A Wizard's Guide to Effective Health (Charts)

Wizard
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Some of you might be wondering. What is this effective health you speak of?

Well, in short effectively maximizing your survivability does not directly correlate to having a massive health pool. In other words, grabbing every last bit of vitality on every single piece of gear might hurt you more than help you in the long run. Sure, I can gear to have 100,000 hit points, but is that really going to help me survive better by itself?

But one may ask, how is having a massive health pool hurtful to me? Well, by itself it's not. However ignoring other soruces of mitigation is.

- Effective Health -

So what is this magical effective health I speak of? Well, effective health is essentially balancing your health pool with your defensive stats.

If I take 50% less damage, my health pool has effectively doubled in size!

Well, how is that?

Let's say you take 3 hits for 10,000 damage each. Let's also say you have a health pool of 30,000 health.

10,000 * 3 = 30,000

So in those three hits you have just died.

Well, let's say your mitigational rating value is 50%. Meaning, you now take 50% less damage from incoming attacks.

(10,000 * .5) * 3 = 15,000

You can now soak up those 3 hits more effectively meaning you can now take twice as many hits and live with the same health pool!

- Mitigation: Your little percentage based helper -


What is mitigation? Well, mitigation is the effective use of other stats to help you take less damage. Less incoming damage results in having more effective health. Mitigation and larger health pools go hand in hand. You gear for a larger health pool to help you surivive, then you gear for other mitigational stats to help you reduce the incoming damage to smaller amounts. Smaller amounts of damage means more hits you can survive!

Here's a quick list of the different types of mitigation.

- Armor -

Armor is your biggest piece of damage mitigation. Every piece of gear you wear gives you an armor rating. If you tally up the total amount of armor you now have your armor rating.

You may also obtain armor from items with strength on them. Effectively, every point of strength equals exactly one point of armor. While strength is not a directly essential stat for a Wizard, Strength can help you effectively raise your armor pool.

Here is the formula for calculating your damage reduction from armor.

Armor DR = Armor / ( Armor + ( 50 * Monster Level ) )

For example, if you have 3,000 armor and the monster is level 60

3,000 / ( 3,000 + ( 50 * 60 ) )

3,000 / ( 3,000 + 3,000 )

3,000 / 6,000

.5 or 50% damage reduction


This means that with 3,000 armor and a monster that is level 60 you will take 50% of the incoming physical damage. Pretty neato.

You can find a chart and table for Armor Damage Reduction here.

Chart - http://i.imgur.com/alCHk.jpg
Table - http://i.imgur.com/76sHF.jpg

- Resistance -

Resistance is your major form of diverse magical damage reduction. Resistance is very useful for determining how much specific magical damage you can mitigate. Magical damage can come in the form of fire, lightning, frost ect... There is also Physical Resist. Plus ALL resists will add physical resists as well, however, having physical resists will not help to reduce fire damage, and having fire resists will not reduce frost damage so on and so forth. It is wise for you to focus more on +All resists while stacking a little bit of the others here and there for things that you might have issues with. If you're constantly dying to mortar, stacking a little bit higher Physical Resistance might help you a bit more since All Resists is budgeted a little bit higher.

You may also obtain resistance from Intelligence (Your main stat) at a rate of 10:1 Intelligence to Resists. Or in other words ( Intelligence * .1 ) Intelligence counts as All Resists.

Here is a quick formula for calculating yoru damage reduction from Resistances. (Please note that + All Resists counts as Physical Resistance as well)

Elemental DR = Resistance / ( Resistance + ( 5 × Monster Level ) )

For example, if you have 300 resists and the monster is level 60

300 / ( 300 + ( 5 * 60 ) )

300 / ( 300 + 300 )

300 / 600

.5 or 50% damage reduction.


This means that with 300 resists and a monster level of 60 you will take 50% less magical damage.

You can find a chart and table for Resist Damage Reduction here.

Chart - http://i.imgur.com/7uV2B.jpg
Table - http://i.imgur.com/sX8Nv.jpg

- Dodge -

Dodge is not a very mitigational stat. While it's nice to dodge something every once and a while, dodge isn't very useful to a Wizard for avoiding damage.

Dodge is a very RNG stat (Random number generator)

Imagine this, if you have 20% dodge, you now have a 1 in 5 chance of avoiding an attack. This means the computer will roll between 1 and 100. If the computer happens to roll a number between 1 and 20, you will now completely dodge the attack.

While having a little bit of dexterity here and there doesn't hurt, I wouldn't count on using this as a mitigational stat as it isn't a consistent form of mitigation.

- How do I calculate how much damage I will take? -

So you might ask, how do I mitigate a melee swing with BOTH armor AND physical resist? Well, the answer is it's multiplicative.

Let's say you have 4,500 armor and 450 phyisical resist. The level 60 monster swings for 20,000 damage. How much damage will I actually take?

First, let's figure out our percentiles for damage reduction from Armor and Resists

Armor - 4,500 / ( 4,500 + ( 50 * 60 ) = .6 or 60% damage reduction.

Resists - 450 / ( 450 + ( 5 * 60 ) = .6 or 60% damage reduction


Ok, now I have 60% damage reduction from Armor and 60% damage reduction from my physical resists. What do I do now?

Well, find the difference in percentage for each value.

1 - .6 = .4 or 100% - 60% = 40%

Now I take both values and multiply them.

,4 * .4 = .16 or 40% * 40% = 16%

This means I will now only take 16% of the damage or 3,200 of 20,000. Wow, that's a pretty huge difference.

Now what if I had Blur on? Blur is a straight 20% reduction in damage.

The remainder of 20% is 80% or .8

.4 * .4 * .8 = .128 or 12.8%

This means with Blur I will now take 12.8% of the damage or 2,560 of 20,000.

You can find a chart that demonstrates this here.

Chart - http://i.imgur.com/60wYi.jpg

- So what does this have to do with effective health? -

Well, let's say for example your multiplicative reduction value is .5 or 50%. Let's also say I have a health pool of 20,000.

With 50% reduction in damage my 20,000 health pool is now as effective as a 40,000 health pool. This means I can take 100% more damage or in other words my health is 200% more effective than it would be if I was naked with the same size pool.

One other important thing to note is Life on Hit and Life Regeneration. At 50% damage reduction my Life on Hit and Life Regeneration is now 200% more effective as well.

Well, how do you figure?

Before I would have needed a 40,000 health pool versus a 20,000 health pool. Let's say all along I had a total life regeneration of 500 health per second.

It would take approximately 80 seconds to fill a health pool of 40,000 (40,000 / 500 = 80)

Now it would take approximately 40 seconds to fill a health pool of 20,000 (20,000 / 500 = 80)

Since my health pool is now 200% more effective since I take 50% less damage, I can now regenerate my health twice as effectively.

- Conclusion -

Resists and armor are very important factors in determining your effective health pool. While having a massive health pool may sound awesome, you're really not doing anything for yourself by having one that is so large and ignoring your armor / resists.

Raising your effective health is going to benefit you more in the long run. I can't tell you how much vitality = how much armor = how much resists, but hopefully now you might have a better understanding of how armor and resists play a vital role in your effective health.

Long story short.

10 Armor ~ 10 Strength ~ 10 Intelligence ~ 1 Resists when it comes to damage mitigation. Those values will decrease if you favor one over the other.

Basically having 1,000 Armor and 500 Resists = 5,000 Armor and 100 resists.

A 10:1 ratio of Armor to Resists.

If you would like to see how stats affect your Effective Health feel free to try this calculator on for size. (Thanks to Xavor for linking it!)

http://rubensayshi.github.com/d3-ehp-calculator/#intro

Here is also a link to the spreadsheet used to create these graphs.

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B7tAwGDT2NWqaGpaY3ZMUXFmOXc

If you would like to see an example of just how high these numbers can actually go please visit this thread.

http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/5745445560?page=1#1

TL:DR Raise your Resists and Armor.


TL:DR Raise your Resists and Armor.


or just lrn2dodge

good post though for any wiz looking to go down the resist path, there are a lot of em asking for tips on the forums
Dodge is too RNG to consider useful =P

It's nice to dodge an attack every once and a while but counting on dodge to save you is like counting on rolling snake eyes in craps.

While it can happen, it's not all that likely.
Ehhhh... More math
Just learn the 5 D's of dogeball
06/07/2012 08:12 AMPosted by Lacrymosa
Just learn the 5 D's of dogeball

What, do you guys think you're monks?
Dodge is too RNG to consider useful =P

It's nice to dodge an attack every once and a while but counting on dodge to save you is like counting on rolling snake eyes in craps.

While it can happen, it's not all that likely.
He's talking about actually moving away from projectiles and out of the fire. Or kiting melees.

Of course saying dodge doesn't mitigate incoming damage is outright lying, its just doesn't mitigate the damage *consistently*.

Also: Armor affects all damage (including magical). Resists (all resists in particular) affect all damage types. There is in fact a physical resistance. Of course your math assumes that after specifically saying the armor/resist values apply to physical/magical damage respectively. Because if they did apply to the damage separately (no overlap) having more of both would not increase your effective health multiplicativeley. Rather it would increse it primarily linearly.
Dodge as a stat =/= physically moving away. =P

I don't think I worded myself clearly, let me rewrite a few sections.
http://rubensayshi.github.com/d3-ehp-calculator/#intro

Not mine, but I use it.
http://rubensayshi.github.com/d3-ehp-calculator/#intro

Not mine, but I use it.

That's actually quite useful.
There are some good web calculators floating around that streamline all the math. Vit isn't as important for mages running Force Armor and works against any regen (hp/s, hp/hit, ect). Very nice for mages not aware of this information. Currently running 17khp 15kdps in act 3 and can take some hits while I hope to get even better gear ^_^
http://us.battle.net/d3/en/forum/topic/5621027826
Force Armor is really only useful if you can't afford the money on resist gear.

Also, you have to remember that with Force Armor you have to put your effective health in the "sweet spot" in order to get any real gain from it.

Here's a quick and dirty graph that demonstrates how Force Armor works.

http://i.imgur.com/JTSRy.jpg

It's really only useful if you're taking damage in the 36% to 135% damage range. Even less useful if you're on the lower range of the spec.

Personally I would rather take up Magic Weapon / Force Weapon in place of an armor spell. That's my eventual goal with upping my armor / resists.

Inferno's ready to be nerfed shortly. I currently have no need for an armor spell in Act I Inferno. In fact, it's causing my Illusionist to not proc as often. A real problem indeed as Teleport / Illusionist is our only real means of escape.
http://rubensayshi.github.com/d3-ehp-calculator/#intro

Not mine, but I use it.


Very useful. Thanks for posting it here.
Updated.

If there are any other corrections that need to be made please do not hesitate to let me know.
I read your above post concerning Force Armor, but I'm still a bit confused. The way Force Armor currently works, it scales positively with your health total, and the more health you have, the more FA can do to protect you (please correct me if I am wrong in my understanding).

I don't know the math behind it, but it seems to me that using FA raises the effective weight of Vitality and +Life% compared to other mitigation. Again, I don't have the faintest idea how this works out mathematically, but it's something to consider.
I have a question that I have been wondering since I began playing. How do you determine the level of the monsters? Is it explained somewhere in the gameguide that I have not yet explored?
Try doing inferno ponies without force armor..and good luck.

With 67% reduction from armor and 32k hp I am able to take a hit with force armor in inferno Whimsyshire (which allows for quick instant teleport w/ illusionist). No way in hell would that be possible without force armor..Not just the no one shot mechanic but the extra armor is invaluable..

Guess it sorta depends on where you are in the game and whether or not you want to allow for 1-2 hits to escape and regen.
We all have the numbers for level 60 mobs, but does anyone have the numbers for the mobs in particular that are in Act 3 and above? I would like to know what level those monsters are and what my mitigation is in comparison, to better calculate my build. Its too bad, I think the comparisons should show charts of monsters above 60 as well when you move your mouse under armor or resistances, especially since you're not fighting level 60 monsters in Inferno.
Imagine this, if you have 20% dodge, you now have a 1 in 5 chance of avoiding an attack. This means the computer will roll between 1 and 100. If the computer happens to roll a number between 1 and 20, you will now completely dodge the attack.

While having a little bit of dexterity here and there doesn't hurt, I wouldn't count on using this as a mitigational stat as it isn't a consistent form of mitigation.


It is only true when hits can one shot you.

Reliably mitigate 20% of every hit=randomly avoid 1hit out of 5
For instance if you have 30k HP and the incoming damage is 38K then your case is true.
With armor's mitigation you live, with dodge's randomness you die.

So when say dexteriy and armor becomes a trade-off on armor, there is really no simply answer which is more important, it depends on the current stats of the character.
As a rule of thumb, if you have poor armor and low HP and you get 1 or 1/3 shot (with Force armor) then you need armor and vit
If you have decent armor and HP and force armor is rarely triggered, then dexterity is just as good as armor.

In probability, when your number of samples are large enough, the average of any random generated process will equal the probability.
2 tips from a 70+k dps mage:

Just dodge crap. Don't use diamond skin, it breeds bad habits (IE: allowing yourself to get hit).

Damage matters, everything else is just icing. I only have 30k hp, and 450resists, but it's enough to spare me a few hits. Still, I don't get hit, that's why I can farm everything without dying, and killing stuff faster helps you not get hit.

This should go without saying though: soul lashers and other such things may never be conquerable without being lucky

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