Diablo® III

Getting clear on why items suck (long)

So it's almost universally agreed upon that itemization in this game is lacking. Everyone seems to have their own pet theory on why, and these often contradict each other. I'll attempt to go over some reasons that are and are not responsible for the item game being lacking. If we expect Blizzard to change the game based on our suggestions, then we at least need to come to some degree of consensus on what the problems really are. I encourage everyone to rip apart anything I say that you don't agree with. Also, the sections are self-contained so by all means just read the ones you think are interesting or wrong. I think 4, 5, 7 and 10 are the most important ones. I may add entries if I realize I've missed some important suggestions.

1. Loot quality & forced AH (not an issue).
2. The auction house (a problem, but not a core issue).
3. Everybody seeking the same stats (not an issue).
4. Lack of affixes and stats (an issue).
5. Cumulative stats (critical issue).
6. Dupes/hacks/bots (not a core issue).
7. Lack of diversity in the types of items available (issue).
8. Weapon damage dependence (issue).
9. Crafting is a failure (issue).
10. Linear item progression (critical issue).
11. Irrelevance of low level items (issue).

1. Loot quality & forced AH use.

I first wish to get this one out of the way, since I see it come up frequently yet I think it's completely incorrect. A common claim is that specifically the quality of loot, as in its effectiveness/power, is too low, forcing people to resort to lame ways to acquire loot (RMAH/GAH/botting/scamming). To refute this claim, one need only to realize that if one defines the quality of loot in terms of what's available elsewhere (such as the GAH), then there is literally nothing Blizzard could do to the loot in this game to improve the quality.

To take a simple example, if Blizzard doubled the quality of all dropped loot, then this would simply double the quality of all the loot that appears on the AH. So dropped loot relative to AH loot would be identical. Thus, loot quality should be defined in terms of its effectiveness in clearing the game's content.

So how effective is loot for this purpose? Well I recently ran a little experiment. I wanted to see how long it would take me to take a character to A3 inferno and acquire enough power to farm with reasonable efficiency (killing champion packs in 10-20 seconds) without using the AH. If you check my profile, this character is my softcore barbarian. After a grand total of 20 hours /played (only 6 hours in inferno), he's efficiently farming A3 inferno using nothing but self-found gear. His gear would be called complete and utter garbage by anyone who complains about loot quality, yet it's good enough for farming a difficulty that was designed specifically to be an extreme challenge. Loot quality is a non-issue. If anything, loot quality is a little too high.

2. The Auction House.

In my opinion, the AH was a huge design mistake for a game like Diablo. I think even the developers have realized this by now. If you spend your gold upgrading your gear on the AH, then the moment you hit 60 you will immediately put your gear at a level where it's almost impossible to find upgrades. With even just 1 million gold, which is easily obtainable by level 60, you can buy sufficiently good gear to farm at a high enough MP to make infernal machine runs efficient. This is a nasty trap for players who don't realize it.

Having said that, there is a rather obvious solution. Don't use the AH. You don't need to, and the game's far more enjoyable without it. So as big of a mistake as this is, and as responsible as it is for a lot of the complaints (people who complain about never finding upgrades invariably are those who used the AH), I don't think this is actually the root of any real problems with the item game. The lack of trading community outside of the AH is an issue, but it's tangential to the point of this thread.

3. Everybody wants the same stats.

This is another common complaint. Everyone wants crit/crit damage/primary stat/vit/all resists/armor/attack speed. While this is an issue, I think it's actually not as severe as it's made out to be. If you look at D2 and D1, you'll see the scenario is really not that different. In D2, everyone wanted vit, (attack speed OR cast speed), all skills, resistances, faster hit recovery, dual leech if melee, and I'm probably forgetting a few. While there was more diversity in D2 in who wanted what stats, the difference is greatly exaggerated. There are, however, some other critical differences, which I do think are relevant and are explored in other sections.

For clarity, I should add that this is specifically about wanting stats in common with everyone else, not the issue that we only want those stats, which is a problem.

4. Lack of affixes/stats.

The game just doesn't have that many different stats/affixes. I argue that this is a significant issue. Hit recovery from D2 is gone. Attack rating is gone. Crushing blow, open wounds, dozens of interesting or important procs, all skills, + specific skills, absorption, item skills, auras, and many other interesting and game changing affixes are just gone, without even remotely sufficient replacement. This makes items inherently less interesting, because the base affixes that everyone wants (primary stat, crit, etc.) are really all there is to look forward to, along with some largely irrelevant ones that just make your items worse. To make matters worse, the value of an affix can be determined almost entirely through how much it increases your DPS on-paper, or your effective hit point pool. Now that's boring.

One thing to note, however, is that even if new affixes were implemented, they would have to compete with existing ones. This leads to the next issue.

5. Cumulative stats.

This is something I don't think I've ever seen mentioned, yet may be one of the biggest underlying problems with the loot system in D3. You can't get enough of crit damage, crit chance, attack speed, your primary stat, vit, all resistance, or armor. Or pretty much any stat (one of the only exceptions is increased gold/health globe radius). What this means is that if a single item for a given item slot (e.g. inna's pants for leggings) rolls a certain affix, let's say attack speed, then every single other item ever designed or rolled for leggings has to compete with attack speed. Every single 2-hander ever rolled or designed has to compete with the crit damage of skorn. Let's look at D2.

Everybody wants resistances. Everybody wants attack speed (or cast speed, if a caster). BUT those are only effective to a cap. Resistances have a hard cap of 75. Attack/cast speed has breakpoints, and is only effective up to a point. In fact, almost all stats in D2 are like this. What this means, crucially, is that you only need enough of your items to have those stats as is needed up to cap. In D2, resistance was very common in large amounts on shields. If stats were like D3, then shields with no resistances would see very little use. But because of the hard cap, you can get all the resistance you need from other item slots or skills. Thus if you find an awesome new shield that has no resistances, it isn't automatically garbage.

Suppose D3 adopted this. Then suddenly, a weapon largely comparable to Skorn but without the crit damage isn't automatically garbage. If it has an awesome affix on it that you want to use, then you could get your crit damage from other item slots. Furthermore, once you had enough of core, base stats that are essential to your character, you'd be free to acquire interesting and flavourful affixes that seem most appealing to you. Without something like a cap, or sharp diminishing returns, then even if Blizzard implemented new interesting affixes, they would have to compete with existing ones.

6. Dupes/hacks/bots.

While these are certainly issues and Blizzard must take active measures against them, I don't think anyone can argue that these issues are worse in D3 than in D2.

7. Lack of item type diversity.

Diablo 3 has no charms, no jewels, no elixirs, only one type of potion, no runes, and no new item types at all except for crafting tomes. Furthermore, gems are even less diverse than in D2 (how the heck did that happen?) While I don't think the lack of any specific item type from D2 is an issue, the fact that there aren't ANY new item types, beyond tomes for crafting, is an issue. There are many, many things Blizzard could have done here. But it seems all ideas were scrapped, probably mostly due to inventory issues. There are plenty of new items one could implement with their own various pros and cons. The point is that in an item game, there should really be more kinds of things dropping.

8. Weapon damage dependence.

This is a common complaint, and one I think is correct. Aside from making items more homogenized, it also greatly reduces the pool of potentially viable items. There are obvious ways in which it does this: a weapon that rolls no damage affixes and thus has only 200 dps is not going to be viable. Period. (There actually might be exactly one exception when it comes to barbarian off-hands, but the point stands). This is in stark contrast with D2 where item damage was important but didn't decide an item's worth. Not only did casters make use of lower damage items, but item damage wasn't even decisive for melee characters.

An Azurewrath had significantly less DPS on it than, say, a breath of the dying berserker axe, yet a zeal/fanaticism paladin would actually clear more efficiently with an Azurewrath. This is because the 250-500 cold damage and 250-500 magic damage (stats which didn't affect skill damage in D2, unlike in D3) meant that this weapon would be highly effective even against enemies that were highly resistant to physical damage. But in D3, Azurewrath has low base DPS so it's garbage, every time (except maybe for Kormac). There are other ways low damage weapons can be highly effective as well, such as through crushing blow, which did damage independent of your character's stats.

9. Crafting is a complete failure.

As limited and underutilized as crafting was in D2, it actually played a bigger role in D2 than D3's crafting does in its own game. D3's crafting suffers from both fundamental design issues and fairly basic implementation issues.

First of all, the items are bad even compared to what you get from drops. My barbarian spent over 500k gold and tons of crafting mats trying to upgrade a level 55 helm with less than 100 vit, less than 30 all resists and a socket. No dice. Not a single upgrade. This doesn't even consider what you could get off the AH for 10k gold. So if nothing else, crafting simply needs a buff.

But more importantly, the fact that crafting is 100% randomized is a design flaw. Given the extreme inherent randomness of dropped loot, it seems odd to implement a form of crafting which just gives you more 100% randomness. Even in D2 crafting was thematic in the sense that you'd get a few guaranteed affixes and some random ones on top of it. This allowed you to target a specific item slot which is lacking, and craft something that you know will at least have some relevant affixes.

This can be summarized as follows: D3's crafting is just gambling from D2, yet even more limited. You pick an item type, pay a large amount of gold, and get something completely random. 99+% of the time you get something that you immediately vendor/salvage, but you might get lucky and get something genuinely useful. But in D2, you could get uniques/set items from gambling, and gold in that game held virtually no value outside of gambling/repairing. In D3 not only is gold a valuable currency but you get only rares. As hard as it is to believe, D3's crafting is actually an even more restricted version of D2's gambling.

10. Linear nature of item progression.

There are two differences between a fresh 60 and a 60 who is fully twinked out. The twinked out 60 does more damage and takes less damage. This ties into the lack of affixes/stats, but could in principle be addressed in a number of different ways, not necessarily related to items. In D2 getting new/better gear could fundamentally change the way your character operated. It could turn a barbarian into a werewolf, a necromancer into an undead caster with the fireball spell, or less dramatically, it could give you an aura, make you entirely immune to freeze, allow you to leech life off of enemies you normally couldn't, give you new spells, etc. This is almost completely missing in D3. A few affixes of uniques have dramatic effects, but very few.

11. Irrelevance of low level items.

With literally one exception (leoric's signet), items found in normal through hell tend to be useful only for leveling. This is in sharp contrast with Diablo 2 for several reasons: in D2 you needed low level runes for high level runewords, there were awesome charms even at low levels, some low level uniques had affixes that made them useful even in hell (crushing blow, immune to freeze, etc), and many endgame items were simply lower level items that could be found throughout nightmare. In D3 the linear scaling of affixes and heavy power scaling means inferno level loot will greatly outclass hell loot will greatly outlcass nightmare loot will greatly outclass normal loot. Together with the lack of potent affixes, this means low level loot simply can't compete with higher level loot.

The reason that this is a problem is that it greatly reduces motivation to reroll. In D2, one of the more entertaining things you can do is to just start over from scratch with some friends and plow through the game. Knowing in advance that you definitely won't find anything valuable until you're at endgame again is demotivating. This is also especially troublesome for hardcore mode, as it means that when you die and reroll, you're wasting time by leveling instead of farming endgame.
Edited by Saigyouji#1546 on 2/2/2013 8:29 AM PST
Reply Quote
No responses? Would think people would object to my claim that neither the AH nor the quality of item drops are relevant to why the item game in D3 is bad.
Reply Quote
I agree with your post. unfortunately, overanalyzing a game designed to solely be an AH sim/limited virtual sandbox won't get us anywhere. We all want d3 to be more that it was designed to be and is atm--but that won't happen. I've accepted that this game was designed to offer a casual, fun yet short experience--and designed to center completely around maximising RMAH profits. I still find time to enjoy myself in d3, usually in short bursts.
Reply Quote
I've accepted that this game was designed to offer a casual, fun yet short experience

-and designed to center completely around maximising RMAH profits.


Aren't these contradictory design goals? Even if their sole desire was to maximize RMAH profits, wouldn't it be in their financial interest to ensure that people continue playing? My assessment of what the main problems are focuses on things that could be addressed without interfering with the RMAH. Things like caps or diminishing returns on singular stats like attributes, crit damage, or resistances - surely the way to maximize RMAH profits would be to implement, with respect to this issue, whichever happens to make the game most enjoyable. After all, the more people play the game, the more they'll be tempted to use the RMAH.
Reply Quote
01/26/2013 01:36 PMPosted by Saigyouji
Aren't these contradictory design goals? Even if their sole desire was to maximize RMAH profits, wouldn't it be in their financial interest to ensure that people continue playing?


you would think so right. Clearly they released this game prematurely to buffer the dwindling wow subscriptions. With no end game and monotonous, lackluster replayability (act 3 to infinity) it is obvious that the devs didn't take any real measures to ensure longer playtimes. The whole risk/reward system that should be tied to time played is broken and at the mercy of awful rng as well. They really missed an opportunity to further profit from maximum playtimes/playerbase.
Reply Quote
Drops suck simple because the affixes are way too random. D3 went for a 'pinata' style loot system where they thought people would be happy seeing monsters explode scattering a bunch of junk. That's something none of us wanted.

They should have had tighter affixes, INT shouldn't be on barb gear ffs, or DH only skill on a weapon they can't even use, etc... It's just completely horrible. Any dev with experience could have seen this as being terrible itemization.

What should have happened:

Magic items- more common drops with limits. Not limits that made them complete crap but limits so they couldn't be better than a rare.

Rares- Should have been RARE... Why even call them rare. They should have been rare with a drop rate a fraction better than what current legs are at. They should also be decent and none absolutely suck.

Legendaries- Always always always should be great to awesome. They should have been special and drop at an extremely low rate. Less than the rate they drop at now.

If it had happened like I described- well we wouldn't even be having this conversation.
Reply Quote
01/26/2013 11:06 AMPosted by Saigyouji
In my opinion, the AH was a huge design mistake for a game like Diablo.


Been thinking that since May last year.

Great post, I liked. I have nothing to add at the moment as I'm dead tired, thanks for contributing though.
Edited by Cryogen#1749 on 1/26/2013 4:32 PM PST
Reply Quote
Posts: 121
Excellent post.

I feel that what you mention about cumulative stats is spot on - that was what the itemization in D2 was all about, hitting those soft and hard caps as effectively as possible.

If changes could be made to implement similar caps on certain stats in D3 I'm positive you would almost instantly see a much more diverse pool of what players would call viable loot.
Reply Quote
Posts: 121
I feel that this post deserves a bump in hopes that a blue might stumble upon this man's thoughts concerning stat diminishing returns and breakpoints (section 5).

This interesting aspect of itemization is definitely why gear choices lack viable variety in D3.
Reply Quote
itemization isn't lacking
Reply Quote
Posts: 121
Did you even read that section?
Reply Quote
Certain stats such as armor and resistances do have diminishing returns. However, the diminishing returns isn't as obvious now because monster damages were nerfed multiple times (to satisfy people who complain and complain, omg not enough drop etc.)

Go farm up to paragon 50 and say you don't get enough drops for upgrades. I dare you.
Reply Quote
Posts: 121
You are missing the point.

I'm not talking about finding your own upgrades or diminishing returns on something like armor.

Resistances do have diminishing returns, but nothing like the hard cap you saw in D2. Since you didn't read the section either I'll reiterate the point: adding soft and hard caps to stats like crit chance and attack speed would make gearing a character more interesting than good trifecta rolls when you can and as close as you can get otherwise. Sure this would require some interesting tweaks to stats as they are, but IMO choosing gear to meet those soft and hard caps on D2 is what made itemization fun. You chose which caps you intended to hit through the gear you chose, you didn't just stack as much of the best stats as you possibly could.

Again, its not about a lack of good items available. It's about making loot and gearing a character more interesting, and I think this particular point will become more apparent as PvP shows its face, as these caps and breakpoints were a large part of PvP in D2.
Reply Quote
Another issue that occurs to me is the irrelevance of items in the leveling stages of the game. With literally one exception (leoric's signet), items found in normal through hell tend to be useful only for leveling. This is in sharp contrast with Diablo 2 for several reasons: in D2 you needed low level runes for high level runewords, there were awesome charms even at low levels, some low level uniques had affixes that made them useful even in hell (crushing blow, immune to freeze, etc), and many endgame items were simply lower level items that could be found throughout nightmare. In D3 the linear scaling of affixes and heavy power scaling means inferno level loot will greatly outclass hell loot will greatly outlcass nightmare loot will greatly outclass normal loot. Together with the lack of potent affixes, this means low level loot simply can't compete with higher level loot.

The reason that this is a problem is that it greatly reduces motivation to reroll. In D2, one of the more entertaining things you can do is to just start over from scratch with some friends and plow through the game. Knowing in advance that you definitely won't find anything valuable until you're at endgame again is demotivating. This is also especially troublesome for hardcore mode, as it means that when you die and reroll, you're wasting time by leveling instead of farming endgame.

What should have happened:

Magic items- more common drops with limits. Not limits that made them complete crap but limits so they couldn't be better than a rare.

Rares- Should have been RARE... Why even call them rare. They should have been rare with a drop rate a fraction better than what current legs are at. They should also be decent and none absolutely suck.

Legendaries- Always always always should be great to awesome. They should have been special and drop at an extremely low rate. Less than the rate they drop at now.

If it had happened like I described- well we wouldn't even be having this conversation.


I disagree. While I think the style of flooding the player with items does have an unfortunate consequence (namely, it forces you to go through a disproportionately large number of items before you see something potentially useful), I don't think it makes or breaks the item issues. Itemization would still be bland, predictable and suffering from all of the problems I pointed out.
Reply Quote
Very good thread. I haven't been able to read through it all yet, but you make some interesting observations particularly with your points on cumulative stats. I think this issue must be addressed or we're stuck with a small bunch of items being useful with every new group introduced. Which is a bleak outlook.
Reply Quote
Great, great post. I do not agree with everything, but every point addressed real issues and in my opinion the solutions were either pretty spot on, or going the right direction.

The things I am not sure about was the proposed returns to caps, soft or hard. This may be the best way to get diversity, but I am not sure. If other issues were addressed like having more unique itemization that could cater to more unique builds, and Blizzard kept tweaking stats until they had not only better balance, but also more clear incentive to choose certain stats for certain build I would hope that we would not need caps. It just feels like its putting an artificial limit on our creativity. It would be hard I am sure to find that balance but I would rather that route first.

The other issue is the crafting. Remember, crafting was very viable prior to 1.0.4. It was the flood of buffed items, and the endless buffing after that, that killed crafting. It was not the random nature, it was just that crafted items could no longer compete. Even being completely random, you could sell your good rolls and keep trying until you got the rolls you needed.

I know it seems harmless to allow targeted rolls, but that takes out at a minimum 1/6th of the rng of the roll. That makes crafting 6 times more likely to get you an item you want vs drops at a minimum. There is also the added fact that its already 6 affix vs 4/5/6 potential. That is huge, and hard to balance to not make crafting overpowered vs loot. This is probably why the new crafting is BoA, because frankly its too strong vs random loot.

Again, I would think that fixing some of the other issues could fix crafting as well. It must competitive or it will die, but it should be interesting as well. Something like making sure it was able to roll at the same capability as dropped items, but adding x brimstones and extra gold could guarantee an extra "cool" affix. Like some of the on hit abilities of legs, or class specific skill increases etc. There are tons of potential ideas, just as long as they are interesting and fun, but not out of balance with drops crafting would be good.
Reply Quote
MVP
Posts: 19,865
View profile
This is an excellent post and very well articulates the main flaws that I also see with Diablo III's loot system.

There isn't a diverse number of stats to choose from. Regardless of who you are you always want IAS, Crit, Crit Damage.

IMO you should choose between a large array of viable stats that equally perform as they increase.

Anything other than cold damage is inherently useless.

Certain legendary items can roll stats that CANNOT be found on rare items EVER.

All in all, you've hit just about every nail directly on the head.
________________________________________________
MVP's are not employees of Blizzard Entertainment. We are players just like you.
Nothing I say is Official word from Blizzard, everything is of my own conjecture.
I don't have moderation powers. Finally, I am not a Blizzard Public Relations Representative.
MVP FAQ: http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/4038704716#2
Reply Quote
The things I am not sure about was the proposed returns to caps, soft or hard. This may be the best way to get diversity, but I am not sure. If other issues were addressed like having more unique itemization that could cater to more unique builds, and Blizzard kept tweaking stats until they had not only better balance, but also more clear incentive to choose certain stats for certain build I would hope that we would not need caps. It just feels like its putting an artificial limit on our creativity. It would be hard I am sure to find that balance but I would rather that route first.


The problem with merely adding more interesting stats/affixes/items is that they have to compete with existing ones. Suppose you were designing a new 2-hander for barbs. Do you give it massive crit damage and strength? If not, then why should a barb use it instead of the easily obtainable Skorn? It doesn't matter how neat the properties of that weapon are, the damage loss associated with missing 150+ crit damage is downright insane. It's not that you're going to be 5% less effective with the new weapon, your damage will tank severely. As a result, you're severely constrained in your ability to design new items. It's not that it's impossible to make each item sufficiently powerful in its own right to compete with existing items, it's that having caps or diminishing returns substantially loosens the constraints on the viability of potential items in general.

The other issue is the crafting. Remember, crafting was very viable prior to 1.0.4. It was the flood of buffed items, and the endless buffing after that, that killed crafting. It was not the random nature, it was just that crafted items could no longer compete. Even being completely random, you could sell your good rolls and keep trying until you got the rolls you needed.


I agree, it's possible for crafting to be alive without removing any randomization. At the very least, it just needs to be put back on pair with the buffed items post 1.04. I'd specify two reasons why I think randomization is an issue with crafting. One is that the extent of the randomization makes it very difficult to obtain upgrades without investing an enormous amount of resources into it. Killing monsters is something done for its own sake - it's okay to kill a bunch of things and not find upgrades. But crafting is done specifically to obtain loot. As I mentioned in the original post, my barbarian made it all the way through inferno trying to upgrade his terrible helm with ~60 vit, ~30 AR, and a socket, to no avail. That was a frustrating experience.

The other reason is that some form of targeted item acquisition should be in the game. If RNG poops on your player (like it did to my barb with the helm issue) then it's nice to have the opportunity to craft something with at least some useful base stats so you're likely to get something usable, even if it's not amazing. I rerolled a lot of characters in D2, and did a lot of self-found-only hardcore runs through hell at-level, and the crafting in that game was downright invaluable. Runewords also contributed to this, in that they let you construct specific items. But the only even remotely comparable source of items in D3 is vendor loot, which are downright inferior.

I know it seems harmless to allow targeted rolls, but that takes out at a minimum 1/6th of the rng of the roll. That makes crafting 6 times more likely to get you an item you want vs drops at a minimum. There is also the added fact that its already 6 affix vs 4/5/6 potential. That is huge, and hard to balance to not make crafting overpowered vs loot. This is probably why the new crafting is BoA, because frankly its too strong vs random loot.


That's why I don't think such items should have 6 affixes. Maybe two specific affixes plus two random ones, or 4-5 random ones from a restricted pool of affixes. Alternatively, retain 6 affixes but make crafting a much bigger deal (i.e. requiring more resources). Fewer, better but more expensive crafts are better than spamming the craft button 100+ times and salvaging 99+ of your items. This seem to be going in this latter direction with the new crafting, but I still think it has too much randomness in it. Though I should point out that it isn't necessarily the case that all crafting should be less random. I just think they should also implement a more targeted form of item acquisition as well, and crafting seems a natural means for this.

Having said that, if they did implement some of the other changes, then improvements to crafting might require very different implementations. If they expanded the pool of affixes, for example, then the randomization would become more severe. If they added caps/diminishing returns, then randomization would become less severe (since you don't have affixes that MUST roll on the item for it to be useful).

Whatever they do to crafting, it'll have to piggyback on whatever changes they make to itemization in general.
Edited by Saigyouji#1546 on 1/27/2013 10:38 AM PST
Reply Quote
01/27/2013 10:26 AMPosted by Saigyouji
The problem with merely adding more interesting stats/affixes/items is that they have to compete with existing ones. Suppose you were designing a new 2-hander for barbs. Do you give it massive crit damage and strength? If not, then why should a barb use it instead of the easily obtainable Skorn? It doesn't matter how neat the properties of that weapon are, the damage loss associated with missing 150+ crit damage is downright insane. It's not that you're going to be 5% less effective with the new weapon, your damage will tank severely. As a result, you're severely constrained in your ability to design new items. It's not that it's impossible to make each item sufficiently powerful in its own right to compete with existing items, it's that having caps or diminishing returns substantially loosens the constraints on the viability of potential items in general.


Yeah. As I said, it may be right that some sort of caps work the best. I just hope there is another way. And as bad a word that it is, nerfs may be necessary to achieve balance. When they nerfed ias, crit/cd was already more powerful than ias, people were just not aware of it yet. Now there is no other stat that compares, and builds have been catered to high crit, not just for damage but for procs. Caps or nerfs, any adjustment to crit is going to be painful and cause an uproar. But alas, something should be done.

A cd cap seems the least harmful, and would open up a lot. The only thing I worry about is going down a road of too many caps, in which every build just stats up to each cap, and diversity is even less rather than more.

01/27/2013 10:26 AMPosted by Saigyouji
I just think they should also implement a more targeted form of item acquisition as well, and crafting seems a natural means for this.


I understand why some amount of stat targeting can be fun. And if we had a lot more options of diversity on our stats it would take some of overpowered out of stat targeting in crafting. Balancing could still be tough though. If we traded a bit of power from crafted items for a bit more control in outcome over time, with gear saturation, crafting would likely again become obsolete. With equal power and customization crafting again become the clear choice for gear.

It is a tough area, but ultimately fixing the other problems would probably make the crafting issue much more clear. I agree about the need to remove 1000 crafts and 999 salvages, just as I agree that should be removed from drops. Tighter stat ranges (but again with more interesting itemization options) and less drops for later would help. If that were the case, then you have a good case for higher cost, and some customization in outcome crafting. It would keep a better balance.
Reply Quote

Please report any Code of Conduct violations, including:

Threats of violence. We take these seriously and will alert the proper authorities.

Posts containing personal information about other players. This includes physical addresses, e-mail addresses, phone numbers, and inappropriate photos and/or videos.

Harassing or discriminatory language. This will not be tolerated.

Forums Code of Conduct

Report Post # written by

Reason
Explain (256 characters max)

Reported!

[Close]