5.4 In Game Store 100% XP Buff/Transmog items?

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Well, I think you're heart's in the right place, but I'd be hard-pressed to believe that Blizzard is truly hurting with 8 million subscribers. The deal with Vivendi is definitely extremely sour news, but I simply cannot believe that they would be in a position where the current revenue being generated isn't still extravagant.

Plus, as many of us have said, they're better on working on the game proper and securing the existing subscriptions, which could even inspire others to re-sub, whereas the cash-shop holds zero appeal to those who don't play the game, and aren't really a compelling reason to *stay* subbed.

In truth, I have a feeling they thought 5.2 was going to go over better. I'll be honest, I actually like a lot of things Mists of Pandaria added; the continent is beautiful, I think Challenge Modes were a genius idea, and even though I would never have centered an entire expansion around them, I'm actually quite glad the Pandaren were added.

However, there are clearly issues that many people have voiced regarding this expansion, and no effort was put into fixing them. The constant barrage of dailies, the increasingly-arduous task of leveling -- an issue they've chosen not to fix, but to exploit, mind you -- and the "less-serious" nature of Pandaria.

They took a risk with Mists of Pandaria, and for as much pleasant content as I feel they added, it doesn't appear to have paid off in Spades like they were hoping. Rather than place the burden on an already shaky player-base, I think it would be more pragmatic to simply focus on delivering the content people actually want. Get to working on that next Expansion (I honestly don't think a lot of players will stick around for another year-and-some-months), and in the meantime, try to keep people interested. Personally, I would've done more things like the Warlock's Green-Fire quest-chain, but for different Classes, and reward these various Helms for the effort (ie. DK's get the Crown, Warlocks get Hood, and make more helms for other classes), because it would allow them to reuse existing content to generate more activity.


I /liked most of your posts and agree with many of the things you stated.

The Vivendi thing is a concern, but remember, Blizzard doesn't plan content at a moment's notice. It is done in advance and it seems that many things in MoP were designed with the store in mind. So, I don't think it was a knee jerk thing when this Vivendi stuff hit the fan. It may be that they knew this was coming as there was a specific date noted in the articles I read, on which Vivendi could start making increasing demands. Either way, they have been creating problems so they can exploit them with in game purchasable "fixes."

I absolutely agree that improving the quality of the content and the game as a whole is the better route for keeping customers. However, I also can't help but see the shift to short term profit being more important to them than the "bread and butter" players. Those of us who've maintained subs month after month, year after year.

Instead, the new model appears to be "grab as much cash as possible before they leave." In a way it makes sense, if you're speaking strictly to $$$ and quarterly reports, since the crowd they cater to is fickle and has no staying power. On the other hand, hurting their brand by flipping off loyal players is still bad business and will hurt not only this game but future titles.

There is also the fact that long term players are harder to please. We know what Blizz is capable of and we expect, or demand, the best. This new generation doesn't know what they're missing and seemingly couldn't care less. They're easy to work for. Rehash this, slap on that, throw something shiny in a shiny new store.

I really should just quit at this point, and I am looking for a new game or two to play instead. I'm just sad to see what's become of what I once thought of as a really good, fun, social game. This game could have gone on profitably for many more years IMO, if quality assurance and customer care were bigger priorities. I think long term they will see that. Sadly, it will be too late.


Agreed, although I don't necessarily view it as a "generational-gap", so much as the breadth of content they enjoy. There are a lot of players who play the game solely to raid, or solely to PvP. To those players, that content is the only thing they value, so everything else might seem "valueless" to them.

I would wager most players, however, have more than a single interest, and it's those players that are really hurt by the cash-shop. As I said in an earlier post, I actually view transmogrification as hugely compelling content, and I can't tell you how much time I've spent gathering transmog gear. Hell, the only reason I raided in Vanilla was to try and get the Judgement gear (you know, once it didn't look like a suit of Sapphiron-scale armor :P).

Right now, the cash-shop is affecting a whole new group of people, and between the transmog-helms, pets, and mounts, a lot of people are feeling robbed of content -- not just the items themselves, but the opportunity to *earn* the items, which I feel is the most important part. It's my hope that those who aren't affected will still encourage Blizzard to stop, because while their favored aspect of the game might not be affected now, it most certainly could be later.
07/18/2013 08:00 AMPosted by Alastayr
Your bad indeed because you don't know how to use quote tags.


How juvenile, calling someone bad because the quote tags were missing in one quote, keep on nitpicking calling him pops etc it just proves you are losing when you have to resort to personal attacks to prove your point. I got one thing to say, umadbro.
Any rubes that wish to further the suits' greedy gains by coughing up your hard-earned for shiny pixels - have at it!


By definition, every person who has ever paid money to Blizzard in order to play the game - and that would be every player since the game first went live - is a rube.

Because we're all furthering the suits' greedy gains by coughing up our hard-earned for shiny pixels.

Perspective.
07/18/2013 05:26 AMPosted by Brìggs
Don't want to transfer a character just to have heirlooms on a new server? Well there will be an answer for that.


Please don't say it, the store xp buff?

Awww man!

We have a pet and mount tab we can drag onto our bars, why can't their be a BoA tab or even a Tabard tab that can act in the same fashion?

Oh wait, Blizzard can't make any money from that, only spend more money developing the feature and that's a big 'no no'.

Am I right Blizzard?


Fyi the helm is available to characters across all realms but they can't find a way to do this with our boas, incredibly outrageous isn't it.

07/18/2013 01:06 PMPosted by Jujubiju
As Blizzard increases the number of micro-tranactions that are available, more and more new players will start playing WoW. By marketingt these specific products, they will be able to bring millions of new players to the game. Most of these players will have experience playing video games, but not MMOs.


I didn't see people flocking to SWToR when they went F2P.

Sorry but just because Bliz starts offering micro transactions does not mean people are going to flock to it.


Apparently the person you quoted thinks people have more money than sense and are willing to be nickel and dimed to death, and you're right people didn't flock to swtor when they went f2p the game has so damn many restrictions on f2p even though you can get to max level without paying the sub fee, just buying the extras that you need to play the game properly will cost you more than the 15 a month. Little things like rezes, access to content, being able to use all your professions, character slots.
Bioware made a way to make f2p pay through the nose.
I don't think it's outdated or irrelevant, because I DO feel betrayed. It seems like a lot of us do. If anything, I'd call that prophetic.

It's not that I have a problem with microtransactions per se. The issue is putting cool items behind paywalls while still requiring a monthly subscription. You can pick that apart all you want, but the unavoidable reality is that a lot of us long time customers are feeling disrespected and unappreciated by this.


What's out dated is the data, the information, it's pathetically outdated. But, he probably didn't notice the date. But as far as the emotional response to incoming micro-transactions, I said, that a small percentage of players are going to feel betrayed. That is obvious and was to be expected. As you said, a lot of long time customers are feeling disrespected and unappreciated. While that is not their intent, it is what happened. And they knew that was going to happen. It's sad, but unavoidable.

The bad news: We have to accept the fact that in terms of just raw numbers there are fewer and fewer long-time gamers (of any game). Many people have moved on in the past five years. There are fewer of us then there used to be. And for those of us that are left, many have far, far less time than we used to have.

The really bad news: As far as the percentage of long-time gamers relative to new gamers (of all ages, it's not just young people, many seniors are playing games for the first time), WE ARE SHOCKINGLY out numbered. Game companies are courting the new gamer. By the millions and millions. And by doing so they are making billions of dollars virtually all of which is from micro-transactions.

The good news: Game companies and gamers who keep a positive outlook and learn to adapt will survive and thrive. If you're so rigid that your brittle you're going to fail. Blizzard has to adapt and change. Or, it will lose its market position and will be perceived by gamers as being a huge dinosaur that isn't worth bothering with. It will laughed at then ignored by the contemporary gaming community.

Things change. It's not bad.
The bad news: We have to accept the fact that in terms of just raw numbers there are fewer and fewer long-time gamers (of any game). Many people have moved on in the past five years. There are fewer of us then there used to be. And for those of us that are left, many have far, far less time than we used to have.


/eyeroll

Need I remind you that there are 8 million people still paying for this game (note, I didn't say actually playing- I'd say that's possibly a smaller range- mayhap 7 million)?

A game will only go F2P when it knows for a fact, that a sub model is no longer viable in order for them to still turn a profit. WoW is still turning a profit. As I said, when SWToR went F2P- people didn't suddenly start flocking it.

I have no idea how this whole discussion turned into a "WoW's becoming F2P" discussion.
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The major questions of this thread are this:

"Do we- as a player base- think that Blizzard should be putting up things like XP boosts/lesser charms in a cash shop?"

"Do we- as a player base- find it acceptable that instead of putting up the occasional mount/pet on the store it's becoming more of a common thing?"

"Is $15 for a transmog item considered entirely too much for one item?"

Those are the questions of this thread. We've kind of deviated from those questions.
07/18/2013 01:51 PMPosted by Tantrevalles
Any rubes that wish to further the suits' greedy gains by coughing up your hard-earned for shiny pixels - have at it!


By definition, every person who has ever paid money to Blizzard in order to play the game - and that would be every player since the game first went live - is a rube.

Because we're all furthering the suits' greedy gains by coughing up our hard-earned for shiny pixels.

Perspective.


Yours is not a "definition" of paying for a game in order to play it. Paying for vanity items is not the same as necessary content to play.

Perspective? Invest in a dictionary next time before you post. ;)
Apritte - idk, I feel like long-time players are the torch bearers and evangelizers for WoW and the Blizzard brand, which is why I feel like they're shooting themselves in the foot by snubbing this particular demographic. I could be wrong, maybe I have a heightened sense of importance. But I'm with the old breed, the people that became Blizzard fans back in the 90s, when Warcraft and all the IPs Blizzard currently have were created. How else are they going to attract new players to decades old franchises but on the strength of players who grew up with them and swear by them enough to entice new players to try them? It seems unwise.
BTW, I agree 100% with Aranel.


/fistbump
Yours is not a "definition" of paying for a game in order to play it. Paying for vanity items is not the same as necessary content to play.

Perspective? Invest in a dictionary next time before you post. ;)


It's exactly the same. It's ALL pixels.
Yours is not a "definition" of paying for a game in order to play it. Paying for vanity items is not the same as necessary content to play.

Perspective? Invest in a dictionary next time before you post. ;)


It's exactly the same. It's ALL pixels.


A product for entertainment or a pasttime such as WoW is of course "pixels" because it's done on a computer screen. But adding things that are merely for vanity or e-peen purposes is not needed for the product to function.
A product for entertainment or a pasttime such as WoW is of course "pixels" because it's done on a computer screen. But adding things that are merely for vanity or e-peen purposes is not needed for the product to function.


You're trying to split a hair. You're failing.

People are buying those helmets because it increases their sense of entertainment.

People solo old raids - kill hundreds of hours doing it - for e-peen and vain reasons.

Frankly, buying things through a cash store is saner by comparison.
07/18/2013 02:10 PMPosted by Caolela
Yours is not a "definition" of paying for a game in order to play it. Paying for vanity items is not the same as necessary content to play.


None of the items in the cash shop are necessary. If I choose to not buy anything from the cash shop my gaming experience has not changed, I am still playing the same game I was before the cash shop existed.
So I guess further down the line when they add shoulders, chest piece, belt, bracers, gloves, pants, and boots at $15 bucks a pop you guys will have no problem shelling out $120 for a set of transmog.
Did Diablo 3 experience a population explosion when they started focusing on microtransactions? I don't think so. :/

As I remember it, the game started with a huge population, and now...now it's a shadow of its former self.


I don't think thats the ONLY reason the game's population went down
So I guess further down the line when they add shoulders, chest piece, belt, bracers, gloves, pants, and boots at $15 bucks a pop you guys will have no problem shelling out $120 for a set of transmog.


No problem whatsoever, if that's how you roll.

Again: how you approach the game does nothing to increase or decrease the satisfaction I get from how I approach the game.
So I guess further down the line when they add shoulders, chest piece, belt, bracers, gloves, pants, and boots at $15 bucks a pop you guys will have no problem shelling out $120 for a set of transmog.


Nope, I have no plan in buying any of it. But neither will I tell anyone else that they shouldn't.

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