Diablo® III

One question for ur dev team

One statement I’ve seen over and over on these forums and elsewhere are proposals for “easy” fixes and overarching assumptions about how long implementation for a variety of changes “should” take.

The reality is, game development is a hugely iterative and time-consuming process, with many people involved along the way. Design takes time, Coding takes time, art takes time, QA takes time: you name it. There are also multiple steps in the pipeline for each and every proposed change and bug fix, no matter how minor, and what issues are being worked on in what order and by who can and do change as new matters arise. Sometimes extra testing is also needed for bugs that come back broken and need to be retested, because we didn't want them to go live with a bad fix.

While there may indeed be a list of known issues and bugs that run alongside some patches, for every one you are aware of, there can be dozens or hundreds being worked on behind-the-scenes that you likely never be aware of. We do things just as quickly as we can, but even then, it’s a process that takes time.


+1.

I just wish you guys posted all the bugs that are known instead of fixing something that you never said is a bug like the Snapshot monk. it was a known tactic for almost 6 months now and bliz never said it's an exploit (never deleted posts about it) and never posted it as a known bug. many of us waited for months to see if anything is done to change this and now after I geared up my monk (less than two weeks ago) and many did so too its "fixed" in 1.07. many of us spent 300 or more millions making that monk to work - yea, for gold buyer players its nothing but for most of us it's a lot of gold and it's the only way a monk can play at high mp and be somehow efficient. if you wouldn't have changed it than the sets would have cost a lot more so it would have evened out with the barb set cost. BTW, A well geared barb can farm faster and nothing is broken with that in blizz eyes.
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they probably have 1 guy coding fixes and 10 others debating whether its fine or not.
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01/22/2013 12:09 PMPosted by kinglouis
they probably have 1 guy coding fixes and 10 others debating whether its fine or not.
I know you weren't serious, but it's closer to the truth than you know. I work for an engineering company and I have to handle paperwork for revision changes on products we make. For example, if you want to change the packaging on a product, once you've decided on the final design, you need approval from:
    the department supervisor: makes the product
    the production manager: assigns labor
    inspection department: inspects the new packaging when it arrives
    manufacturing engineer: decides if any new tools are needed to use the new packaging
    purchasing department: actually buys the new packaging
    marketing: may need to add artwork or printing to the packaging
    VP of Sales: input and approve any cost changes due to the new packaging

Anyone normal person might think, "You don't need all those people, just be smarter and know if the packaging will work or not, then order it." You need all those people because it's cheaper to pay them and do stuff right once than it is to try and fix any mistake from that one "smart" person.

Just like at Blizzard it's easier to go through many iterations and double-checking of any fix and have meetings and planning sessions than it is to let mistakes get released. You've all seen it.
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You're silly.

The problem is that blizz doesn't see problems with the game. Wow. That's disastrous. You know they used to make games 100% complete when they come out? You know they didn't have "updates" and "patches" before? Game companies are so slack these days.

7 years and still needs update is so dumb.
Can't tell if serious.

The ability to easily administer and apply changes and updates is what makes large-scale MMO's, RPG's, FPS's, etc. possible. As much as I like my NES, I'm glad I'm still not playing Battletoads on a daily basis.
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90 Pandaren Priest
0
these 4 words sum it up...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cHoKwqIXjE
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One statement I’ve seen over and over on these forums and elsewhere are proposals for “easy” fixes and overarching assumptions about how long implementation for a variety of changes “should” take.

The reality is, game development is a hugely iterative and time-consuming process, with many people involved along the way. Design takes time, Coding takes time, art takes time, QA takes time: you name it. There are also multiple steps in the pipeline for each and every proposed change and bug fix, no matter how minor, and what issues are being worked on in what order and by who can and do change as new matters arise. Sometimes extra testing is also needed for bugs that come back broken and need to be retested, because we didn't want them to go live with a bad fix.

While there may indeed be a list of known issues and bugs that run alongside some patches, for every one you are aware of, there can be dozens or hundreds being worked on behind-the-scenes that you likely never be aware of. We do things just as quickly as we can, but even then, it’s a process that takes time.


Borderlands 2 came out in September '12 and has already put out three large content packs. Blizzard is being outclassed by the team that put out Duke Nukem Forever.
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One statement I’ve seen over and over on these forums and elsewhere are proposals for “easy” fixes and overarching assumptions about how long implementation for a variety of changes “should” take.

The reality is, game development is a hugely iterative and time-consuming process, with many people involved along the way. Design takes time, Coding takes time, art takes time, QA takes time: you name it. There are also multiple steps in the pipeline for each and every proposed change and bug fix, no matter how minor, and what issues are being worked on in what order and by who can and do change as new matters arise. Sometimes extra testing is also needed for bugs that come back broken and need to be retested, because we didn't want them to go live with a bad fix.

While there may indeed be a list of known issues and bugs that run alongside some patches, for every one you are aware of, there can be dozens or hundreds being worked on behind-the-scenes that you likely never be aware of. We do things just as quickly as we can, but even then, it’s a process that takes time.


As a long time programmer. I thank you for that post.
Edited by Godhimself#1671 on 1/22/2013 2:09 PM PST
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One statement I’ve seen over and over on these forums and elsewhere are proposals for “easy” fixes and overarching assumptions about how long implementation for a variety of changes “should” take.

The reality is, game development is a hugely iterative and time-consuming process, with many people involved along the way. Design takes time, Coding takes time, art takes time, QA takes time: you name it. There are also multiple steps in the pipeline for each and every proposed change and bug fix, no matter how minor, and what issues are being worked on in what order and by who can and do change as new matters arise. Sometimes extra testing is also needed for bugs that come back broken and need to be retested, because we didn't want them to go live with a bad fix.

While there may indeed be a list of known issues and bugs that run alongside some patches, for every one you are aware of, there can be dozens or hundreds being worked on behind-the-scenes that you likely never be aware of. We do things just as quickly as we can, but even then, it’s a process that takes time.


Three things:

1. Your wrong. Game companies do it all the time. The sheer volume of updates that Trion has pumped out for an actual MMORPG called Rift is mind blowing.

2. Diablo 3 has been in development for a very long time, much longer than many other games and its developed by a supposed gaming powerhouse aka Blizzard. The sheer shallowness of the game is mind boggling. It sure isn't a money thing holding blizzard back. 6.3 million box sales as of 23 May 2012 @ an average of $50 bucks per averages to over $300,000,000. If its really taking that long to make new content/come up with ideas/improve the game either blizz is understaffed or incompetent.

3. Your doing nothing but further pissing of your player base by making up repeated excuses for the developers.
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90 Blood Elf Paladin
9880
yea, changing variables and constants takes a lot of effort, chill out...
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because blizzard is just dumb...ask jay wilson....he can't take it anymore and moved on to a new project
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+1.

I just wish you guys posted all the bugs that are known instead of fixing something that you never said is a bug like the Snapshot monk. it was a known tactic for almost 6 months now and bliz never said it's an exploit (never deleted posts about it) and never posted it as a known bug. many of us waited for months to see if anything is done to change this and now after I geared up my monk (less than two weeks ago) and many did so too its "fixed" in 1.07. many of us spent 300 or more millions making that monk to work - yea, for gold buyer players its nothing but for most of us it's a lot of gold and it's the only way a monk can play at high mp and be somehow efficient. if you wouldn't have changed it than the sets would have cost a lot more so it would have evened out with the barb set cost. BTW, A well geared barb can farm faster and nothing is broken with that in blizz eyes.


You're silly.

The problem is that blizz doesn't see problems with the game. Wow. That's disastrous. You know they used to make games 100% complete when they come out? You know they didn't have "updates" and "patches" before? Game companies are so slack these days.

7 years and still needs update is so dumb.


I sure hope you are being sarcastic. Yea, software never had bugs back in the good ole days, especially the stuff for Windows ME.. Diablo I had a patch..

01/22/2013 11:40 PMPosted by Glitter
yea, changing variables and constants takes a lot of effort, chill out...


Oh look at you, you know a programming word so you must understand exactly how this variable impacts every aspect of the code as it ripples through each and every line without any need for regression testing or concerns for game balance. You just change a number, and cross your fingers.... Excellent.
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I've been a programmer in the game industry for about 11 years now. Nothing about Blizzard's patch time for this game strikes me as unreasonably long. MMO patch testing is even harder than normal testing since it involves making changes and coordinating test-server patches and reboots.

The reason why they're taking so long is to make sure that the patch doesn't introduce more problems than it solves. It's a lot different than me taking 10 minutes to code a patch to a crash in a game that runs on a host and a limited number of clients, or a single-player game.
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Microsoft.
Didi u ever played Age of Empire?
I never faced so many updates and server maintenance.
Never.
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90 Blood Elf Mage
3120
01/18/2013 06:43 PMPosted by Ryaskybird


POE, Torchlight 2 and also Diablo 2 had much faster development for his age.


None of those have the quality that Diablo 3 has.

And certainly TL2 doesn't have the staying power. We shall see about PoE.

Sorry but TL2 is better than D3 in every possible way!
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