Diablo® III

Intel Core i5 vs i7

I'm looking at getting a new PC so I'm trying to decide if the additional cost of an i7 over the i5 is worth whatever performance boost the i7 can provide.

By the way, I already have nVidia 550ti 2gig. I will not be upgrading this any time soon probably.

I probably will not upgrade the graphics card for sometime. I am currently bottlenecked by my ancient 2005 processor (and slower ram/HD speed but those are slight compared to processor). However, if I got an i7 would I be bottlenecked on the graphics card?
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no point in I7, Multi threading is not used in gaming so go with an I5
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When looking at price vs. performance it's also important to keep in mind what exactly you'll be using the computer for. Some games are heavier on the processor, while others are better at getting the most out of a graphics card, and exactly how important is it to be able to play Crysis 3 on omgwtfbbq settings rather than above average settings.

That said, if you compare equivalent i5 and i7 processors (let's say the i5-3570K to the i7-3770K since they're both pretty popular versions) you'll notice the main improvements in the i7 are a (very slightly) improved clock speed and 2 more megabytes of L3 cache memory. The increased cache memory is probably the biggest contributor to better performance over an i5, but it's still not really a big difference in most cases.

The unique feature the i7 boasts is "Hyperthreading Support," which essentially means that instead of 4 cores running at 3.5GHz you could also consider it to be 8 cores running at 1.75 GHz because each processor core can run two threads at once (oversimplification, but it gets the idea across). The thing you have to understand about this is that it does NOTHING to increase the total processing power of the chip; it just lets you do more things simultaneously. Unless you're trying to run multiple instances of a game at one time while encoding videos and running a virus scan on your computer it's unlikely that Hyperthreading will ever do much for you.

TLDR: So unless you're a serious multitasker (and I'm talking like 5+ intensive tasks at the same time) I think you would be better off saving about a hundred bucks and getting a good i5 processor. If you look at benchmarks that just measure pure processing capability, an i5 running at the same speed as an equivalent i7 is basically neck and neck.

Note: I don't profess to be an expert by any stretch of the imagination and this is all from my own research necessitated from building computers for friends and co-workers. Anyone else with a different opinion is welcome to share/discuss.
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If you go with i5, find the one with k like 2500k or 3570k. Those are overclockable, even if you not interested on overclocking now, 2-3 years from now, it will be an option instead of changing/upgrading computer.
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i play PoE, vindictus & dota concurrently and facebook and read e-mail and forum here <- i7
i5 -> i'm focused in playing 1 session of gamenamehere.
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If your comp is a workstation or is for heavy multitasking, get an i7.
If your comp is purely for gaming, get an i5.
Edited by Hypersonic#1142 on 2/11/2013 4:06 AM PST
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I agree with Geljorgum that the i5 is the best bang for your buck when it comes to games.

The i5-2500K goes for $219.99 while the i7-3570K is only $10 more at $229.99 (got these prices from Newegg). There's actually a $15 less promo for the i5-3570K but it ends today (Feb. 11, 2013).

Both perform virtually identical in gaming performance. The difference is that the 3570K has native USB 3.0 and PCIE-3.0.
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I agree with Geljorgum that the i5 is the best bang for your buck when it comes to games.

The i5-2500K goes for $219.99 while the i7-3570K is only $10 more at $229.99 (got these prices from Newegg). There's actually a $15 less promo for the i5-3570K but it ends today (Feb. 11, 2013).

Both perform virtually identical in gaming performance. The difference is that the 3570K has native USB 3.0 and PCIE-3.0.


I heard that i5-3570k are more difficult to overclock (they tend to have more heat) compared to i5-2500k, is this true ?
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I'm not sure about "more difficult to overclock" but yes, the 3570K gets to be 20ºC hotter than a 2500K when overclocked.

Here's the detailed report (http://www.tomshardware.com/news/ivy-bridge-overclocking-high-temp,15512.html).
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