AoS: New HotS Cinematic Feat. EG.iNcontroL

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What you had basically said was that the Hyperion was being run by 40 people which I don't think it was. When Raynor initially defected he only took 400 people with him as well. Aboard the Hyperion which is a Behemoth class. The Bucephalus is a Minotaur class. Though as far as I can tell there's no difference in the sizes between classes, just their armaments and efficiency. Every BC seems to not be the exact same length, just very similar though. Just like real-life ships. The Bucephalus apparently sports 8000 people.

I dunno, maybe the Hyperion is Adjutant run? (It makes sense, actually).
That or Horner is a really good captain.
didn't have the adjutant til partway through the campaign I thought.
01/28/2013 01:34 PMPosted by Ponera
didn't have the adjutant til partway through the campaign I thought.
It has one of it's own. Don't you recall Raynor asking the adjutant about mission details? Hell, it's in the first mission too. You can go play it to prove me right :)

01/28/2013 01:23 PMPosted by Ponera
nah I don't think ultras are active hunters at all, I never said that I was just letting you know how things scale up naturally, rather than artificially which is what zerg do
Well, isn't that implying that an Ultralisk should be scaled as a Predator even though it isn't? The Brontolith was a docile animal and the Zerg don't eat other things, just surviving off creep. I don't consider them predators anymore than dolphins. Dolphins with spikes :3

Thinking about it though. It sounds stupid to say that Zerg aren't predators. I mean, they're not really hunters, but they do hunting-like things, but they're told to do those things. There's a lot more thought to this but I really can't decide if it's technically accurate to call them predators or not.
dolphins are devastating predators, cunning, fast and able to kill a large amount of prey in short amounts of time. I wasn't implying anything.
01/28/2013 01:38 PMPosted by Ponera
dolphins are devastating predators, cunning, fast and able to kill a large amount of prey in short amounts of time. I wasn't implying anything.


They are also the second most intelligent species on the planet. Just ahead of humans who are third.
01/28/2013 01:38 PMPosted by Ponera
dolphins are devastating predators, cunning, fast and able to kill a large amount of prey in short amounts of time. I wasn't implying anything.
Then I don't know why you said that about Predators :x
Well, it doesn't matter. Quit being a failure and let me join you guys some time! >:/
01/28/2013 01:44 PMPosted by Razgriz
Quit being a failure
Never.
01/28/2013 01:46 PMPosted by zappy
Quit being a failure
Never.
Yeah, I've had a bone to pick with you for awhile.
01/28/2013 01:33 PMPosted by Razgriz
What you had basically said was that the Hyperion was being run by 40 people which I don't think it was.


While the Raiders only numbered 40 people, who's to say they didn't hire on regular people for other parts of the crew (kitchens, maintenance, etc)? Or people looking for transport from planet to planet who work to pay for their transit?
01/28/2013 01:50 PMPosted by Razgriz
Never.
Yeah, I've had a bone to pick with you for awhile.
What might that be?
01/28/2013 01:44 PMPosted by Reno
dolphins are devastating predators, cunning, fast and able to kill a large amount of prey in short amounts of time. I wasn't implying anything.


They are also the second most intelligent species on the planet. Just ahead of humans who are third.


As far as encephalization quotient, the ranking goes Humans, Elephant nose fish and then I think some cetaceans are in the mix. As far as pure intelligence, it's hard to say- cephalopods rank up there, cetaceans, crovids, psittacids, other primates....lots of option, really. Hard to say when our tests are biased enough based on intelligence and geographic location, nevermind being able to communicate adequately. Though there is a resurgence in the concept of a translator between dolphins and people; someone is working on it now, but their syntax and grammar (if they even have it) is going to be incredibly hard to resolve. Still, a useful experience for if we ever encounter intelligent life off world as that would almost certainly be a messy bit of business to communicate.
01/28/2013 01:53 PMPosted by DirtyD
What you had basically said was that the Hyperion was being run by 40 people which I don't think it was.


While the Raiders only numbered 40 people, who's to say they didn't hire on regular people for other parts of the crew (kitchens, maintenance, etc)? Or people looking for transport from planet to planet who work to pay for their transit?
That's what I'm thinking.

01/28/2013 02:00 PMPosted by zappy
What might that be?
Let's not spoil the mystery.

Also, I have an epic case of the tired. So I'll be off. Later.
01/28/2013 02:07 PMPosted by Razgriz
Let's not spoil the mystery.
Well, i would prefer to not annoy people, given the option, so if i'm doing something wrong, please let me know.
01/28/2013 02:17 PMPosted by zappy
Let's not spoil the mystery.
Well, i would prefer to not annoy people, given the option, so if i'm doing something wrong, please let me know.


it's called mechanics of starcraft that is wrong
01/28/2013 02:07 PMPosted by Razgriz


While the Raiders only numbered 40 people, who's to say they didn't hire on regular people for other parts of the crew (kitchens, maintenance, etc)? Or people looking for transport from planet to planet who work to pay for their transit?
That's what I'm thinking.

01/28/2013 02:00 PMPosted by zappy
What might that be?
Let's not spoil the mystery.

Also, I have an epic case of the tired. So I'll be off. Later.


Epic case of the tired? There's a saying called "sleep is for the weak".
01/28/2013 02:07 PMPosted by Ponera
Still, a useful experience for if we ever encounter intelligent life off world as that would almost certainly be a messy bit of business to communicate.


Don't Panic

Also, you mentioned a dinosaur that has vertabrae the size of compact cars? Never heard that before. I always thought the blue whale was the largest animal to ever live, but is that dinosaur bigger?


Yeah Argentinosaurus is frickin MASSIVE, not as big as the biggest whales, but apparently Shonisaurs are hypthesized to get pretty damn big too.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_u6CUqDWU5nw/TUiY85SuXFI/AAAAAAAAAzs/ILXofIqnryM/s1600/Argentinosaurus+1.jpg (I might have had the scale a bit wrong, as I said I've never worked with Sauropods before. I think the 100 ton estimate is not far off though)

http://pablam.files.wordpress.com/2012/09/dsc06220-1.jpg

here is a pretty average sized vertebrae from this dinosaurs, as far as I know. The LENGTH is comparable to a beetle somewhat, but the mass sure isn't.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_9py6IgNlFak/TKVM3NBYtUI/AAAAAAAAApc/IWF9nqVAuJk/s1600/Shonisaurus.png

and finally:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-QAKhvslNErU/UFdH653WTlI/AAAAAAAAM9s/LXsH5Yw-BF4/s1600/predator-x-size-comparison.jpg

Predators don't typically get as large as herbivores, when talking about max sizes. Typically the largest are filter feeds in the ocean, which are technically planktonivores


Now that's a thunder lizard.

That's got to be on the cusp of largest possible land creature, right? There's got to a point where something is just too damn big to live. Of course size wasn't a liability until a very specific asteroid impact.

Does it ever bother you that your entire field of study is based on creatures that lived and died millions upon millions of years before even the most primitive primates even existed? No matter what you discover, you will never see a living specimen in your specialty. Everything is just for the sake of seeing how things long gone went about their business before they fizzled out.

Although I suppose anyone who studies history is the same way. Not sure most historians would relish meeting Ghengis Khan.
It depends on gravity and oxygen levels, as far as many things are concened.

That's actiually not true. I have held live nautilus, I have a senegal bichir not 1 foot from me right now. I've seen lots of throwbacks. Honestly I'm also a comparative anatomist so I'm more than happy with everything.
Are modern nautilus so similiar to their ancient ancestors that you consider them one in the same?

I honestly don't know. I know there are some live creatures on the sea floor that resemble ancient fossils. I guess things don't change much down there.
01/28/2013 10:27 PMPosted by Marjoly
Are modern nautilus so similiar to their ancient ancestors that you consider them one in the same?


I consider them an amazing proxy, sure they aren't the perfect ammonite but I have seen so many ammonite shells that seeing their closest relative, that has a similar shell, is satisfying.

I honestly don't know. I know there are some live creatures on the sea floor that resemble ancient fossils. I guess things don't change much down there.


Or you just don't know much about life on this planet. Monotremes, for example, are so retardedly plesiomorphic that many modern zoologists are doing it wrong; they aren't crown group mammalia. Or another? Onychophora, sister group and our best intermediate between annelida and arthropoda. Hoatzin? Bird with claws on its forelimb, in juvenile state.

I see a horse and I understand what it is...I also know it's history, how the earliest known horse was mistaken for a !@#$in hyrax (which is a relative of elephants, believe it or not, and alive today) so bad that it was named Hyracotherium? HYRAX BEAST?

6 gill shark, frilled shark, Horsehoe crabs, Ambylopygids, pipe snakes, shield tail snakes, Tuatara, Kiwi, Seriema....

Oh god if you only knew. If you only knew.

I feel like I'm beating a not yet dead horse here. Our biosphere is amazing

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