StarCraft® II

I'm a Theoretical Physicist. Ask me things.

Posts: 7
( This was primarily inspired by another "ask me things" post.

Exactly what the title says.
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Posts: 3,739
Can you please explain, simply, the basic premise of string theory and quantum mechanics. I am hideous at physics.

Also I am flattered. <3.
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Posts: 7
Can you please explain, simply, the basic premise of string theory and quantum mechanics. I am hideous at physics.

Also I am flattered. <3.


String Theory basically states that electrons and quarks are not 0-dimensional objects, but 1-dimensional oscillating "strings". In layman's terms, these strings connect all of the electrons within an atom.

As for Quantum Physics, it states that, as humorous as this may sound, anything can happen at any time for any reason. Typically, these "random events" are explained with electrons, which, according to this theory, are simultaneously waves and spheres.

Thanks for asking, hope I helped!
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Posts: 3,739
So you're telling me that a mutalisk could appear if I finish this sentence? I find it unlikely. It seems like the rhetoric of "well what if the sun DOESN'T rise tomorrow?" well, there is always a chance, but it is very remote.

Would these quantum events be something that could be predicted?
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Posts: 149
What do you think of quantum entanglement? I took my first college physics course last semester, and my professor seemed to think it was a bunch of *ahem* "BS", yet I read about it all the time.
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Posts: 5,282
Can you please explain, simply, the basic premise of string theory and quantum mechanics. I am hideous at physics.

Also I am flattered. <3.


String Theory basically states that electrons and quarks are not 0-dimensional objects, but 1-dimensional oscillating "strings". In layman's terms, these strings connect all of the electrons within an atom.

As for Quantum Physics, it states that, as humorous as this may sound, anything can happen at any time for any reason. Typically, these "random events" are explained with electrons, which, according to this theory, are simultaneously waves and spheres.

Thanks for asking, hope I helped!


I've seen the NOVA episode for that twice, Didn't quite get what they were talking about.
Thank you for the simple explication.


Separate question:

Why (to an outside observer) would you appear to 'freeze' as you approached the event horizon of a black hole?

As you passed the 'light can't escape' line wouldn't you (to an outside observer) just look like someone was erasing you on a photo-shop program?
Ex: one of those child draw on it things that have metal shavings in them. You swipe the magnet (in this case our event horizion) and the picture vanishes along the magnets line.

Please tell me if I'm not being clear.



Additionally, since objects are supposed to appear to stop as they approach the event horizon, would a black hole not look like a sphere of mass that it was going to absorb?
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Posts: 5,282
While I understand that the event horizon is not a physical thing, what shape is it? A sphere?



12/23/2011 10:58 AMPosted by Astrai
or two regions, if it's a rotating black hole


How do you get two regions where escape velocity exceeds the speed of light?
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Posts: 3,739
It just means his special theory of relativity is wrong. It also changes a great many things in theoretical physics. I think our expert needs to explain all this to us, as well as explain the ramifications of such a particle the rest of physics which basically assumed einstein was right.
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Posts: 289
What is the best way to fry fish?
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Posts: 142
Hi,

I'm a theoretical physicist too. I'll try to answer some questions in this post from time to time.

If a particle travels faster than light, then Einstein's relativity is not broken. In fact, special relativity (that's relativity without gravity) allows for the existence of faster-than-light particles (I'll call them FLTP just to be concise). It doesn't allow a slower-than-light particle to be accelerated at a speed faster than the speed of light. But it doesn't mean Einstein is wrong.

The biggest ramification of FTLP is the reversal of causality (aka time travel). One can show (it's surprisingly easy) that if a particle travels faster than light, it travels backwards in time for certain inertial frame (for someone traveling at a given speed relative to the source of FTLP). Therefore, it becomes possible to send message back in time.

This is not a problem in Einstein's theory. In fact, since these particles travel faster than light (if they existed), we couldn't interact with them. In particular, we couldn't control them to send a specific message backward in time.

The 'big deal' with FTL neutrinos at OPERA is that we could control them and therefore send a specific message backward in times.
Personally, I would send the release date of Diablo 3 and Heart of the Swarm to us right now.

To fry a fish, have you tried a femto-second pulsed laser?

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Posts: 16
Should I major in physics? I'd like to, but I've heard horror stories about employment opportunities. (Engineer vs Scientist)
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Posts: 289
01/09/2012 06:46 AMPosted by MaxPower
To fry a fish, have you tried a femto-second pulsed laser?


No, it sounds rather expensive, and i am afraid that it would damage the fish. also when i attempt to cover the fish in bread crumbs it just becomes really dry.
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Posts: 142
Starscreamer, of course you should major in physics.

You should look at these data from the American Physical Society :
http://www.aps.org/careers/statistics/index.cfm

There are jobs for physicists, you have to sell your skills at the employer though. A physicist can do anyway, he / she doesn't how to yet.
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Posts: 89
Your definitely not a theoretical physicist, I call your bluff on that. Your freakin bronze bro...no one that bad at sc2 could be a theoretical physicist.

*troll bait*
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Posts: 1,522
Why do microwaves get reflected by metals and absorbed by di-polar substances and pass through other matierals all together? Does time stop at zero Kelvin? Does energy bend the time part of space time fabric while matter bends the space portion of it (really only relevant if time does stop at 0 Kelvin as I have heard)?
02/03/2012 03:13 PMPosted by HuMoDz
And, according to thermodinamycs, you cannot reach 0 kelvin

Why is it impossible to reach 0 kelvin?
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Posts: 1,522
ok so we can't get to zero kelvin because of zero point energy, doesn't really answer many questions (explaining something I don't understand/know with something else I don't understand/know), but I suppose now my more important question is why do microwaves get reflected by metals, absorbed by dipolar matierials, and largely pass though everything else?
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