Considder Your Science Questions Answered

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THere was something on TV that seemed to imply that the farther the distance is between two objects moving relative to each other, the greater difference in the perception of what everything was "at that instant" would be. It didn't seem to be talking about seeing/perceiving things at the speed of light. It had something to do with future, past, and present all existing for everyone.

But I don't see why distance would increase this effect.


Point is, light does not travel instantly. The farther away two things are, the longer it takes for light to get from one to the other and back.
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Please slow down a notch.

60 second post limit you know.
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Why is the universe cooling down? (Yes yes, I like the temperature :) )
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THere was something on TV that seemed to imply that the farther the distance is between two objects moving relative to each other, the greater difference in the perception of what everything was "at that instant" would be. It didn't seem to be talking about seeing/perceiving things at the speed of light. It had something to do with future, past, and present all existing for everyone.

But I don't see why distance would increase this effect.


Point is, light does not travel instantly. The farther away two things are, the longer it takes for light to get from one to the other and back.


THere was something on TV that seemed to imply that the farther the distance is between two objects moving relative to each other, the greater difference in the perception of what everything was "at that instant" would be. It didn't seem to be talking about seeing/perceiving things at the speed of light. It had something to do with future, past, and present all existing for everyone.

But I don't see why distance would increase this effect.


Point is, light does not travel instantly. The farther away two things are, the longer it takes for light to get from one to the other and back.


THat's what I am not sure about. It was using pictures and time-space continuum slices to describe everything so it didn't need to use the words I am using right now so I am not sure if they were talking about the state of the universe as seen by observer "sees" at that instant or the actual state of the universe at that instant at the location of the observer.
Edited by Toortanga on 8/6/2012 7:17 PM PDT
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08/06/2012 07:13 PMPosted by lIllIIIlIlII
Why is the universe cooling down? (Yes yes, I like the temperature :) )


Matter particles are getting farther and farther away from each other. With the universe getting less dense, there are less particles per unit volume to impart thermal energy.

Scientists believe that the universe will eventually expand into a cloud of hydrogen gas and subatomic particles resting neatly above absolute zero.
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THat's what I am not sure about. It did not seem to be saying anything about viewing the other observer so it seemed to be talking about the definition of the universe to the observer at that instant. It was using pictures and time-space continuum slices so it didn't need to use the words I am using right now so I am not sure if they were talking about the state of the universe that the observer "sees" at that instant or if they were talking about the universe at that instant.


It most likely is.

For example, you never see the distant universe as it is at our point in time.

Say you look at a star 5 billion lightyears away -- Because light does not travel instantly, what you are actually looking at is the light (And therefore, the image) of that star 5 billion years ago -- Thus, whenever you do look at anything that isn't relatively local (I.E.: The sun), you are looking at an incredibly ancient version of it -- you will never (Assuming you don't travel to it) see the current goings-on of the universe, only the past.
Edited by Metherlance on 8/6/2012 7:20 PM PDT
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08/06/2012 07:17 PMPosted by EugeneTwo
Why is the universe cooling down? (Yes yes, I like the temperature :) )


Matter particles are getting farther and farther away from each other. With the universe getting less dense, there are less particles per unit volume to impart thermal energy.

Scientists believe that the universe will eventually expand into a cloud of hydrogen gas and subatomic particles resting neatly above absolute zero.


Nice answer. But what I heard, after fully expanding, the universe will shrink again, so the temperature will rise and in the end, matter will be extremly dense and hot again, which will then cause a Big Bang and the universe will expand once again. (screw my english!!!)
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08/06/2012 07:20 PMPosted by lIllIIIlIlII
Nice answer. But what I heard, after fully expanding, the universe will shrink again, so the temperature will rise and in the end, matter will be extremly dense and hot again, which will then cause a Big Bang and the universe will expand once again. (screw my english!!!)


There is no evidence that the universe will ever "fully expand" -- in fact, currently, the universe seems to be expanding at an accelerating rate.
Edited by Metherlance on 8/6/2012 7:23 PM PDT
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08/06/2012 07:14 PMPosted by RootKit
Why is gravity such a weak force?


Scientists believe gravity is weak because it has to affect matter in 11 dimensions, so its effect within our 3D space is relatively small..

08/06/2012 07:14 PMPosted by RootKit
Why is the Sun's Corona (atmosphere layer) so much hotter than the Sun's surface


Scientists recently discovered tiny microjets pocketing the sun's surface which constantly release cloude of plasma. These clouds are released slowly enough to not fly up and out of the sun, but fast enough to get into the corona and hang there.

08/06/2012 07:14 PMPosted by RootKit
What governs the transition of quarks and gluons into pions and nucleons?


Mathematical equations which describe the decay of gluons into pions which can therefore screw around with nearby nucleons and changing their quark composistion.

08/06/2012 07:14 PMPosted by RootKit
Why is the interaction between the strong and weak so force different


Different particles with different equations and different wavefunctions.
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The real question is: Does the force of Gravity outweigh the force of expansion, and does is the force of expansion simply a residual effect from the big bang?


Currently, gravity does not outweigh expansion. I sure hope the universe does not rip...
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Also, it seems the big problem with string theory is that there are multiple versions of it but they all account for general relativity and quantum mechanics and that the holes that string theory is supposed to fill in are not testable?

Is that the actual problem? That both general relativity and quantum mechanics answer everything for all cases that we can actually test, but the remaining holes in these two theories are all scenarios that we cannot actually test and we can come up with more than one theory that satisfies all current testable things?
Edited by Toortanga on 8/6/2012 7:27 PM PDT
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Where is god hiding?
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Also, it seems the big problem with string theory is that there are multiple versions of it but they all account for general relativity and quantum mechanics and that the string theory itself is not testable.

Is that the actual problem? That both general relativity and quantum mechanics answer everything for all cases that we can actually test and that the holes left behind that string theorys fills in are all cases that we can't practically test?


More or less. I'll admit I haven't brushed up on my string theory in a while, but the main problem is that it is largely untest(ed/able). There's no real evidence to support string theory yet -- endorsing it would be basically equivalent to endorsing the existence of unicorns.

08/06/2012 07:26 PMPosted by gravehippo
Where is god hiding?


While that would be an interesting question to actually answer, there is no non-douchey way to answer it where it upsets one major group of people or another. Hence why it's a bad idea to answer religious questions with science.
Edited by Metherlance on 8/6/2012 7:28 PM PDT
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08/06/2012 07:14 PMPosted by RootKit
Why can't we observe Evolution?


Because it hapens over the course of generations. We can speed up evolution through artificial selection, but then it would be predicatable.

08/06/2012 07:14 PMPosted by RootKit
(Why do large space objects like planets that orbit black holes behave nearly identically to the manner in which electrons orbit a nucleus, yet the physics that governs them is vastly different?)


On the quantum level, electrons are attracted to atoms through electromagnetic force, but planets are attracted to stars through gravitational force. Here is the thing, electromagnetic force also repells.
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What are your thoughts behind the double slit experiment?

Also, can you explain the experiments wherein scientists create twin particles then switch one particles spin which cause the other partner particle to change it's spin to compensate. They say that this effect does not obey the law of nothing traveling faster than light as they say it's an instant effect regardless of the space between the particles. I wish I could give you more information on this experiment but I only read it in passing.
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Also, it seems the big problem with string theory is that there are multiple versions of it but they all account for general relativity and quantum mechanics and that the string theory itself is not testable.

Is that the actual problem? That both general relativity and quantum mechanics answer everything for all cases that we can actually test and that the holes left behind that string theorys fills in are all cases that we can't practically test?


More or less. I'll admit I haven't brushed up on my string theory in a while, but the main problem is that it is largely untest(ed/able). There's no real evidence to support string theory yet -- endorsing it would be basically equivalent to endorsing the existence of unicorns.


But why is it untestable overall? Does current quantum theory and general relativity really explain everything that we can actually get at between the two theories? And the only things that are not answered are scenarios that involve extremely high gravities over very small distances- none of which we have access to?

Because normally you'd think it's pretty good if you can come up with one thing to explain what everything that used to be explained by two separate theories - even if it doesn't explain anything new. At least that's what it seems like to me.

Is it not still worthwhile to see what predictions each of the variants of string theory make about these untestable scenarios?
Edited by Toortanga on 8/6/2012 7:35 PM PDT
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Posts: 3,256
Also, it seems the big problem with string theory is that there are multiple versions of it but they all account for general relativity and quantum mechanics and that the holes that string theory is supposed to fill in are not testable?

Is that the actual problem? That both general relativity and quantum mechanics answer everything for all cases that we can actually test, but the remaining holes in these two theories are all scenarios that we cannot actually test and we can come up with more than one theory that satisfies all current testable things?


The reason we cannot test string theory is that, in order to probe something, we must probe it with something smaller. But string theory says, nothing is smaller than strings. If only we can probe using the very fabric of spacetime.

And... we cannot use a galaxy-sized accelarator to probe string theory because, the more energy you give a string, it eventually gets BIGGER, making it a terrible probe.
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what happens inside a black hole?
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