Instead of raging, I’m going to write this

General Discussion
The scholar C.S. Lewis once wrote about a certain problem that everyone in the world suffered from. Regarding it, he said:
“There is no fault which makes a man more unpopular, and no fault which we are more unconscious of in ourselves. And the more we have it ourselves, the more we dislike it in others. The vice I am talking of is Pride or Self-Conceit.” *

My opponent’s first words to me during my last game were “you can leave now. You’re not worth my time.” He then started typing a series of insults and profanities which continued until I blocked him- and probably long after. Unfortunately, his rude behavior was not limited to just words. During the final battle of our game, he started pausing and unpausing the game, messing up my micro. I wish this story had a happy ending and I could say “but I won anyway”, but it doesn’t. I lost.

I’ve played nearly 8,000 games, and I don’t get the “ladder anxiety” that bothers a lot of people. But one thing does make me anxious in starcraft: playing against a rude guy. I get nervous and start to play badly when my opponent insults me. It’s a real irony –the times when I most badly want to win are the times that I’m most likely to lose. But oh well. The rude guy probably wasn’t going to change his behavior as a result of me beating him, however good that would have felt. That brings me to my main point here.

Everyone on this forum can agree that stuck up jerks are, well, stuck up jerks. We can all agree that we don’t like them, and that such people ruin the experience of playing StarCraft –or any game. What’s more difficult is to admit that there have been times when you or I have been those jerks. Raging at a cheeser might not be as bad as pausing and unpausing to screw up someone’s micro, but they’re both symptoms of the self-conceit described by Lewis. The same pride which looks so disgusting from the outside will give you no warning as it creeps up on the inside. So the next time you lose to someone who’s drowning in his own self-conceit, remember this: you can’t control the other person’s behavior, but you have some say about your own. Don’t let yourself become like him.

* http://lib.ru/LEWISCL/mere_engl.txt
Should have told him that his IQ would have went up if he put a bullet in his brain.

No, I'm not kidding. Yes, I have told people that before.
lol, whoa blitz. C. S. Lewis was an absolutely brilliant writer and scholar.
02/01/2013 01:46 PMPosted by Doncroft
C. S. Lewis was an absolutely brilliant writer and scholar.


High five, buddy! ^^ I've read just about everything he's ever written, but my favorite is Mere Christianity.
02/01/2013 01:46 PMPosted by Doncroft
C. S. Lewis was an absolutely brilliant writer and scholar.
02/01/2013 01:48 PMPosted by Pegasus
C. S. Lewis was an absolutely brilliant writer and scholar.


High five, buddy! ^^ I've read just about everything he's ever written, but my favorite is Mere Christianity.


Narnia FTW!
02/01/2013 01:46 PMPosted by Doncroft
lol, whoa blitz. C. S. Lewis was an absolutely brilliant writer and scholar.


Woops, I was referring to the idiot Pegasus was talking about, not Lewis.

I have no problems with C.S. Lewis.
02/01/2013 02:01 PMPosted by blitz
lol, whoa blitz. C. S. Lewis was an absolutely brilliant writer and scholar.


Woops, I was referring to the idiot Pegasus was talking about, not Lewis.

I have no problems with C.S. Lewis.


You were clear the first time around. Telling people to shoot themselves is generally a bad idea, even if they are total idiots. ^^;
It's very satisfying when you beat people like this, but unfortunately it doesn't happen all the time. Either way, the ignore function is very useful in putting a quick end to such undesirable encounters so I don't have to lower myself to their level and waste energy dealing with them any longer.
Learn to lol, bro. Odds are he is some pathetic twerp who needs to insult people online to cover his insecurities about his lack of a job/girlfriend.
if he got that into trying to bully you through a computer, odds are, he doesn't have much of a better platform in life to do the same to others on.

poor fellow.
02/01/2013 02:06 PMPosted by Pegasus
Telling people to shoot themselves is generally a bad idea, even if they are total idiots. ^^;


Don't let it repopulate! Kill it with fir-

*Ahem*

I mean,

02/01/2013 01:46 PMPosted by Doncroft
C. S. Lewis was an absolutely brilliant writer and scholar.
Just don't let him get upside your head. He's playing mind games with you and winning.
02/01/2013 02:21 PMPosted by Anesthetic
Raging at a cheeser might not be as bad as pausing and unpausing to screw up someone’s micro, but they’re both symptoms of the self-conceit described by Lewis.


But they actually are wasting time in a large majority of cases. A lot of us (most of us I think) play starcraft 2 in order to become a better gamer and develop our macro/micro skills among others. Losing to a 6 pool or something because it was in the last position you scouted is a literal defenition of wasting time for some of us. There is nothing gained from either side. Its simply a BO loss.

I dont think cheesing non-stop on ladder is justifiable for a lot of us.


I understand your point, but I don’t think cheesing on the ladder is always a waste of time. I think you need to consider this a little more closely. Your example with the 6 pool makes several key assumptions:

Assumption #1: If you didn’t scout the last position, you will lose to a 6 pool.

This isn’t true. I almost never lose to 6 pools in zvz anymore –and I almost never scout except with overlords. I just use safe builds that don’t auto-lose to 6 pools. I still lose to them sometimes, but that means their micro was better than mine. We still played a skill-based game, but it was a very short one.

#2: Beating or losing to a cheese is a waste of time.

If you never play against a 6 pool, how will you learn how to beat it? And from their perspective, if they never do it, how will they learn how to execute it perfectly? Now a 6 pool doesn’t take all that much practice execute perfectly, but something like say, proxy 2 rax, can be made or broken by good micro.

#3: The person who cheesed you is doing it constantly.

How do you know this? Most of the time, you only play a person once. Unless they specifically tell you they’re always cheesing, I see no reason to assume it’s so. Personally, I mix in a cheese every now and then, and I imagine other players do too.
02/01/2013 01:51 PMPosted by VIPER
Narnia FTW!
I understand your point, but I don’t think cheesing on the ladder is always a waste of time. I think you need to consider this a little more closely. Your example with the 6 pool makes several key assumptions:Assumption #1: If you didn’t scout the last position, you will lose to a 6 pool.This isn’t true. I almost never lose to 6 pools in zvz anymore –and I almost never scout except with overlords. I just use safe builds that don’t auto-lose to 6 pools. I still lose to them sometimes, but that means their micro was better than mine. We still played a skill-based game, but it was a very short one.#2: Beating or losing to a cheese is a waste of time.If you never play against a 6 pool, how will you learn how to beat it? And from their perspective, if they never do it, how will they learn how to execute it perfectly? Now a 6 pool doesn’t take all that much practice execute perfectly, but something like say, proxy 2 rax, can be made or broken by good micro. #3: The person who cheesed you is doing it constantly.How do you know this? Most of the time, you only play a person once. Unless they specifically tell you they’re always cheesing, I see no reason to assume it’s so. Personally, I mix in a cheese every now and then, and I imagine other players do too.


I couldn't agree more with any of this. +1 :D
02/01/2013 01:46 PMPosted by Doncroft
lol, whoa blitz. C. S. Lewis was an absolutely brilliant writer and scholar.


His fiction works were good.

His apologist works were pretty much standard apologist; replete with the whole list of logical fallacies, inconsistencies and illogical statements required to support apologism.
I actually think players like this provide you with a golden opportunity. I know how it feels to lose to a rude person, and you DO want to beat them. I find when winning becomes the goal to an individual game I tend to rush it, try to get ahead because I feel stressed by close games and just want to win. As a result I play badly, I get nervous before encounters, and I tend to fall apart during the game that I desperately wanted to win! So what's the golden opportunity I mentioned?

Training your emotional response to players like these. You all probably watch Day9, he talks a lot about emotions and how to train in starcraft II. In one daily he talked about learned to dodge ninja stars (or negative emotions). Each time we lose a game and feel like crap (we all do at some point, that's okay) it's an opportunity to think about how NOT to feel that way next time, and train your emotional response.

Sometimes I sit down at the computer and make my priority: don't get emotional about winning or losing.

I recently came across this quote

"The discipline of emotions is the training of responses."

I love that. I don't have to be subject to the whims of my feelings, because I can train and practice my responses!

I know this was kind of long and meaty, but for me personally, it's a big issue I am trying to overcome.

Enjoy the game and improve yourself! Regardless of winning or losing:-)

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