[Spoiler Alert] Thrall in Cataclysm

Story Forum
The epic of Gilgamesh carries a striking resemblance to the story of Thrall. Gilgamesh's best friend, Inkidu, dies. As a result he is torn and in grief. He relinquishes his responsibility as king and warrior. He surrenders his kingly garments. He wears animal skin and lets his hair go and become matted and messy. He leave the great-walled city of Uruk and travels to the edge of the world to find the answer to his problems. He then travels across the Waters of Death on a boat and reaches his destination.
Do you agree? Are there similarities between Cataclysm and one of the oldest stories known to man? Or is there nothing original anymore and this is no big deal.
What?

The only similarity is that Thrall was a ruler and now he isn't. That's where they end.
There is a book called "The Shattering". Christie Golden goes into depth describing the circumstances of Thrall's departure. He meets a lady orc in Nagrand, poison on Hellscream's blade kills Cairne Bloodhoof. It is the event in this book I am referring too. If you were speeding through quests in the event going on now, I agree. Thrall was a ruler and then he isn't. Period.
...which makes this trope Older Than Dirt.

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http://www.fanfiction.net/u/2348118/
...which makes this trope Older Than Dirt.

Probably older than Gilgamesh too. I'm not sure on the timelines here, but the Egyptian god Ra makes a similar journey daily.
Oldest known literature. Gilgamesh was an interesting reading, particularly the chatacter of Enkidu who was created by the Gods to be his equal, and subsequently was the only person he ever really loved.

I don't know if you were originally referencing Ogrim being the Enkidu-character, or Grom. Main difference here I think is that Thrall's journey isn't one of trying to find Immortality for himself (though there is some logic in saying Thrall is a Demi-God when you take in his relation with the Elemental Spirits, power wise). There could definitely be an interesting analogy if you tried to make the flower/lotus he finds to be Shamanism, and perhaps Garrosh being the Snake whom snatched it away from Thrall's people...

Not that Garrosh has stopped or outlawed Shamanism, but he certainly is moving the Orcs away from the mindset that produces outstanding shaman.
Come to think of it, Grom being Enkidu makes a lot of sense if you look at it from a Warcraft 3 perspective. Thrall and Grom head into the Ancient Forest and slay the great beast Mannoroth, and Grom dies... possibly sparking Thrall's interesting in finding shamanism for his people (the flower that restores youth).
Thrall had a deep affinity for Cairne Bloodhoof, a dear friend. Then Cairne dies, he is like the Enkidu figure. Enkidu used to roam the wilderness, two-thirds beast, just like the Tauren race.
Also a good comparison, Vish, but I don't recall Thrall and Cairne ever taking down some beast that lead to Cairne's death.
There is a book called "The Shattering". Christie Golden goes into depth describing the circumstances of Thrall's departure. He meets a lady orc in Nagrand, poison on Hellscream's blade kills Cairne Bloodhoof. It is the event in this book I am referring too. If you were speeding through quests in the event going on now, I agree. Thrall was a ruler and then he isn't. Period.


Yes, I am familiar with the somewhat mediocre novel. I have read it.

Thrall left long before Cairne died though. Cairne wasn't the catalyst for any of Thrall's actions, something entirely unrelated was.

Thrall left long before Cairne died though. Cairne wasn't the catalyst for any of Thrall's actions, something entirely unrelated was.


You must have skimmed through it. There was a moment at the end of the novel where Thrall returned to Kalimdor. He grieved for his dead friend. It was then that his absence from the throne was no longer temporary, but he decided to make it permanent. Do you remember when he was looking on Cairne's dead body and he took off his armor and set it in a pile on the ground? It was a pretty good scene. It sounds like you just did a google search on the book to come up with a witty response =/
Thrall left long before Cairne died though. Cairne wasn't the catalyst for any of Thrall's actions, something entirely unrelated was.


You must have skimmed through it. There was a moment at the end of the novel where Thrall returned to Kalimdor. He grieved for his dead friend. It was then that his absence from the throne was no longer temporary, but he decided to make it permanent. Do you remember when he was looking on Cairne's dead body and he took off his armor and set it in a pile on the ground? It was a pretty good scene. It sounds like you just did a google search on the book to come up with a witty response =/


That's still not the catalyst for Thrall leaving though. With Gilgamesh, his friends death was the catalyst for him leaving. Thrall had already decided to leave before Cairne was killed.

So no, you're basically seeing something that isn't there.

Yes, I am familiar with the somewhat mediocre novel. I have read it.


Such a hater, man. I don't know why you still play the game.


Sue me. I don't like Golden's work.

Especially with humans. She is really bad at writing humans.

She knows how to write two types of humans: Jaina or Blackmoore. Hippies or Jerkasses. I haven't really seen any middle-ground with her.

I want Jeff Grubb back.
Thrall did leave. He sailed to the Maelstrom, to Deepholm. I am not referring to when he left to Nagrand. He came back from Nagrand and then left again.
If you look closely enough, chances are you'll find similarities in pretty much every story ever told.
What are you talking about Vyrin? It is like you totally don't understand what anyone else is saying, just so you can sound smart. They are comparing and contrasting Gilgamesh and Thrall. The event after Cairne's death with Thrall in Mulgore and the event in Tablet XII of the epic of Gilgamesh. If this stuff is too hard to follow, you can just ask questions and be polite. Stop trying to be a know-it-all who is wrong, I am embarrased for you.
If you look closely enough, chances are you'll find similarities in pretty much every story ever told.
Of course you can.

The all use words!

It's a conspiracy, fomented by those dirty linguists! Return us all to the glorious days of yore, with expressive grunting!

Hng grr. Hrrrrrnnngggggggggg!

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