Diablo® III

Every voice matters...

12/12/2012 03:22 PMPosted by PenitentSin
On a positive note, there seem to be more blue posts now than even two weeks ago. And not just in garbage threads either.


Wtf does this have to do with anything?
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Let's cut the CMs some slack, shall we? I've been in the software industry long enough to know that a) bending over to indulge every single end user's whim is a recipe for disaster (and I have seen companies go belly up by doing just that,) and b) there's a big difference between what you know and what you let be known. Even if CMs know dates and planned content, they are in no position to share that information with us -- not even the fact that they have it. I spent over a decade in similar positions and I know what it is to be between a rock and a hard place.

Let's not mix targets, estimates and commitments. I'm sure devs are already getting enough of that from their managers as it is. I am as disillusioned with the game as the next guy but taking it out on the CMs won't solve anything.


Yes the CMs are just doing their job and honestly aren't doing bad at all given what they have to work with lol.

The target of your ire should be the designers, the ones that made this game an accessible boring bland piece of !@#$ so they could get a few more bucks out of RMAH and console gamers.
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Wtf does this have to do with anything?


The whole point of this thread is that Blizzard takes no input from community or lists any new developments.

More blue posts means the CMs are actually reading concerns i.e. doing their jobs.

Just thought I'd point that out.
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12/12/2012 02:16 PMPosted by ChuckNorris
I just really hope they can fix wd mana problems.


LMAO what mana problems?
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In this day and age, it’s not unusual for a community to expect that a game will have some form of continued development after its release, even if it’s a game like Diablo III (which doesn’t really have the same content model as something like World of Warcraft, for example).

A lot of you have been concerned about the lack of game-changing adjustments in patch 1.0.6 and 1.0.6a, and we can certainly sympathize since they’re not the kind of patches you’ve been used to seeing for Diablo III. Smaller patches like those aren’t unusual for Blizzard games, though, and are often needed to address important issues quickly (issues that can’t be resolved with a hotfix or really wait for a larger content patch that might be scheduled for a later date). Similarly, sometimes patches will contain a lot of behind-the-scenes changes that aren’t visible to players, but are still necessary to keep the game running smoothly or enable testing for new features that are coming down the line. This was the case for both 1.0.6a and 1.0.6, respectively. Lylirra provided a bit more transparency about that [url="http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/7383168500#7"]here[/url] and [url="http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/7379007846?page=3#52"]here[/url]. They’re a bit technical, but that’s doesn’t mean they’re made-up jargon – that’s really just how patching works.

But, just because the latest patches have been smaller, that doesn’t mean we haven’t been working on improvements to the game. We commented on some stuff already that we have planned for future patches (to provide a very recent example, here’s some info on [url="http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/7349425431?page=2#39"]Reflects Damage[/url]). In many cases, though, we may not be in position to comment on what the developers are working on, either because they’re still working on the design process or we’re not really sure if what we have is actually going to make it into the game. Over the years we have found it is better to avoid promising anything about future content (until we are as close to 100% certain about it as possible) than to retract previous communication when something gets cut or delayed from a patch, or changed to something completely different. Even acknowledging that an issue exists is enough for some players to walk away with “they know, so something will be done immediately” and can be harmful if said issue’s resolution doesn’t make it into a patch.

Acknowledging community’s concerns is very important, but requires some finesse when we do. Some of you will disagree with that philosophy and for very good reasons. We promise the community team is listening, relaying to development teams and working hard to make sure information is digestible and ready to go as soon as the proverbial light turns green.


We don't really care about reflect damage, take a look at the Diablo subreddit, people are trying to give ideas for future content patches, endless dungeons etc. We want content like this, when we have gotten big content patches like that so we can continue playing the game for years and years without needing more content patches, you can start with the small fixes like reflect damage.

Something extremely big for the game but still really easy to fix, is increasing monster density of Act 1 and Act 2 so these Acts are viable to farm, at the moment we're kind of forced to farm Act 3 since it's the most efficient. This would open up a lot of content that's already in the game.

Really happy that you took the time to write this huge post though. :p
Edited by Zyfoh#2357 on 12/12/2012 3:43 PM PST
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12/12/2012 02:22 PMPosted by Menacetech
Currently, I'm not a satisfied customer. But thanks for all those other games you put out in the past

I really like this part.
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12/12/2012 02:15 PMPosted by Goodbrew
Yeah! The Diablo 3 community has been nothing but supportive and open to information from Blizzard and its CMs, never overly exagerating or taking quotes continuously out of context! What reason could they possibly have for not posting stuff anymore?
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12/12/2012 02:55 PMPosted by gaud
rediculas.
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blizz made their $ off D3 sales and are still gradually getting RMAH sales and blizz has shifted focus to WoW, nothing to see here.
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I'm an old gamer... haven't played a computer game (got hooked on xbox when my son finally got one) since diablo 2 exp (before the ladders... I don't even know what those are).

My expectation is for very small patches that clean up minor problems. My expectation is not for totally new content released as a patch. To be honest, although I loved 1.05, I was frankly completely offended by the whole "practice realm" or whatever that crap was. I felt like if they are adding new content and I'm not paying for it, it's not a bonus, it's a sign that the game was released unfinished. I don't want to be testing stuff that should have been released with the game. If the game is done, let it be done and move on. If you want to give us an expansion, charge me for the expansion and make it rock. These incremental improvements make me feel like you rushed the game to shelves after 10 years. Sad, really.
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In this day and age, it’s not unusual for a community to expect that a game will have some form of continued development after its release, even if it’s a game like Diablo III (which doesn’t really have the same content model as something like World of Warcraft, for example).

A lot of you have been concerned about the lack of game-changing adjustments in patch 1.0.6 and 1.0.6a, and we can certainly sympathize since they’re not the kind of patches you’ve been used to seeing for Diablo III. Smaller patches like those aren’t unusual for Blizzard games, though, and are often needed to address important issues quickly (issues that can’t be resolved with a hotfix or really wait for a larger content patch that might be scheduled for a later date). Similarly, sometimes patches will contain a lot of behind-the-scenes changes that aren’t visible to players, but are still necessary to keep the game running smoothly or enable testing for new features that are coming down the line. This was the case for both 1.0.6a and 1.0.6, respectively. Lylirra provided a bit more transparency about that here and here. They’re a bit technical, but that’s doesn’t mean they’re made-up jargon – that’s really just how patching works.

But, just because the latest patches have been smaller, that doesn’t mean we haven’t been working on improvements to the game. We commented on some stuff already that we have planned for future patches (to provide a very recent example, here’s some info on Reflects Damage). In many cases, though, we may not be in position to comment on what the developers are working on, either because they’re still working on the design process or we’re not really sure if what we have is actually going to make it into the game. Over the years we have found it is better to avoid promising anything about future content (until we are as close to 100% certain about it as possible) than to retract previous communication when something gets cut or delayed from a patch, or changed to something completely different. Even acknowledging that an issue exists is enough for some players to walk away with “they know, so something will be done immediately” and can be harmful if said issue’s resolution doesn’t make it into a patch.

Acknowledging community’s concerns is very important, but requires some finesse when we do. Some of you will disagree with that philosophy and for very good reasons. We promise the community team is listening, relaying to development teams and working hard to make sure information is digestible and ready to go as soon as the proverbial light turns green.


Grimiku RYZEN! *applaud*

You've still got a long way to reach Lylirra status if you choose to grind that many forum levels XD
Reply Quote
In this day and age, it’s not unusual for a community to expect that a game will have some form of continued development after its release, even if it’s a game like Diablo III (which doesn’t really have the same content model as something like World of Warcraft, for example).

A lot of you have been concerned about the lack of game-changing adjustments in patch 1.0.6 and 1.0.6a, and we can certainly sympathize since they’re not the kind of patches you’ve been used to seeing for Diablo III. Smaller patches like those aren’t unusual for Blizzard games, though, and are often needed to address important issues quickly (issues that can’t be resolved with a hotfix or really wait for a larger content patch that might be scheduled for a later date). Similarly, sometimes patches will contain a lot of behind-the-scenes changes that aren’t visible to players, but are still necessary to keep the game running smoothly or enable testing for new features that are coming down the line. This was the case for both 1.0.6a and 1.0.6, respectively. Lylirra provided a bit more transparency about that [url="http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/7383168500#7"]here[/url] and [url="http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/7379007846?page=3#52"]here[/url]. They’re a bit technical, but that’s doesn’t mean they’re made-up jargon – that’s really just how patching works.

But, just because the latest patches have been smaller, that doesn’t mean we haven’t been working on improvements to the game. We commented on some stuff already that we have planned for future patches (to provide a very recent example, here’s some info on [url="http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/7349425431?page=2#39"]Reflects Damage[/url]). In many cases, though, we may not be in position to comment on what the developers are working on, either because they’re still working on the design process or we’re not really sure if what we have is actually going to make it into the game. Over the years we have found it is better to avoid promising anything about future content (until we are as close to 100% certain about it as possible) than to retract previous communication when something gets cut or delayed from a patch, or changed to something completely different. Even acknowledging that an issue exists is enough for some players to walk away with “they know, so something will be done immediately” and can be harmful if said issue’s resolution doesn’t make it into a patch.

Acknowledging community’s concerns is very important, but requires some finesse when we do. Some of you will disagree with that philosophy and for very good reasons. We promise the community team is listening, relaying to development teams and working hard to make sure information is digestible and ready to go as soon as the proverbial light turns green.


The main problem here is you guys are trying to cram TOO MUCH content into a single patch and leaving your community desperately aching for more. Stop trying to release enormous game changing patches and at least give us SOMETHING when you update. You don't have to release every single change all in patch 1.0.7 and feel incredibly accomplished. Put PvP on the back burner and focus on the ACTUAL GAMEPLAY. Get the drops and affixes in order. Get the garbage legendaries in order. It's honestly not that hard. This project needs to seriously consider new management.
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It was a freaking bug fix patch.

What is your alternative, Einstein? That they do not release bug fixes?

Everybody who were upgrading their game from Starter Edition during the Christmas season were not able to play. Nobody cares about your little PvP if they can't even upgrade their game.


I care about the little pvp. We've been caring about this little pvp since May 15th. I think people's concern is justified.
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12/12/2012 04:11 PMPosted by vexorian
Give it up really, it was already known that the PvP patch was going to take ages to come. If you really thought that an announcement for a 10 hours downtime in all of bnet had anything to do with PvP, then it is your fault for being so prone to upping your expectations for no reason.


Ok Troll, whatever you say.
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Diablo III (which doesn’t really have the same content model as something like World of Warcraft, for example).


I know it doesn't nor will it have the same content updates like wow. But the game you released heavily needs new content. Be it an expansion, DLC whatever. What you put out wasn't enough, what you are doing isn't fast enough. Every mechanic in this game needs to be expanded upon exponentially. I think you guys really underestimated the Diablo fanbase greatly as far as how we would blow through the game regardless of how artificially difficult it was, even pre 1.03. The game is shallow.

Basically what I'm saying is and I hate that I even feel this way. But DLC content update system is needed in order for this game to get the proper updates and attention it deserves. The only other option is to release dev toolkits for the modding community to pump out some sweet updates. I don't see that happening though.

Currently, I'm not a satisfied customer. But thanks for all those other games you put out in the past.


On one side, they took in some wow philosophies and implemented in Diablo 3, yet they didn't take it in entirely. Now, what we have is all features in their half performance here and there, making the game looks Diablo but not really Diablo. Philosophies of certain elements as Mmorpg conflicting with that of ARPG's. Such a failed attempt ends up we now have an OK game with genre of its own... standards -- that is, only if they plan on expanding their designs and strengthen them with depths; BUT, they've come to realize that this is not like WoW, they can't afford to add new content to the game like they do for a normal MMORPG because Diablo is meant to be an ARPG... Now, the game is like it's in the middle of a sea unable to touch either shore.

It looks generic and commercial. Such a shame to have made the game like what it is now...
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You can thank WoW that people think this game is too small. I myself am going back to WoW actually, specifically because of content updates, tier system, 5 man dungeons, raiding, stable economy, much better social experience.

D2's size was fine at the time. Blizzard really needs to realize that todays gamer demands much more sophistication then in 2000. A game with no social atmosphere is a flop to me.

This game really needs at least the 5 man dungeons like in WoW with the badge vendor. That alone would fix the bot problem, fix the content problem, fix the multiplayer problem, and much more.
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