One question for ur dev team

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01/18/2013 07:12 PMPosted by vexorian


You are of course, referring to D3 at launch? :p

edit: i r gud wit engrish
Launch was 8 months ago. Get over it.

For that matter, if TL2 or PoE would ever have as many users in their servers as back when D3 was released, their puny servers would melt.


Most people still don't understand this.
Launch was 8 months ago. Get over it.

For that matter, if TL2 or PoE would ever have as many users in their servers as back when D3 was released, their puny servers would melt.


Most people still don't understand this.


Didn't D3's servers melt at launch?
Vaeflare
Community Manager
One statement I’ve seen over and over on these forums and elsewhere are proposals for “easy” fixes and overarching assumptions about how long implementation for a variety of changes “should” take.

The reality is, game development is a hugely iterative and time-consuming process, with many people involved along the way. Design takes time, Coding takes time, art takes time, QA takes time: you name it. There are also multiple steps in the pipeline for each and every proposed change and bug fix, no matter how minor, and what issues are being worked on in what order and by who can and do change as new matters arise. Sometimes extra testing is also needed for bugs that come back broken and need to be retested, because we didn't want them to go live with a bad fix.

While there may indeed be a list of known issues and bugs that run alongside some patches, for every one you are aware of, there can be dozens or hundreds being worked on behind-the-scenes that you likely never be aware of. We do things just as quickly as we can, but even then, it’s a process that takes time.


Why was the engine so complex?... why not make it more modular like the Diablos' of old... isn't that Blizzards thing now... Modularity... There was no reason to make the game so scripted and ditch all of the lessons of the past about open world, go anywhere, do anything (save for completed quests)... I mean it seems fairly simple to me. I work on sculptures and they take me sometimes a year to complete... so I get it... but this is a CPU, where things can be deleted, pasted, copied, added and subtracted in the blink of an eye. Why are the darn textures on legendaries being changed... just remove the colors and add X color in. I mean I'm no rocket surgeon, but I've done quite a bit of Photoshop and some 3D studio max in my day... how is this so laborious?
One statement I’ve seen over and over on these forums and elsewhere are proposals for “easy” fixes and overarching assumptions about how long implementation for a variety of changes “should” take.

The reality is, game development is a hugely iterative and time-consuming process, with many people involved along the way. Design takes time, Coding takes time, art takes time, QA takes time: you name it. There are also multiple steps in the pipeline for each and every proposed change and bug fix, no matter how minor, and what issues are being worked on in what order and by who can and do change as new matters arise. Sometimes extra testing is also needed for bugs that come back broken and need to be retested, because we didn't want them to go live with a bad fix.

While there may indeed be a list of known issues and bugs that run alongside some patches, for every one you are aware of, there can be dozens or hundreds being worked on behind-the-scenes that you likely never be aware of. We do things just as quickly as we can, but even then, it’s a process that takes time.


you had many years prior. 7 months after release still no PVP as promised. Restrictions, you took the fun out of diablo and the glory of finding epic loot so you can profit from the rmah, the good drops are only gonna drop if it benefits ah. Some people play 500 hours with high mf and never get an epic weapon or armor. We kind of feel like you slapped us in the face, giving us this because it will sell because of the Diablo name. But like others have said, the combat action is top notch, probably the best ever. But there's not much substance. Everybody does thousands of alk runs over and over and that's it! That's not cool man.
01/18/2013 06:13 PMPosted by Xort
The reality is, game development is a hugely iterative and time-consuming process, with many people involved along the way. Design takes time, Coding takes time, art takes time, QA takes time: you name it.


So the many years of development before release wasn't enough...?


Do you know that Window 95 still has problems with it's programming? Windows 95! Released almost 20 years ago from the biggest OS software company ever!
One statement I’ve seen over and over on these forums and elsewhere are proposals for “easy” fixes and overarching assumptions about how long implementation for a variety of changes “should” take.

The reality is, game development is a hugely iterative and time-consuming process, with many people involved along the way. Design takes time, Coding takes time, art takes time, QA takes time: you name it. There are also multiple steps in the pipeline for each and every proposed change and bug fix, no matter how minor, and what issues are being worked on in what order and by who can and do change as new matters arise. Sometimes extra testing is also needed for bugs that come back broken and need to be retested, because we didn't want them to go live with a bad fix.

While there may indeed be a list of known issues and bugs that run alongside some patches, for every one you are aware of, there can be dozens or hundreds being worked on behind-the-scenes that you likely never be aware of. We do things just as quickly as we can, but even then, it’s a process that takes time.


So you simply dodge the part where smaller companies, that charge less (or sometimes nothing), with smaller dev teams - push updates daily or weekly?; Whereas you guys take MONTHS even for a small patch with 3 lines in the patchnotes...

Unacceptable.
omg i wish you wow kids would just leave!!!!
01/18/2013 10:10 PMPosted by TheOneRaven
Why was the engine so complex?... why not make it more modular like the Diablos' of old... isn't that Blizzards thing now... Modularity... There was no reason to make the game so scripted and ditch all of the lessons of the past about open world, go anywhere, do anything (save for completed quests)... I mean it seems fairly simple to me. I work on sculptures and they take me sometimes a year to complete... so I get it... but this is a CPU, where things can be deleted, pasted, copied, added and subtracted in the blink of an eye. Why are the darn textures on legendaries being changed... just remove the colors and add X color in. I mean I'm no rocket surgeon, but I've done quite a bit of Photoshop and some 3D studio max in my day... how is this so laborious?

Please take a course on software development and try and post that... Diablo II's game code was total garbage and people who have reverse engineered parts of it will agree with that.

For example, smite rolls an attack on defense ratting block but fails to use the result. Mana burn forgets a 8 bit right shift. The client code for Charge is different from the server code causing it to desynchronize client views. The list goes on and on and on...

01/18/2013 10:24 PMPosted by MortosDS
So you simply dodge the part where smaller companies, that charge less (or sometimes nothing), with smaller dev teams - push updates daily or weekly?; Whereas you guys take MONTHS even for a small patch with 3 lines in the patchnotes...

Where as their patches affect 1/20 of the number of people or less and often contain more bugs in them than they fix.

We all know of the fail in Guild Wars where the developers forgot to set an items price correctly allowing people to create infinite wealth on demand. The developers's approach was to ban / rollback all ill gotten gains and not appologise for their big mistake. Blizzard's approach would be to let people keep that wealth (potentially ruining a game like Diablo II was with duping) and appologise for their huge mistake. As such Blizzard needs to make less serious mistakes as the damage cannot be fixed by blaming the players.
7 years of time isnt sufficient dear Vaeflare?

Yeah, you have your answer.
01/18/2013 06:32 PMPosted by zobudeny
Name one.

POE, Torchlight 2 and also Diablo 2 had much faster development for his age.


PoE, TL2 ..... The quality of those game are low =.="
One statement I’ve seen over and over on these forums and elsewhere are proposals for “easy” fixes and overarching assumptions about how long implementation for a variety of changes “should” take. The reality is, game development is a hugely iterative and time-consuming process, with many people involved along the way. Design takes time, Coding takes time, art takes time, QA takes time: you name it. There are also multiple steps in the pipeline for each and every proposed change and bug fix, no matter how minor, and what issues are being worked on in what order and by who can and do change as new matters arise. Sometimes extra testing is also needed for bugs that come back broken and need to be retested, because we didn't want them to go live with a bad fix.While there may indeed be a list of known issues and bugs that run alongside some patches, for every one you are aware of, there can be dozens or hundreds being worked on behind-the-scenes that you likely never be aware of. We do things just as quickly as we can, but even then, it’s a process that takes time.


I think what you are overlooking here is that it DOES take the team way to long to update things. Blizzard/Activision is likely a billion dollar company that should hire some more people to crank out ALOT more implementations. Why be that greedy and not have the man power that they should on a project of this scope?

Also as others have already mentioned, the team has had SEVEN years or more possibly to have things in order by now. How can their possibly be so many things still missing from this game in the first place?

I normally have more constructive posts but I find this outrageous that you took the time to respond to this post and counter yourself in your own argument here by explaining all the steps things go through and that the current process for updates is completly bogus.

Most people say things are "easy fixes" because of much smaller companys implementing things at greater speeds and quite frankly better updates. (see PoE)

The PTR servers for example should be constantly up and running coming changes, instead they sat idle for how many months?
One statement I’ve seen over and over on these forums and elsewhere are proposals for “easy” fixes and overarching assumptions about how long implementation for a variety of changes “should” take.

The reality is, game development is a hugely iterative and time-consuming process, with many people involved along the way. Design takes time, Coding takes time, art takes time, QA takes time: you name it. There are also multiple steps in the pipeline for each and every proposed change and bug fix, no matter how minor, and what issues are being worked on in what order and by who can and do change as new matters arise. Sometimes extra testing is also needed for bugs that come back broken and need to be retested, because we didn't want them to go live with a bad fix.

While there may indeed be a list of known issues and bugs that run alongside some patches, for every one you are aware of, there can be dozens or hundreds being worked on behind-the-scenes that you likely never be aware of. We do things just as quickly as we can, but even then, it’s a process that takes time.


People did not study for programming will always think an update can be done within one-two days ... Speaking is always easier than doing.

PS: I think someone will pretend that he/she is a professional programmer to counter-attack my statement.
One statement I’ve seen over and over on these forums and elsewhere are proposals for “easy” fixes and overarching assumptions about how long implementation for a variety of changes “should” take.


The thing is, most of the easy fixes proposed on these forums are just numbers tweaks, you roll on into the database, change 100% weapon damage to 150% and your done, the tooltip would even update automatically since this isn't Warcraft 3 world editor.

SOOOOOOOO many of the skills and runes could have been easily tweaked to become usable with little to no effort, instead they are left to rot for 8 months and there are not more than a few viable builds for each class, a bit different from the limitless builds advertised.

Not being able to do simple tweaks like these in months, when there aren't even PvP concerns to balance around is just pathetic when you compare yourselves to say Riot who push a patch every 3 weeks which is much harder to balance being a 100% PvP Game
One statement I’ve seen over and over on these forums and elsewhere are proposals for “easy” fixes and overarching assumptions about how long implementation for a variety of changes “should” take.

The reality is, game development is a hugely iterative and time-consuming process, with many people involved along the way. Design takes time, Coding takes time, art takes time, QA takes time: you name it. There are also multiple steps in the pipeline for each and every proposed change and bug fix, no matter how minor, and what issues are being worked on in what order and by who can and do change as new matters arise. Sometimes extra testing is also needed for bugs that come back broken and need to be retested, because we didn't want them to go live with a bad fix.

While there may indeed be a list of known issues and bugs that run alongside some patches, for every one you are aware of, there can be dozens or hundreds being worked on behind-the-scenes that you likely never be aware of. We do things just as quickly as we can, but even then, it’s a process that takes time.

I understand and appreciate this process.

My fair question is how a bug that's "been addressed" patch after patch after patch still makes it through unscathed. Dashing strike will rubberband you under pathable surface when no other spot around your targetted area avoids collision. Generally this happens when there are alot of mobs on the screen or you are in a cramped area with a few mobs around you.

I've reproduced this very bug, recorded it, uploaded it and reported it. It's also been reproduced patch after patch. The bug essentially makes your character disappear, be unable to use any skills on your bar, the server does not register a killing blow on your character, regen still works, potions still work, portal does not. The only way to get rid of the problem is to spend the 10 seconds logging out while the monsters are whaling away on a bugged character lol.
8 months of D3 and game doesnt seem any better.
best thing D3 team can do now is scrap the game and remake it otherwise no1 will buy the expansion, and im sure they know there will be no money made on the expansion because everyone is done with this game.

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