Diablo® III

A coin has 2 sides...

A coin has 2 sides, each side had a 50/50 chance of landing up when you flip it.
If I flip a coin 20 times and it's head all 20 times does that mean the world is broken?

Re apply this logic with how percentages (or RNG if you like) work, because it's the same thing.

If you can't comprehend what I'm saying, you just can't comprehend how RNG works.
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Thanks.
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Ok then, Mr. Two-face.
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How "random number generation" works isn't exactly the same thing as chance itself.

get seed from a value that always changes->do math to determine value based on criteria->a number that was not actually random is produced, but due to the nature that this number is different at any time other than the millisecond (or maybe even nanosecond) of it's generation, it is effectively random (pseudorandom)

I think you meant to say, "You just can't comprehend statistics.", or maybe even just "random", rather than a silly overused buzzword.
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wow what a hip, new and original thread :D.
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I agree with Aspie.

And as far as the coin comparison to the RNG Loot System is like comparing a party balloon to a space shuttle. Slightly more complex.
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It might mean that the coin is weighted. Sure, the single trial of 20 flips isn't a perfect confirmation, but it's enough to make you suspicious. (There's only an approximate one in a million chance of that happening; 1 in 1,048,576 to be exact.)

If you have a table in the middle of your room, according to quantum mechanics, there is a finite, nonzero probability that the next time you observe this table, all its valence electrons would spontaneously excite, and you would observe a massive combustive photoelectric process for an object that isn't even a metal. However, the probability is so tiny that you can't expect this to ever happen in the age of the universe. If it does, you can probably assume that something is amiss, and that it isn't just some freak occurrence of quantum probability.

The same is true here. There are proper, well established statistical tests that can be used to verify whether or not something is adhering to the probability distribution that you expect, even if it has inherently random outcomes.

I'm not saying that such a test has ever been successfully carried out for D3 drop rates (and, in fact, I don't actually believe that there's anything wrong with them). I'm just illustrating the fact that you can still develop positive suspicions, and even debunk expected distributions from systems by observing a significant enough anomaly, even though there was a finite probability for that anomaly.
Edited by Bottle#1907 on 11/17/2012 7:20 AM PST
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To be completely accurate a coin has 3 sides as it can land on it's side.
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A cat has 2 sides, each side has a 50/50 chance of landing up when you toss it.
If I flip a cat 20 times and he is landing on his paws all 20 times does that mean the world is broken ?

Re apply this logic with how percentages (or RNG if you like) work, because it's the same thing.

If you can't comprehend what I'm saying, you just can't comprehend how RNG works.

When an excessively improbable event happens, it's legitimate to investigate.
Maybe cats are more likely to fall on their paws than on their moustaches.
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Toss a coin. 100 heads in a row. Possible. Yes.
Spin a coin. It stops spinning without falling on its side -- heads/tails. Possible? Yes.
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A coin has 2 sides, each side had a 50/50 chance of landing up when you flip it.If I flip a coin 20 times and it's head all 20 times does that mean the world is broken?


Da Fuk?
Edited by Vranx#1586 on 11/17/2012 7:58 AM PST
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While probably not for most, some of you responding to this thread would probably enjoy reading "The Drunkard's Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives" by Leonard Mlodinow.

Cheers,
OddOne
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a coin is a cylinder... technically it has 3 sides... just saying
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How "random number generation" works isn't exactly the same thing as chance itself.

get seed from a value that always changes->do math to determine value based on criteria->a number that was not actually random is produced, but due to the nature that this number is different at any time other than the millisecond (or maybe even nanosecond) of it's generation, it is effectively random (pseudorandom)

Sure, but pseudorandom is ok.

http://pastebin.com/m5StsN82

Believe it or not, even experiment(17) gives a result in less than 10 minutes. So even with pseudo random, it is completely possible to get 17 consecutive heads. I have no reason to believe that if I waited for more time, maybe 2 hours, I would reach 40 consecutive heads in one moment.


You missed my point entirely. The OP said:
11/17/2012 06:56 AMPosted by Weism
If you can't comprehend what I'm saying, you just can't comprehend how RNG works.


I was playing on the fact he said "how RNG works". I explained it. The end of my post clarifies that.
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