Night Elf RP Backstory

Story Forum
I came with a backstory I wanted to get a second opinion on before I started using it.

Among the long memories of the night elves, there exist many stories and legends. One such legend has been used to teach generations of Sentinels and priestesses about the many roles one can play in life, as well as the importance of united versus divided leadership.

Once, near the time when Burning Legion first attacked Azeroth, there were two Highborne sisters. These sisters were close, but had many differences. Yet, these opposites only served to bring them closer together, and it was a common sight in their home city to see the two going about their errands together and exchanging gossip with their friends and neighbors. To know one sister was to know both sisters, the townspeople claimed. Often it was said that it would take divine action to drive the sisters apart.

Then, disaster struck. The Burning Legion attacked. The two sisters, unlike many of their Highborne brethren, allied with the resistance and fought what quickly became a losing war. The sisters gained leadership positions in the resistance, but won very little battles because despite their relationship, they could not work together.

One sister, who before the war had studied as a Priestess of the Moon, said it was better to provide healing and blessings to the innocents and civilians of the war.

The other, who was once part of Queen Azshara's honor guard, was a skilled warrior who dabbled in sorcery, and said it was better to train and arm the warriors they had to fight the demonic armies head-on.

Their forces, divided between carrying out both plans, made little headway in either task. And, eventually, there was a great battle, of which only the sisters and a few others survived.

The sisters then made a pact. They would both separate, and go on journeys of enlightenment, each honing their chosen crafts. They journeyed to different parts of Azeroth, then still under on continent, and linked up with different kaldorei forces. They devoted their very existences to the war, doing everything they could to better themselves and thwart the Legion's advances.

The first sister became a legendary priestess and medic, and was a great boon to her allies. She could summon holy shields of power to protect her soldiers and grant them blessings as powerful as the goddess she worshiped. Her people loved her and showered her with praise and gifts wherever she went.

The second sister discovered she had a talent in necromancy and shadow magic. She trained her body to physical peak, furthering augmenting her strength and endurance by drawing energy from the dead and dying bodies around her. She fully developed her powers and became a fearsome sight on the battlefield even to the Legion dreadlords. For she could match their power with her own, and win. But, her allies feared her, for they knew she would use their souls as power should they fall. And though her army scored many victories against the Legion, she was shunned and loathed wherever she went.

Yet, when the sisters reunited for that final battle of the War of the Ancients, they had nothing but love and praise for each other. Both had proven themselves correct, and they went into combat with unmatched zeal. Many demons fell before their forces, and victory was certain.

But the two sisters were fighting on opposite banks of the Well of Eternity. When the Sundering happened, the sisters were separated by uncontrollable forces and found themselves on the opposite sides of the world. Their joy of being reunited was crushed within hours. Both were heartbroken, for they assumed the other dead.

The first sister became a hero among the night elves. Her nature, however, rebelled against the attention such a title brought her. So she returned to her temple and trained many priestesses in the ways of Elune the Moon Goddess. But she never stopped mourning, and when the Highborne were exiled and decided to attempt a crossing of the Maelstrom, she went with them hoping to find some sign or legacy of her fallen sister.

The second sister was cast out by her allies, and became a wandering warrior in what later became called the Eastern Kingdoms. Her addiction to magic, though, threatened to overcome her at times. Sadly, she fueled her addiction with further necromancy. When the urges became unbearable, she would go into a nearby village and consume the soul of a few unfortunate townsman. Human, dwarf, gnome, and even trolls and the newly arrived orcs sated her hunger for magic. Her immortality and restless spirit took her in every nook and cranny of the continent. The races of the Eastern Kingdom fear her, and to this day tell their legends of vampires to warn others about her. She, like her sister, never stopped morning, and this combined with her magic addiction turned her into a wretched shell of the elf she once was.

The legend typically ends with a heavy-handed lesson about the horrors of war and combat. But there is more to it.

Another version of the story says that the sisters eventually reunited, and live peaceful lives away from the events and troubles of the world. But it is also said that after the Third War, they became aware of their lack of immortality and now wish to pas on what they have learned over the millennia to worthy pupils. If any adventurer manages to track them down and impress them, then the sisters will train them in both martial and magical ways to turn the adventurer into a perfect fighter.
TL;DR This belongs in the World's End Tavern Forum. This forum is made for lore, world's end tavern is the rp forum of the forums.
10/03/2012 04:06 PMPosted by Vynathlon
TL;DR This belongs in the World's End Tavern Forum. This forum is made for lore, world's end tavern is the rp forum of the forums.


I know. I'll be more specific: is there anything in this that violates established lore?
No offense, but I didn't read. Lore nerds here debate lore to the letter. Roleplayers, at least some of them, are more forgiving of lore gaps and such. I think you may get a better response from the World's End Tavern.
My first nitpick is not in regard to lore, but it is entirely too wordy. You've got a lot of paragraphs in there that aren't really doing any work, and a lot of information that you don't need to have dragged out in a backstory.

A good backstory is a bird's eye view. It should describe briefly who this person is, what they do, and maybe go a little bit into explanatory detail. The rest should come out through RP or in other writing. Let people discover your character and enjoy the surprises, don't tell them everything, or even most of the details at the starting gate.

This is doubly so for MRP, TRP2 or Flag. You should have a short paragraph describing only things that you would expect a good amount of people to know. It shouldn't read like a biography.


As for lore and character consistency with it.

The biggest thing that I tell people is that you shouldn't create a character that matters in terms of the overall story. I borrow the accounting term of "materiality" to develop a paradigm for this.

The general idea is this: we rely on Blizzard to convey the facts on significant issues. They create the sandbox, they define the world in which we are playing, and therefore have the sole right to create material facts. If we allowed players to create material facts, we would have unmanageable chaos, and would create significant barriers to RP. (Why does it create barriers? Because you're demanding that everyone else interpret and accept your edits to established lore before they RP with you.)

RPers get to play with immaterial facts. It doesn't matter what my washed-up warden is up to. She's not about to turn the tide of any battles, create an international incident, or be the only one to learn how to juggle luckydos and drive steam tanks at the same time. If she did, such would be noteworthy, it would change the sandbox, and we as RPers cannot do that, lest we create the aforementioned chaos.

That said, the materiality issue comes in the "death knight"-ish character. You can't just face down legion lords without it being noteworthy, or be the only Night Elf in the Eastern Kingdoms. You change the sandbox by doing so. This applies in problems of power, uniqueness, or significant changes to the world and its characters.

I hope that helps.
My first nitpick is not in regard to lore, but it is entirely too wordy. You've got a lot of paragraphs in there that aren't really doing any work, and a lot of information that you don't need to have dragged out in a backstory.

A good backstory is a bird's eye view. It should describe briefly who this person is, what they do, and maybe go a little bit into explanatory detail. The rest should come out through RP or in other writing. Let people discover your character and enjoy the surprises, don't tell them everything, or even most of the details at the starting gate.

This is doubly so for MRP, TRP2 or Flag. You should have a short paragraph describing only things that you would expect a good amount of people to know. It shouldn't read like a biography.


As for lore and character consistency with it.

The biggest thing that I tell people is that you shouldn't create a character that matters in terms of the overall story. I borrow the accounting term of "materiality" to develop a paradigm for this.

The general idea is this: we rely on Blizzard to convey the facts on significant issues. They create the sandbox, they define the world in which we are playing, and therefore have the sole right to create material facts. If we allowed players to create material facts, we would have unmanageable chaos, and would create significant barriers to RP. (Why does it create barriers? Because you're demanding that everyone else interpret and accept your edits to established lore before they RP with you.)

RPers get to play with immaterial facts. It doesn't matter what my washed-up warden is up to. She's not about to turn the tide of any battles, create an international incident, or be the only one to learn how to juggle luckydos and drive steam tanks at the same time. If she did, such would be noteworthy, it would change the sandbox, and we as RPers cannot do that, lest we create the aforementioned chaos.

That said, the materiality issue comes in the "death knight"-ish character. You can't just face down legion lords without it being noteworthy, or be the only Night Elf in the Eastern Kingdoms. You change the sandbox by doing so. This applies in problems of power, uniqueness, or significant changes to the world and its characters.

I hope that helps.


I agree with most of that, I do however believe you can have just a couple noteworthy things unger your belt (For instance: X RPer is a veteran of Northrend and was with Tirion during the battle with the Lich King.).

I don't however think one should have "too many noteworthy feats under their belt. (For instance: Veteran of the First, Second, Third, Outland, Northrend, and Cataclysm wars, while also being the guy who defeated all of the raid bosses)
I agree with most of that, I do however believe you can have just a couple noteworthy things unger your belt (For instance: X RPer is a veteran of Northrend and was with Tirion during the battle with the Lich King.).

I don't however think one should have "too many noteworthy feats under their belt. (For instance: Veteran of the First, Second, Third, Outland, Northrend, and Cataclysm wars, while also being the guy who defeated all of the raid bosses)


You can have noteworthy things, but they can't be too noteworthy. It's the changing of the sandbox that is the issue. It's one thing to play in the sandbox, but it's quite another to introduce rocks to it.
Echoing what Kyalin said.

You could shave a few paragraphs off the story by cutting out how noteworthy they were terms of the story. You could say they served in the War of the Ancients, which is very likely as it was a global event. You could say they were in place at many of the major battles, but not significant cornerstones of the battles themselves.

Also being a necromantic Night elf in the Eastern Kingdoms is not very likely at all. She could have sailed over AFTER the Sundering and remained a recluse, but if she was a wanderer it's likely Humans, Dwarves, Gnomes or High elves would have come into contact with her at some point in the few thousand years since, making it highly improbable she would remain a wanderer for long.

Join the Conversation

Return to Forum