Real-life ground/air unit transformers

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http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/TTO/Programs/Transformer_(TX).aspx
Having soldiers simply drive to where they need to go is no longer enough for the United States.
To give them the ability to quickly fly past mine-ridden areas, traffic or garbage filled streets, or rough terrain, the military is working on making a HUMVEE replacement that can fly OR drive (the latter probably for efficiency, slow patrols, and quite entrances). Yes, it seems that the first flying cars available to the average man will likely be based off of the results of this research and development project.

The first concept art is based off of a combination of the V-22 Osprey and a 4-person car.
The Osprey: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell_Boeing_V-22_Osprey
The Osprey folds, similar to the concept art:
http://www.shephardmedia.com/static/images/article/MV-22_Japan_Folded_USMC.jpg

The second concept seems to be a type of autogyro, or it could be a gyrodyne.
Autogyro: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autogyro
Gyrodyne: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyrodyne

An example of a autogyro/car hybrid: http://pal-v.com/the-pal-v-one/technology/
A program to develop an improved type of gyrodyne: http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/TTO/Programs/DiscRotor_Compound_Helicopter.aspx
Edited by Engineer on 4/15/2013 6:06 PM PDT
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Bump. (if only to try and bury that stupid scam thread)
Edited by Engineer on 4/14/2013 4:56 PM PDT
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wow never knew these were even made
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Additional Information & Images

AAI's TX (below) is a 7,500lb vehicle with an unpowered rotor for VTOL, a fold-out wing for cruise and a ducted fan for propulsion. A single 1,200shp Honeywell HTS900 turboshaft generates power to drive the four electric wheel motors, spins up the rotor for a "jump" take-off and drives the 56in-diameter ducted fan in forward flight. Ground speed is up to 80mph; flight speed range is 50-155kt; maximum altitude is 10,000ft.

Using Cartercopter's slowed rotor/compound technology, AAI's TX is essentially an autogyro with wings. In forward flight, lift transfers to the wing and the 50ft-diameter rotor slows until it is rotating solely to provide stability. Compared with a conventional helicopter, this reduces rotor drag. Retractable suspension pulls the wheels up into their wells to further reduce drag in flight. To land, the vehicle autorotates, the high-inertia, tip-weighed blades storing enough energy to enable a "zero-roll" touchdown.

http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com/media/2010/08/100831-flyinghummer-03.jpg
https://www.dupontregistry.com/autos/blog/image.axd?picture=2010%2F12%2Ftransformer-tx-military-vehicle-3.jpg
http://www.popsci.com/files/imagecache/article_image_large/articles/IMG_1454.jpeg

Lockheed Martin's TX (below) is a 7,000lb vehicle with ducted fans that tilt from horizontal for VTOL and to vertical for forward flight. The 8.5ft outside-diameter fans are attached to a lifting-body center wing section mounted above the vehicle. This houses a pair of turboshaft engines that drive the fans and has a trailing-edge flap to increase lift at low speed. Flight speed is up to 130kt.

To convert from fly to drive, the outer panels of the 41.5ft-span wing fold inwards against the ducts and the complete wing/fan assembly rotates to lie along the length of the vehicle. A Pratt & Whitney EnduroCore heavy-fuel dual rotary engine then powers the four electric wheel motors. DARPA is aiming for a range - on the ground or in the air - of 250 miles on a tank of gas.

http://www.darpa.mil/uploadedImages/Content/Our_Work/TTO/Programs/Transformer/TX_Lockheed_Martin.jpg
http://sitelife.aviationweek.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/14/9/0eb46c99-2c3c-4573-89f3-6a1326d1cec2.Full.jpg
http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSPNs3avP2vZKInYUGm2JNDuB-_crc-iJsD9u9TMgdwt7SzNfKw
http://www.macroindustries.com/website/files/images/DARPA%20Flying%20Hummer.png

Three main contractors are working on the flying Humvee: Rocketdyne, Lockheed Martin and AAI Corp. Rocketdyne will create the engines and already makes jet and transport plane engines for the Airforce. Lockheed Martin is the largest defense contractor in the country. The main design comes from AAI.
Right now, designs are in the first phases. AAI has a $3 million contract from DARPA to cover feasibility studies, wing studies, propulsion, materials and flight controls. The first prototypes aren't expected until 2013 -- and those prototypes are expected to be partial prototypes. The full development phase is expected to cost $9 million. That's a pretty steep total for just the first phase of the project, which is has a total budget of $40 million.
DARPA aiming for around $1 million a copy compared with $400,000 for a Humvee and $4 million for light helicopter.
From Wikipedia: An AH-64 Apache helicopter costs around $18 million, a V-22 Osprey tiltrotor around $70 million, and a F-35B Lighting II STOVL jet $238 million

Concepts that appear to have not made it into development:
http://media.al.com/huntsville-times-business/photo/macrowheelsjpg-00deae7a44199750_large.jpg
http://media.al.com/huntsville-times-business/photo/macroflyingjpg-906d20ffbfcbf026_large.jpg
http://i3.ytimg.com/vi/bv4XaUu-Cc8/hqdefault.jpg

http://www.thedetroitbureau.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/AVX-Transformer-TX-concept.jpg
http://www.tuvie.com/wp-content/uploads/avx-aircraft-4x4-tx1.jpg

http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSV-KAlqL2mmXubVI3Y5613o_-bwkf1fa7a1C3qtWL_ZHzDLa45
http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ0iq_i95uN1XFNX_khd7c3PpzzWRDLV8y-STS_QPT_X81EGYkB

**NOTE: THE FOLLOWING IS NOT PART OF DARPA'S PROJECT**, although it is a flying car concept in development which has proposed military purposes.

The Urban Aeronautics X-Hawk is primarily a troop carrier that can transport small fighting units in areas where the use of helicopters is impractical or impossible. Unlike ground transport in urban environments, X-Hawk is unaffected by IED’s and other potentially lethal threats and can deliver troops to any location with great precision including the capability to deliver them directly into a building at any level through a window. This avoids the use of potentially perilous stairwells.

http://www.urbanaero.com/userfiles/images/x-hawk_c_military.jpg
Edited by Engineer on 4/18/2013 11:53 AM PDT
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Erm I think you all late on the news of budget cuts and how impractical those things are.

Good idea though.
Edited by AgCl on 6/9/2013 3:29 PM PDT
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Silver Chloride your back to this part of the forums, this is wonderful news. and your post sums up everything i wanted to say.
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A company called Terrafugia is planning on having street-legal flying cars available for purchase in a few years. They already have a much more limited and more expensive version on the market now.

http://www.terrafugia.com/tfx-vision

The technology is all there, so there's nothing really stopping it from becoming a reality except the economics of it.
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Silver Chloride your back to this part of the forums, this is wonderful news. and your post sums up everything i wanted to say.

Wow! Thank you!

Here is the article I read about quite a white ago.
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/10/darpa-flying-humvee-designs/
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Erm I think you all late on the news of budget cuts and how impractical those things are.

Good idea though.

No offense, but to me, this seems contradictory, a good idea is practical, a bad idea is not, UNLESS you just mean that it's not practical yet, as in they need, say, lighter, stronger materials, better active defense systems, or something else.
I never really thought it was an amazing idea; impressive, no doubt, but when I first saw the page on DARPA's website, I lol'd for 5 minutes.
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06/17/2013 10:18 PMPosted by Engineer
UNLESS you just mean that it's not practical yet, as in they need, say, lighter, stronger materials, better active defense systems, or something else.


Yes! You read the wired article? An important aspect of the DARPA specification is fuel consumption, which makes this idea very unpractical with current technologies. DARPA was really wishing for a troop transport that replace the dated HUMVEEs without additional fuel and maintenance cost and more durability against IEDs. The current "meta' Is to have V-shaped hulls, higher clearance and more armor for transport (strykers, Rosomak etc.) However those armored vehicle are not as fuel efficient due to the added armor and very prone to flips.
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