Female Characters in WoW Part 2

Story Forum
Prev 1 3 4 5 9 Next
I've never understood the 'logic' behind the Bechdal test?

What is it testing/measuring? What is it's purpose? What does it show/prove?

It seems pointlessly arbitrary.


It was just a measure for pointing out if female characters in any work, be it movie or literary, get a single scene in which they could talk about something other than the male lead or the men surrounding them.

It's a singular test to find out if A) The female characters have lives of their own and B) If these female characters can make connections to each other outside the realm of men.
OH, I understood that. I just don't see how it actually measures that in any way, or has any particular relevance to the creation of well rounded female characters. Those criterion, A and B, do not equate to anything.
OH, I understood that. I just don't see how it actually measures that in any way, or has any particular relevance to the creation of well rounded female characters. Those criterion, A and B, do not equate to anything.


Well like I said it was neat and novel when the idea was first put forth. Both A+B are something a lot of female characters tend to lack.

But the test doesn't consider context or content at all outside of the parameters put forth. Hence, my shoe shopping comment.

The test is a good springboard, but it should not be the only criteria for the end product.
OH, I understood that. I just don't see how it actually measures that in any way, or has any particular relevance to the creation of well rounded female characters. Those criterion, A and B, do not equate to anything.


You should read the trope page.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TheBechdelTest?from=Main.BechdelsRule

The test is often misunderstood. The requirements are just what they say they are - it doesn't make any difference if, for instance, the male characters the women talk about are their fathers, sons, platonic friends or mortal enemies rather than romantic partners. Conversely, if a work seems to pass, it doesn't matter if male characters are present when the female characters talk, nor does it matter if the women only talk about stereotypically girly topics like shoe shopping - or even relationships, as long as it's not relationships with men.

This is because the Bechdel Test is not meant to give a scorecard of a work's overall level of feminism. It is entirely possible for a film to pass without having overt feminist themes - in fact, the original example of a movie that passes is Alien, which, while it has feminist subtexts, is mostly just a sci-fi/action/horror flick. A movie can easily pass the Bechdel Test and still be incredibly misogynistic. Conversely, it's also possible for a story to fail the test and still be strongly feminist in other ways, and there's nothing necessarily wrong with that. What's a problem is that it becomes a pattern - when so many movies fail the test, while very few show male characters whose lives revolve around women, that says uncomfortable things about the way Hollywood handles gender.
Women's brains are 10 percent smaller. Its science.


You say that like brain size actually means anything.
OH, I understood that. I just don't see how it actually measures that in any way, or has any particular relevance to the creation of well rounded female characters. Those criterion, A and B, do not equate to anything.


You should read the trope page.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TheBechdelTest?from=Main.BechdelsRule

The test is often misunderstood. The requirements are just what they say they are - it doesn't make any difference if, for instance, the male characters the women talk about are their fathers, sons, platonic friends or mortal enemies rather than romantic partners. Conversely, if a work seems to pass, it doesn't matter if male characters are present when the female characters talk, nor does it matter if the women only talk about stereotypically girly topics like shoe shopping - or even relationships, as long as it's not relationships with men.

This is because the Bechdel Test is not meant to give a scorecard of a work's overall level of feminism. It is entirely possible for a film to pass without having overt feminist themes - in fact, the original example of a movie that passes is Alien, which, while it has feminist subtexts, is mostly just a sci-fi/action/horror flick. A movie can easily pass the Bechdel Test and still be incredibly misogynistic. Conversely, it's also possible for a story to fail the test and still be strongly feminist in other ways, and there's nothing necessarily wrong with that. What's a problem is that it becomes a pattern - when so many movies fail the test, while very few show male characters whose lives revolve around women, that says uncomfortable things about the way Hollywood handles gender.
Women's brains are 10 percent smaller. Its science.


You say that like brain size actually means anything.


It was a movie reference. Lighten up.
first of all: i'd like to apologize for derailing the old thread. it's just really hard for me to stop arguing once i get started. i believe that one xkcd comic applies here: "someone is wrong on the internet! what do you want me to do, leave? then they'll keep being wrong!" but i'm going to make an effort to do just that.

on topic: i want to see tess greymane! and i want her to be a worgen. because worgen are awesome.
on topic: i want to see tess greymane! and i want her to be a worgen. because worgen are awesome.


I support this venture.
on topic: i want to see tess greymane! and i want her to be a worgen. because worgen are awesome.


I support this venture.


You say that like brain size actually means anything.


It does. Haven't you seen how smart blue whales are?


How many neanderthals do you see roaming the planet?

....

Did you know that they had just as large brains, if not larger brains than modern humans? O_o

Was that meant to be rhetorical? Because in the armpit of the western states where I live, the answer is "quite a few."


-_-

There's a race of humans, and there -was- a race of neanderthals. We had similar sized, if not smaller brains.
It was a movie referrence, nothing more.
There's a race of humans, and there -was- a race of neanderthals. We had similar sized, if not smaller brains.
I was being snarky. Sorry if it fell flat.


Eh. It could've gone either way. I chose to respond to it the way I did... ^_^

Although, snark aside, I could have sworn that there was some minor evidence to suggest that some modern humans are the descendants of hybrids?


Said so in WikiPedia.

on topic: i want to see tess greymane! and i want her to be a worgen. because worgen are awesome.


Agreed on seeing Tess Greymane again. She is the heir to the throne of Gilneas after all, so she needs to at least be present in the game after the Worgen starting area. I don't think it's important for her to be a Worgen, but it wouldn't hurt.
Regarding Aggra, real quick, I have a question. It's mentioned when you go to Nagrand in the dialogue there that one must put their heart and soul into it, blah blah blah, right? Wouldn't Thrall and Aggra becoming a couple be counter-intuitive to that, as it would divide Thrall's (and Aggra's) interests away from the whole Maelstrom deal?

Join the Conversation

Return to Forum