) that had different effects from shielding to stunning to teleporting to killing.

Sacrifice - A third person over the shoulder RTS where you played as a wizard who ran around the field of battle casting spells and harvesting souls to summon buildings and minions.
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I feel that MAG (Massive Action Game) on PS3 was a massively under appreciated game, was 128 VS 128 man FPS that was just crazy amounts of chaos, felt like a real war!

played that game hard for at least 6 months, but it never really got to popular sadly
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Posts: 83
Just looked up the wheel of time and sacrifice. Both of those look great. I think I'm going to give Wheel of time a shot.

It's not entirely unknown but I really felt that Bard's Tale was completely under-appreciated.

Also, I felt that 3-D WorldRunner for NES was entirely unloved for how amazing it was. I think it sold around half a million copies in total but was without a doubt one of my favorites growing up. It's possible that my Nobuo Uematsu addiction was spawned from this game.
Edited by Goutan#1280 on 11/13/2012 10:31 AM PST
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90 Troll Rogue
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Agreed on Bard's Tale, I loved it.
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83 Undead Mage
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Hi people!

Since we're talking about not well known games, I've been pretty hyped about this project: Hero-U - http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1878147873/hero-u-rogue-to-redemption

It's from the creators of Quest For Glory, which still is one of my favorite games.
Sierra's games introduced me to the gaming world ;)

If you guys have the time, check it out. I've backed it and hopes it gets funded.
Edited by Uby#1720 on 11/13/2012 6:59 PM PST
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90 Troll Rogue
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"Heck yeah" to Hero U as well! Heard mucho good stuff about Quest for Glory, though have not played it yet personally.
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Posts: 2,810
I'm not sure how much of a "hidden gem" this is, but I'll nominate Haunting Ground on the PS2. It got mixed reviews and compared with Resident Evil often, which isn't surprising since it's a Capcom game and is a survival horror game. I've heard it called "Resident Evil Lite".

Had a great cast of creepy and perverse enemies that would chase the main character around a fairly creepy castle. You had no real weapons other than your doggy companion and had to outrun and hide from your pursuers. The chases could get intense especially when your 'fear meter' gets too high. The screen is blurry and the character constantly runs forcing you to avoid stuff long enough for the fear to subside. While in this mode, you can die to the enemies.

Speaking of deaths, they were pretty gruesome and awesome. General game overs would show castle scenery with the sounds of your killer doing...whatever...to the character's dead body (don't really know what happened but from the sounds of the killer, you could guess) with creepy laughter and whatnot to go along with it. The best was the cutscene deaths from going somewhere you shouldn't or doing something you shouldn't. You never really saw the actual death (iirc) but would hear the death happening.

The main character was the typical young woman dressed in completely inappropriate clothes. Though considering what the main bad guys wanted to do with her, it wasn't completely off base. One interesting note is that Capcom seems to have recycled her appearance to some degree to use as the RE5 Jill Valentine.

Edit: Also Daniella, the second enemy to chase you around, was the best enemy in the game. You see her transform from a monotone, emotionless maid to a bat!@#$ insane homicidal maniac carrying a large piece of glass she took from a mirror she smashed her own face into. The crazy laughter was amazing as well.

Trailer

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-r1kyzYbNU
Edited by Ringo#1617 on 11/13/2012 8:48 PM PST
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The close Combat series was always underrated in RTS circles.(taken from wikipedia which is all accurate.)

There were many innovations in the Close Combat games compared to previous titles, which combined to make Close Combat more realistic than most RTT and real-time strategy (RTS) computer games:

Mental condition: Close Combat used a psychological (morale) model for each individual combatant. The combatant's morale would be affected by factors such as being near officers, being supported by other units, being under fire, taking casualties, and being left without orders. Troops would be Stable when they were in no danger; Cowering when pinned down by enemy fire; or Panicked when surrounded by dead comrades, wounded or near enemy flamethrowers. The use of a psychological model made certain tactics common in RTS games, where the units will follow suicidal orders, impossible in Close Combat. For example, attempting a "mass rush" in Close Combat would result in units seeking cover, refusing to obey orders or even deserting.

Experience: In Close Combat, reserve units or newly replaced troops would fire and move more slowly and be more likely to panic. Because of this, they would be unlikely to prevail against veteran troops. This is unlike most RTS games where all troops of a particular type act similarly.

Ammunition levels The game also modelled the amount of ammunition each unit possessed. Troops in a heavy fire-fight would quickly run out of ammunition. Once out of ammunition they would resort to bayonet fighting, or surrender to any enemies that approached them, although they could also scavenge weapons or ammunition from fallen friendly and enemy soldiers. This is in contrast to most RTS games, where units have unlimited ammunition supplies.

Scavenging: Soldiers that expended all ammo could be moved into close vicinity of dead soldiers to take their ammunition. If no ammunition was present at times they would pick up whatever weapon the dead soldier had. Enemy weapons could be picked up as well. However, enemy ammo cannot be scavenged by itself.

Physical state: In Close Combat, troops could be Healthy; Injured by enemy fire (in which case they would move and fire more slowly); Incapacitated if enemy fire caused the soldier to be unable to fight; and finally Dead. This is in contrast to most RTS games, where units fight and move regardless of their closeness to death.

Stamina: In Close Combat, troops could be Rested; Winded after exerting themselves, in which case they would move slowly until they were rested again; and Fatigued, after prolonged exertion, slowing them down for the rest of the battle. This is in contrast to most RTS games, where units do not tire.

The factors above meant that the game required realistic military tactics, such as careful placement of troops in cover, ambush, advancing under cover and using terrain or smoke-screens to cover advancing troops. Effective management, such as keeping teams near their officers, not sending green recruits on assaults and maintaining fire discipline so as not to run out of ammunition were also necessary for the player to prevail.

Players also have to make effective use of combined-arms tactics to be successful in Close Combat. Infantry assault require support from machine guns, tanks, and mortars, to suppress enemy fire. Armor units also require screening from infantry units. Although they possess superior firepower, tanks are vulnerable to ambushes from bazooka or panzerschreck units, especially in close quarters such as a town or forest, where the ambushing infantry can wait to have a shot at a tank's vulnerable flank or rear armor. Tanks are also vulnerable to fire from concealed anti-tank guns, or ambushing tanks, which may wait to fire until the enemy presents his flank or rear.

How many RTS games now days have this sort of detail.
Edited by Bluddflagg#6648 on 11/13/2012 8:58 PM PST
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Just looked up the wheel of time and sacrifice. Both of those look great. I think I'm going to give Wheel of time a shot.

It's not entirely unknown but I really felt that Bard's Tale was completely under-appreciated.

Also, I felt that 3-D WorldRunner for NES was entirely unloved for how amazing it was. I think it sold around half a million copies in total but was without a doubt one of my favorites growing up. It's possible that my Nobuo Uematsu addiction was spawned from this game.


Both games were very fun in single player mode. However, I think they shined the most in multiplayer. WoT especially was very inventive in Citadel (team vs team ctf) mode, which gave you a few minutes of setup time at the very beginning of the game to set booby traps barriers and the like in your citadel.

Thanks to everyone for your recommendations. I'm going to check out a few of these.
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Both games were very fun in single player mode. However, I think they shined the most in multiplayer. WoT especially was very inventive in Citadel (team vs team ctf) mode, which gave you a few minutes of setup time at the very beginning of the game to set booby traps barriers and the like in your citadel.

Thanks to everyone for your recommendations. I'm going to check out a few of these.


On another note, I should mention that I've heard that there is a fairly active multiplayer community for Wheel of Time.
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I named all my D3 heroes after characters from Sacrifice!

I actually thought the gameplay of Sacrifice itself was pretty fundamentally flawed because most battles were settled in the first couple of conflicts but they still dragged out, and the POV focus on your wizard made multi-pronged strategies too difficult to manage. But I really liked the setting, characters, and the way the story plays out in slightly different ways based on which gods you choose to serve.
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