StarCraft® II

Why was the HoTS campaign so underwhelming?

I had a blast playing HOTS, idk what you guys are talking about.
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dissident
jeopardize
renegade
substantial
cache
brimming
commence
snide
uncannily
eradicated
liberated
Praetor
epitaph
wearied
vicinity
perimeter
adjected
impunity
punctual
vile
remnants
adversary
debark
extreme prejudice
prelate
emanating
The vocabulary of Kerrigan in Brood Wars was at a college level vs Kerrigan in Heart Of the Swarm where the vocabulary is at the level between Middle school and High school.
Also the grammar seems broken English. There were much fragments. For example, sentence without the subject was left out. In brood wars, every sentence was complete sentence.


People generally talk in sentence fragments, and if you look at her vocabulary pre-infestation in the Rebel Yell campaign, it's mightily incongruous with her vocabulary post-infestation. Just look at some of Hemingway's dialogue. Holy hell, there's broken English. It isn't uncommon to see an entire question posed as a single word, and not just someone asking for clarification either, like "what?"

It isn't uncommon in the real world and in good dialogue for someone to, for example, ask if someone would like a martini simply by holding up a glass and saying, "Martini?" Only in formal settings would you generally expect someone to say, "Would you like a martini?"

Believe it or not, complex sentences are actually pretty damned rare in normal speech, even for educated people, simply because we aren't conditioned to talk that way.
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Underwhelming? very much disagree.

The emotional attachments you get to the characters (if you are open to those things) especially kerrigan is a hallmark of what a great book or story should achieve with its audience.

The dialogue was a lot less cheesy than wings and more in tone with appropriate amount of communication via facial/emotional expressions rather than wordy dialogues.

If you pay close attention to the scenes/story it is pretty deep. Personally it was a pleasure to play through it.
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It isn't uncommon in the real world and in good dialogue for someone to, for example, ask if someone would like a martini simply by holding up a glass and saying, "Martini?" Only in formal settings would you generally expect someone to say, "Would you like a martini?"

Believe it or not, complex sentences are actually pretty damned rare in normal speech, even for educated people, simply because we aren't conditioned to talk that way.


Agreed. Except that starcraft is a story comprised of rulers and the elite interacting at a grand level. I doubt military advisors in the pentagon when planning missions use one word questions very often. Why? Because it is not precise (or formal). Precision and clarity is needed when you are having these sorts of conversations. Heck, large scale wars could start from a simple misunderstanding between leaders. That is why leaders are typically very careful and picky with the words they use, even with their bitter enemies.
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Mmm I liked it better than WOL for the campaign. Everything in WOL felt completely inconsequential with the exception of the great Toss missions. The linearity of HOTS made it much better for presentation.

WoL from a gameplay perspective was probably more engaging, though, simply because of the immense power of kerrigan and the roach/hydra [or if you got a little impatient critical mass banelings] conquering basically everything.

HotS addresses one of the biggest story aspects of the Starcraft Universe, and I see some of you saying that "it isn't representative of the races". Of course not, Kerrigan is the swarm, she controls all of it and it's tailored to her actions. No one in the Swarm has the ability to contest her [unless Stokolov is Amon [Zagara says something about being unable to get into his mind]. The Zerg is fundamentally changed after this game too, and it has sweeping consequences for the universe [it also means Kerrigan is going to die or become a XN pawn or SC3 will look awfully silly!].

The most dissatisfying things for me, other than Kerrigan actually thinking Raynor is dead from the king of propaganda himself are the intro worlds, with the exception of Char, because they're kinda meaningless.
Edited by PlatinumST on 3/19/2013 11:39 PM PDT
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I don't doubt that that was their goal, but intelligent people do not talk like that. That sounds like what an average person might think an eloquent person sounds like, but it isn't actually the case. Good/well-trained speakers try to avoid that kind of archaic and stilted language as much as possible. Minimalism in speech is to be prized over verbosity. Kerrigan sounded smarter when she was uninfested.


Hard to argue with such a subjective statement. Not even sure if I have an opinion on this. Can't really prove your opinion wrong anyway. All I'll say is that a large vocabulary helps you articulate your thoughts more accurately as well as provide some diversity to your speech which, in turn, makes you more interesting to listen to. Conversations that are stripped down to the bone.. well it's going to get boring if all you ever hear is acknowledgements and yes/no questions.


People generally talk in sentence fragments, and if you look at her vocabulary pre-infestation in the Rebel Yell campaign, it's mightily incongruous with her vocabulary post-infestation. Just look at some of Hemingway's dialogue. Holy hell, there's broken English. It isn't uncommon to see an entire question posed as a single word, and not just someone asking for clarification either, like "what?"

It isn't uncommon in the real world and in good dialogue for someone to, for example, ask if someone would like a martini simply by holding up a glass and saying, "Martini?" Only in formal settings would you generally expect someone to say, "Would you like a martini?"

Believe it or not, complex sentences are actually pretty damned rare in normal speech, even for educated people, simply because we aren't conditioned to talk that way.


I'd say that day to day informal speech habits have little to do with alien races. Not much to do with the highest echelons of Terrans, either. They tend to pay extreme attention to the way that they present themselves to the world and have a persona they hold themselves to. Comfortable or "efficient" speech becomes irrelevant. It's just another case of sacrificing comfort for style.
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Too many missions based on timers in one way or another killed most of it for me. Having to wait until the very end for a mission where I could complete objectives at my pace was pretty !@#$%^- stupid.

But I still liked HotS overall.
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03/17/2013 08:54 PMPosted by Joshua
"Cerebrate, you watched over my during my incubation, and I am grateful to you. It is my wish that you continue your vigil, so that I might strengthen my powers to better aid the Swarm. I have been unable to access the totality of my latent powers, and as such, I would like to infiltrate a Terran science vessel and uncover the secrets of their abandoned Ghost projects. If I can learn more about their mental conditioning, I can undo the damage their tinkering scientists have done to my mind."


... I'm not saying you're wrong to feel the way you do about this game, but damn, people do not talk like that. That sounds far too archaic and stilted for it to be real.


Just an aside, but what's archaic about any of that ? Seems like pretty common language when one is speaking formally. She's speaking as if to a superior, or so it feels like to me, so being formal is pretty natural.
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Over all, I liked HotS. I do think there were missed opportunities in the story.

Narud, Duran - Had it been revealed for sure in the books that these are one in the same? If yes then Kerrigan's fight with Narud was wasted in HotS. They could have done more to tie the two together. They still have an opportunity to tie them together in LotV I think.

Zeratul - When Kerrigan and Zeratul meet in HotS, that was a great place for a few premonition missions similar to the ihan-protoss missions in WoL. Zeratul could have been still been the lead up to the Zerus missions but, that section of HotS felt like back story and it was thin.
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Good dialog is not supposed to be like how we actually talk. It is far more to the point and clever then anyone could actually be. This is to communicate personality. Bad dialog is how we talk every day, not very compelling. SC1 had great dialog because it had the fresh to the point feel and gave the characters depth that communicated their personalities.

In short dialog should not be the same as how normal people talk or your writing it wrong. And even given that they may have been trying to write the characters more "Realistically" (lol) they still sound like immature children. They sound nothing like actual adults who are in charge of peoples lives, something SC1 was able to do much better.
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In terms of gameplay, I think HotS was more interesting, but it continued the downward spiral of storytelling in starcraft. Here are my chief concerns.

- Mengsk. The badass, cut-throat political genius who restructured terran society from the base up, placing himself on the top of the heap. Or at least thats who he was in the original Starcraft. In wings of liberty I was appalled to see him transform into an incompetent buffoon, becoming a two-dimensional classic bad guy. In the history of the world, no dictatorship would be so incompetent as to allow the whole Lockwell/Vermillion newscasts. I mean, this is supposed to be state propaganda, and we have Lockwell telling everyone that Raynor is saving lives, while Vermillion stutters incompetently in the background. I'm fine with him dying, but the fact that he never even mentioned that Kerrigan murdered his father completely removes what should have been his real reasons for wanting her dead. All in all, he stopped being impressive a long time ago, and i'm glad he's dead. There will be no further indignities on this once great character.

-Kerrigan. As has been said before, she must have hit her head between Brood War and WoL. Some people are saying that her vocabulary in BW was unrealistic, but I think that it reinforced her identity as 'Queen' of the zerg. Now she's just like the Zergs mom. However much Mengsk was willing to murder to gain power, she was equally willing to murder millions for revenge. The fact that in the final missions she decides to spare a few doesn't change the fact that she's basically still as evil as mengsk, and no matter how much she cares for Jim, it doesn't make her the good guy. I'm fine with her being evil or good, but her goodness seemed very contrived. Its bizarre how she accepted Mengsk's report of Jim's death without question, equally as bizarre as how she transformes back into zerg without a second thought as to what that means.

-I refuse to believe Duran died without him at least showing his Samir form. Since i refuse to believe he's dead, this part doesn't bother me.... yet.

-Big Brained Cerebrates > Herp Derp Queens
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TLDR: I really really liked the game. But I'm concerned that video games lose some things when they try to copy movies. And that we shouldn't lose those things.

Well I agree mostly with SpacemanNik as well, but I want to also say; A lot and I mean a lot of Narrative Dissonance. RTS games have this problem pretty badly anyway, but it was way more noticeable then WOL.

Ewww. I had to google that terminology. (I'm ewwing at your art-speak, not the game.)

All I can say is this "art envy" on the part of game designers is downright creepy. It feels so forced. No wonder they put a huge shot of Kerrigan's butt in a scene where two women were discussing leadership; some Hollywood type probably said the seen needed more sex.

The vocabulary of Kerrigan in Brood Wars was at a college level vs Kerrigan in Heart Of the Swarm where the vocabulary is at the level between Middle school and High school.
Also the grammar seems broken English. There were much fragments. For example, sentence without the subject was left out. In brood wars, every sentence was complete sentence.

It looks like video games used to take inspiration from written media, like novels and comics. But today they have Hollywood envy and just want to deliver action scenes and boob shots. Can we blame them, when movies make so much money?

Movies are made to watch in an audience though, and you have to make a trip to the theatre. While the other media was read alone on your own time. Which is why novels -- and once upon a time, video games -- could have such detailed stories. So copying movies 100% is partly a loss.
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They really murdered the storyline with vast character personality switches and the intensely obvious storyline. I enjoyed all other starcraft games because there was no real way to guess the ending, or most of the campaign straight from the start. Hell, even WOL was a shocker when I discovered it was about getting Sarah back to human... Then having her pull a dumb-!@#$ stereotypical women rationalization upon hearing that raynor, was killed by the most unreliable source of information in the known universe, and decided to pull some epic stupidity the entire campaign just so we can mildly understand the storyline sofar and what is going on in the background of LOTV.
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Upon completion of the campaign I felt the same way. I had fun at times, but there were many other times I had to try to have fun.
It could have been the story my heart wasn't in. Maybe it was the emphasis on characters that have been watered down and are no longer interesting (Raynor and most disappointingly Kerrigan).
Mechanically there was a lot of handholding and forced events. I enjoy the different objectives for the missions, but I kept waiting for a 'here is the enemy on the map, use your weakened position and forces to overcome the enemy.' Like the Omega. Back then you fought multiple armies all with their own attack plans and defenses to overcome. If they were going to nuke you it was part of the AI's plan. Not a trigger for when I move forces through an area. Or instantly spawned enemies for being overly aggresive while trying to mine two steaming pikes of dead critter for the big primal zerg.
Guess I just miss not having more options. In SC1 I could take the hard road and just destroy the base, but I could also take the easy way and just do whatever the mission objective is while fighting off attack parties.
*sigh* Oh well. I enjoyed it anyway despite it's flaws, and will settle for it.

Forget Kerrigan falling for it but who else thought it was weird that Mengsk would shoot himself in the foot by telling Kerrigan and worlds that Raynor was dead? I can understand him wanting to draw Kerrigan out so he wouldn't have to worry about her forever, because he couldn't think she would just give up after thinking him dead. Still didn't need to provoke her; she was coming for you anyway, Mengsk.
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03/20/2013 12:06 AMPosted by Mora
I don't doubt that that was their goal, but intelligent people do not talk like that. That sounds like what an average person might think an eloquent person sounds like, but it isn't actually the case. Good/well-trained speakers try to avoid that kind of archaic and stilted language as much as possible. Minimalism in speech is to be prized over verbosity. Kerrigan sounded smarter when she was uninfested.


03/20/2013 12:06 AMPosted by Mora
Hard to argue with such a subjective statement. Not even sure if I have an opinion on this. Can't really prove your opinion wrong anyway. All I'll say is that a large vocabulary helps you articulate your thoughts more accurately as well as provide some diversity to your speech which, in turn, makes you more interesting to listen to. Conversations that are stripped down to the bone.. well it's going to get boring if all you ever hear is acknowledgements and yes/no questions.


A large vocab helps, sure, but just because you have it doesn't mean you need to demonstrate it. In fact, using a lot of esoteric words can confuse a lot of people pretty fast, or at least make you hard to follow. Even with a large vocab, it's still a question of using the right word for the right job, and no more than what you need. Using a particular kind of speech to identify a character is a tried and true story-telling technique, but even then, in the real world, regardless of how people talk, they don't say more than what they need, unless they are bad at making their thoughts clear, or they're scatterbrained, or they ramble.

[quote]
People generally talk in sentence fragments, and if you look at her vocabulary pre-infestation in the Rebel Yell campaign, it's mightily incongruous with her vocabulary post-infestation. Just look at some of Hemingway's dialogue. Holy hell, there's broken English. It isn't uncommon to see an entire question posed as a single word, and not just someone asking for clarification either, like "what?"

It isn't uncommon in the real world and in good dialogue for someone to, for example, ask if someone would like a martini simply by holding up a glass and saying, "Martini?" Only in formal settings would you generally expect someone to say, "Would you like a martini?"

Believe it or not, complex sentences are actually pretty damned rare in normal speech, even for educated people, simply because we aren't conditioned to talk that way.


03/20/2013 12:06 AMPosted by Mora
I'd say that day to day informal speech habits have little to do with alien races.


Methods of human communication don't really have much to do with alien races. It's highly unlikely an alien race would be able to properly communicate with a human, at least not without first going through a great deal of anthropological and linguistic study.

Not much to do with the highest echelons of Terrans, either. They tend to pay extreme attention to the way that they present themselves to the world and have a persona they hold themselves to. Comfortable or "efficient" speech becomes irrelevant. It's just another case of sacrificing comfort for style.


See, that's where we disagree. High echelons of power prize effectiveness in their people. Sure, they like form and style as well, if said form and style looks effective. Besides, Kerrigan only started talking like that after infestation, and it doesn't stand to reason that an alien way of thought, or even alien influence on thought, would cause someone to talk like that, because alien thought and language would be too different for that to be a thing. It's simply more effective to be less verbose. I believe it was Oscar Wilde who said, "Brevity is the soul of wit." I'm probably wrong about that source but whatever. If a military officer asks you to give a report, they don't want you to regail them with your flowery language, they want you to get to point and get out of their hair.

In fact, there is a bit of colloquial slang in the writing community, "purple prose." It's language that is overly flowery and descriptive to the point of cheesiness and ridiculousness. When you have purple dialogue, you get characters that sound like what Kerrigan did in that block I quoted where I said it didn't sound like real speech.
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03/20/2013 05:23 AMPosted by Malcador


... I'm not saying you're wrong to feel the way you do about this game, but damn, people do not talk like that. That sounds far too archaic and stilted for it to be real.


Just an aside, but what's archaic about any of that ? Seems like pretty common language when one is speaking formally. She's speaking as if to a superior, or so it feels like to me, so being formal is pretty natural.


Some of the nouns, but mostly the patterns in syntax and diction.

Vigil isn't something someone says anymore in that context. Totality is a word that I haven't seen outside of fantasy settings or academic papers in a long time, and in most academic settings that it appears in, I've noted that more effective language could be used.

"I have been unable to access the totality of my latent powers, and as such, I would like to infiltrate a Terran science vessel and uncover the secrets of their abandoned Ghost projects."

The middle of this sentence is really weird. It would have been much less effort for her to say "so" or "therefore" instead of, "and as such. It isn't quite a grammar mistake, but it is certainly unnecessary and awkward. This is actually the kind of thing I see a lot of the time when new writers try to simulate archaic language, word choice that leads to awkward or stilted language.
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Follow me here.

What irritates me the most, the MOST about Heart of the Swarm is the terrible realization that I've played this campaign before - when I played Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos as the Orcs.
Follow me here.
Unfairly maligned hero (Thrall/Kerrigan) of a race previously characterized as unredeemable mass murderers (Orcs/Zerg) awakens to premonitions of destruction. Then, he/she escapes from humans who unfairly want him/her dead, and realizes his/her army (Horde/Swarm) has been shattered by the humans. It's time to put the band back together and reassume the mantle of leader (Warchief/Queen). Our hero is told by a mystic outcast (Medivh/Zeratul) to go on a long journey into the unknown (across the sea/into unexplored space). There, our hero goes on a quest to purge the dark influence (demonic corruption/Amon's space demonic corruption) and makes a pilgrimage into this savage land (Kalimdor/Zerus) to rediscover his/her people's noble savage heritage stolen from them by a fallen dark god (Sargeras/Amon). The mystic outcast (Zeratul/Medivh) warns our hero that the ancient evil is returning and he/she is the critical actor that will put an end to this tide of darkness. A setup is put for, in another campaign, a possible Spider-Man/Venom teamup with an ancient and powerful race of mystic warriors that a lancer for our hero (Grom/the parasite queen) literally just unfairly massacred the hell out of (Protoss/Night Elves) in the next expansion.

I already paid money to play this campaign years ago and it came with three other campaigns then. Furthermore, it feels just... AWKWARD seeing Starcraft characters being shoehorned into these roles. It felt like what I was seeing was watching a stage Shakespeare play being set in '30s gangland New York or something as a 'fresh take', except it's not fresh. Do a play about gangland New York. And do a Starcraft story, not a Warcraft one.

Also:
- Raynor/Kerrigan love story. Eh, I could let it slide in Wings, but here... to recap the love story from SC1: Raynor meets Kerrigan in the field, has dirty thoughts about her, Kerrigan calls him out on it for comic relief. They shoot things together for a bit and Kerrigan tells Raynor to not worry about her because she's a Ghost assassin who's walking kickass and doesn't need a rescue (until Mengsk doublecrosses her). That's it. There was no love story. Again, I could let it slide in Wings. This was just... Twilight bad.
- The thought never even crosses Kerrigan's mind that Mengsk is lying about Raynor being dead. Kerrigan, who in Brood War was so devious and intelligent as to completely puppeteer the entire Koprulu sector, doesn't think for a moment that Mengsk, who literally built his career on lies, flim flam and deceit, might be full of crap.
- Kerrigan is over-the-top unlikeable. Just as a person. She literally Force Chokes people in fits of temper tantrums because she didn't like the news she was being brought. She kills Warfield for the crime of being right. The problem isn't that she's unlikeable - in fact, go replay Brood War. I just did to make sure I wasn't looking with rose-tinted glasses. She was Bond Villain unlikeable there, too. She was literally Space Hitler. The problem is, in terms of the narrative, you can't have an unlikeable antihero. Having her spare evac'ing troops and civilians being her only redeeming quality doesn't work.
- Having Kerrigan not remember being the Queen of Blades really flies in the face of Brood War's narrative that Kerrigan was already acting on her own again and had simply become drunk with power. I think that's what people mean when they say "intrigue" was a driver behind SC1's plot; the recurring theme of absolute power corrupting absolutely was a bit more political than Space Magic. What made the Protoss stand out, in fact, and what made them seem inscrutable, was the fact that with their tech they could have enslaved the galaxy and didn't do so because they just didn't want to.
- Also, Kerrigan is still doing clearly awful nonsense! Oh, Protoss colony world. Not gonna just grab the hive here and go somewhere else, I'm just gonna kill every colonist. That's how I solve problems, with indiscriminate violence, but I'm a Good Guy now!
- Matt Horner and Prince Valerian are the best part of this campaign because, as previously mentioned, Starcraft I was less about individuals and more about the course of a race and a struggle and heroes of a faction being major players of a faction's goals rather than the driving force.
- I MUST AVENGE MYSELF ON MENGSK FOR TURNING ME INTO THE QUEEN OF BLADES... BY BECOMING THE QUEEN OF BLADES wat
- It's really anti-feminist to assume that the best way to make a female lead likeable is with a romance. And THAT is a whole different rant.
- Also, Narud/Duran. Bugged me in Wings of Liberty, bugs me here. Whatever, Dr. Alucard.

TLDR: This sucked.

There's more but I'm out of characters.

Also: ESSENCE ESSENCE ESSENCE
Edited by AugustDrake on 3/21/2013 11:37 AM PDT
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Also: Here's a question for you. Who is the villain of Brood War?
Answer: Whoever is on top at the moment.
First, it's the remnant of the Overmind's swarm. Everyone is basically reacting to the Zerg. Then, with the Swarm on the ropes, the UED is the villain. Everyone in the Koprulu sector unites to fight the UED. Then, Kerrigan makes her play to be the dominant power, and cripples every other faction then withdraws to avoid prolonged conflict.

Contrast to here: Everyone starts acting because of a Prophecy. The only clear villain is Mengsk and apart from personal grudges, the only clear reason why he's a villain is Raynor's political revolution (which is a very good reason). But really, he's a Prophecy bit player.
When you have a prophecy, you've basically removed agency from your actors because they will act to fulfill the prophecy. Rather than the story being about how these factions interact with each other, it's now about how they interact with the prophecy.

Furthermore, where can you go with this sort of story? Making the Zerg - you know, the race of living bioweapons - into a "relatable" faction with an essentially invincible leader basically means that either Kerrigan dies in the upcoming expansion, or she lives and will essentially live forever and will either "go Protoss" and just be uninterested in conquest or will start invading worlds out of sheer boredom. Unless, of course, things go World of Warcraft and there's always some other eldritch horror just around the bend. This franchise got written into a corner here.
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"Fellow Terrans, I come to you in the wake or recent events to issue a call to reason. Let no human deny the perils of our time. While we battle one another, divided by the petty strife of our common history, the tide of a greater conflict is turning against us, threatening to destroy ALL that we have accomplished.

It is time for us as nations and as individuals to set aside our long standing feuds, and UNITE. The tides of an un-winnable war are upon us, and we must seek refuge upon higher ground, lest we be swept away by the flood.

The confederacy is no more. Whatever semblance of unity and protection it once provided is a phantom, a memory. With our enemies left unchecked, WHO will you turn to for protection.

The devastation brought by the alien invaders is self evident. We have seen our homes destroyed by the calculated blows of the protoss. We have seen firsthand our friends and loved ones consumed by the nightmary zerg. Unprecedented, and unimaginable though they may be ... these are the signs of our time.

The time has come my fellow terrans to rally to a new banner. In unity lies strength. Already many of the dissident factions have joined us. And out of the many, we shall forge and indivisible whole, capitulating ONLY to a single throne. And from that throne, I shall watch over you.

From this day forward, let no human make war upon any other human, let no terran agency conspire against this new beginning, and let no man consort with alien powers. And to ALL the enemies of humanity: Seek not to bar our way, for we shall win through, no matter the cost. "

Doesn't that speech from SC1 still send tingles down your spine? Does that come even close to anything in starcraft 2?

If this speech was written in starcraft 2, it would be something like this.
Terrans, the zerg and protoss are attacking us. Submit to my rule and I will protect your lives and freedoms. Mengsk out.
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"Fellow Terrans, I come to you in the wake or recent events to issue a call to reason. Let no human deny the perils of our time. While we battle one another, divided by the petty strife of our common history, the tide of a greater conflict is turning against us, threatening to destroy ALL that we have accomplished.

It is time for us as nations and as individuals to set aside our long standing feuds, and UNITE. The tides of an un-winnable war are upon us, and we must seek refuge upon higher ground, lest we be swept away by the flood.

The confederacy is no more. Whatever semblance of unity and protection it once provided is a phantom, a memory. With our enemies left unchecked, WHO will you turn to for protection.

The devastation brought by the alien invaders is self evident. We have seen our homes destroyed by the calculated blows of the protoss. We have seen firsthand our friends and loved ones consumed by the nightmary zerg. Unprecedented, and unimaginable though they may be ... these are the signs of our time.

The time has come my fellow terrans to rally to a new banner. In unity lies strength. Already many of the dissident factions have joined us. And out of the many, we shall forge and indivisible whole, capitulating ONLY to a single throne. And from that throne, I shall watch over you.

From this day forward, let no human make war upon any other human, let no terran agency conspire against this new beginning, and let no man consort with alien powers. And to ALL the enemies of humanity: Seek not to bar our way, for we shall win through, no matter the cost. "

Doesn't that speech from SC1 still send tingles down your spine? Does that come even close to anything in starcraft 2?


My feelings on that speech are pretty much the same as they've always been. So much useless and empty words that don't really say anything, typical of dictator-speech. The only thing I originally felt at that speech that I no longer feel, is anger that Mengsk gets to live.
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