Diablo® III

[Game Quality] Armor Customization, Transmutation

04/30/2013 04:31 PMPosted by venveng
Kids now are like "Me want now now now waaaa waaaa!!. Seriously Blizz, take all the time needed to improve this game. Not all players here are impatient and also I for one understand the weight and work needed to implement such changes.


yes some kids are like that, but some people just want answers that are a bit more concrete. we understand that they can't always give us an estimate when they can implement a change but even a guesstimate would be appreciated by a few but not all of course, some people will just whine.
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Community Manager
04/30/2013 04:25 PMPosted by Griever
Otherwise, how much of D3s development is taken by the console ports, is it sensible to believe it slows down the updates or both are completly independent entities?


We know there is a concern among some players that working on the console version of Diablo III takes away from PC development, but thankfully that's not the case. They are entirely separate teams with individual content cycles. Lylirra made some comments about this issue in this thread, and this one. I'll quote a few of her comments below.

03/29/2013 10:24 AMPosted by Lylirra
Our plan is to continue using staggered development, which means the PC version and the console version will have their own separate development teams and cycles.


02/25/2013 05:06 PMPosted by Lylirra
Beyond that, we actually have an independent team of designers, engineers, artists, and producers that are dedicated to adapting Diablo III to the PlayStation and creating an epic console experience. It's their job to take the PC game and translate it to the PS3, and in a way deal with all the considerations you're talking about. While our console team and PC team do collaborate (and have collaborated in the past), it's always to ensure that we’re staying true to D3 on the PlayStation platform.
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IN terms of augments.
If you could pick one stat to sacrifice on gear to add a single socket, it would GREATLY enhance a lot of gear options. Lots of yellows that drop that are OK could suddenly become amazing because of a single crappy stat.

It might even push players back into using non legendaries in some cases.

Of course I doubt blizzard would do this, until after a great re-itemization push, where the other mods were actually made useful instead of everybody just dropping thorns and gold-pickup.
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This is what Blizzard means when they say that they're exploring this idea for 'future' updates.

You want us to make vanity items? YOU'RE GONNA HAVE TO BUY OUR EXPANSION, MWAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!
Edited by Mickit#1817 on 4/30/2013 5:13 PM PDT
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04/30/2013 05:03 PMPosted by Grimiku
Otherwise, how much of D3s development is taken by the console ports, is it sensible to believe it slows down the updates or both are completly independent entities?


We know there is a concern among some players that working on the console version of Diablo III takes away from PC development, but thankfully that's not the case. They are entirely separate teams with individual content cycles. Lylirra made some comments about this issue in this [url="http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/8197591084?page=2#25"]thread[/url], and [url="http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/7979938071"]this one[/url]. I'll quote a few of her comments below.

Our plan is to continue using staggered development, which means the PC version and the console version will have their own separate development teams and cycles.


Beyond that, we actually have an independent team of designers, engineers, artists, and producers that are dedicated to adapting Diablo III to the PlayStation and creating an epic console experience. It's their job to take the PC game and translate it to the PS3, and in a way deal with all the considerations you're talking about. While our console team and PC team do collaborate (and have collaborated in the past), it's always to ensure that we’re staying true to D3 on the PlayStation platform.


Thanks, i've only came back recently and didn't see these posts.
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just let players add sockets.
cost 10m per socket rising exponentially by a factor of 10. up to a max of 4 sockets
1st socket 10m
2nd socket 100m
3rd socket 1b
4th socket 10b

gear becomes boa
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this is like the second post i see where blizz actually says:
!@#$ the community,
you must be happy being able to play our awesome game

i think it should be the other way around,
%^-* what blizz thinks,
listen to ur customers,
and certainly dont slack them off like in this post
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Grimiku I think the problem is, and that you still didn't address here is why there isn't even a general timeframe like "This year" or "In the coming months (meaning 1-3mo)" and so on when we get blue post's that cover certain topics.

Timeframes are a comitment yes, but a general timeframe should be predictable in most cases.

Players would enjoy seeing what I've mentioned instead of something that sounds like this "WE HAVE NO CLUE AND EVERYONE PANIC"
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this is like the second post i see where blizz actually says:
!@#$ the community,
you must be happy being able to play our awesome game

i think it should be the other way around,
%^-* what blizz thinks,
listen to ur customers,
and certainly dont slack them off like in this post


Have you just got out of your rock? They have been doing that since release and look what Diablo 3 is now. Some changes were good but some were really bad because they listened to much. Inferno vanilla was more rewarding to progress. The sheer amount of frustration and challenge was so overwhelming, it drive most casual player to cry and whine and now they lurk the forums and even on the facebook fanpage just to spat insults and bash like there's no tomorrow. I hope Blizz realize this that not everytime a small group of players cry means something is wrong. I say !@#$ this community and just let the devs do their jobs without pressure. The more time they spend on perfecting this game means the more polish it will come out at the end.
Edited by venveng#1906 on 5/1/2013 12:09 AM PDT
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I’m sure you already have people thinking about it, but here is an idea how the transmute feature can work in Diablo.

To transmute you need 2 items of the same type, item A is the one with the stats you want to keep and item B is the one with the look you want to have.

When you transmute these 2 items they both get destroyed and you get item C which look like item B but have all stats from item A. In addition item C can be Account Bound and/or you can choose the name for it.
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I know there is a lot of criticism about sentences like "something we talk about in the office" or "it's something were working on", and the solution everyone wants are faster updates. I think we'd all love for the patching process to be quicker (that’s kind of like saying “who doesn’t want free stuff?”), but the fact is: patches aren’t created in a vacuum, and it’s really not as simple as you might think.

Seemingly simple changes usually have a lot of work associated with them, and it’s easy to underestimate the complicated nature of the work involved. New content has to be coded, implemented, assigned art assets (sometimes), have a test environment built for it, tested until its right, and then we rinse and repeat that process each time we iterate. After that, we need to coordinate a release on a global level, make sure everything is localized, and then deploy to the live game (which is not just a flick of a switch). That isn’t to say we can’t do better, and we’re always working on ways to improve, but my point is this shouldn’t be trivialized. It’s a disservice to your feedback and this discussion to do that.

We also tend to use flexible language when talking about changes that aren’t ironed out yet or have a timeline for when they’ll be implemented. That way, we can talk about what we’re working on and acknowledge ideas/issues even if we don’t have a lot of details to discuss (i.e. we may not always know when a particular change is going to make it into the game or how it will manifest, but that doesn’t mean we can’t talk about it). While that may not be your ideal scenario, we prefer it over staying quiet since it keeps the community more involved. Just some food for thought.

- reducing the quantitiy of drops and improving the quality ist a very simple change, all you have to do is adjusting some numbers and then test ist for 2 weeks
- adding bonuses to all sorts of items is a simple change, you already had it in the beta:
http://www.diablowiki.net/index.php?title=Mystic&oldid=46245
all you have to do is look at your old sources and copypast some code and then test it for 4 weeks
- adding charms is simple, you already had it in the beta:
http://www.diablowiki.net/index.php?title=Talisman&oldid=30385
all you have to do is look at your old sources and copypast some code and then test it for 3 weeks

I understand that you want cool ideas for the expansion but the game needs a change now not next year
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I know there is a lot of criticism about sentences like "something we talk about in the office" or "it's something were working on", and the solution everyone wants are faster updates. I think we'd all love for the patching process to be quicker (that’s kind of like saying “who doesn’t want free stuff?”), but the fact is: patches aren’t created in a vacuum, and it’s really not as simple as you might think.

Seemingly simple changes usually have a lot of work associated with them, and it’s easy to underestimate the complicated nature of the work involved. New content has to be coded, implemented, assigned art assets (sometimes), have a test environment built for it, tested until its right, and then we rinse and repeat that process each time we iterate. After that, we need to coordinate a release on a global level, make sure everything is localized, and then deploy to the live game (which is not just a flick of a switch). That isn’t to say we can’t do better, and we’re always working on ways to improve, but my point is this shouldn’t be trivialized. It’s a disservice to your feedback and this discussion to do that.

We also tend to use flexible language when talking about changes that aren’t ironed out yet or have a timeline for when they’ll be implemented. That way, we can talk about what we’re working on and acknowledge ideas/issues even if we don’t have a lot of details to discuss (i.e. we may not always know when a particular change is going to make it into the game or how it will manifest, but that doesn’t mean we can’t talk about it). While that may not be your ideal scenario, we prefer it over staying quiet since it keeps the community more involved. Just some food for thought.


Well, we've talked a lot about this post in the office and it's definitely something we want to address at a later stage. I'm just coming out of a meeting where the general sentiment was that a brief, slightly dismissive reply should be crafted at once - and when I meet the guys from Forum Communication next week, after they have returned from group therapy, I will most certainly insist that they design a first draft for all of us to review. I'm pretty confident that not more than half a dozen iterations will be required in order to end up with a snappy, polished text that will most certainly zing the above quote very sharply. I can't make any promises about this yet, but I am commited and passionate about this nevertheless. It's super complex to do stuff, you must realize that, but look forward to an official action about this as early as mid-november of this year.
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04/30/2013 05:03 PMPosted by Grimiku
Otherwise, how much of D3s development is taken by the console ports, is it sensible to believe it slows down the updates or both are completly independent entities?


We know there is a concern among some players that working on the console version of Diablo III takes away from PC development, but thankfully that's not the case. They are entirely separate teams with individual content cycles. Lylirra made some comments about this issue in this [url="http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/8197591084?page=2#25"]thread[/url], and [url="http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/7979938071"]this one[/url]. I'll quote a few of her comments below.

Our plan is to continue using staggered development, which means the PC version and the console version will have their own separate development teams and cycles.


Beyond that, we actually have an independent team of designers, engineers, artists, and producers that are dedicated to adapting Diablo III to the PlayStation and creating an epic console experience. It's their job to take the PC game and translate it to the PS3, and in a way deal with all the considerations you're talking about. While our console team and PC team do collaborate (and have collaborated in the past), it's always to ensure that we’re staying true to D3 on the PlayStation platform.


While that seems good in theory to you, it makes next to no sense to do it that way.

The game is the same. Same story, same levels, same quest, same maps, same classes. Why would you balance them differently and spend the money to pay two entirely separate teams to balance and create additions to the game?
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