"Control your pet". What must I do?

So I'm trying to be slightly less than a complete huntard. I usually do very well in dungeons I join damage wise, but one thing I'm constantly told is "Control your pet". I tend to keep it on defensive, which means I'm not just randomly aggroing extra packs or anything. I try to ask what the issue is and people just call me a huntard/noob.

I suppose I can leave it on passive and manually control it, but not knowing the exact issue I'm not sure what that would change.

Am I just grouping with crazies or is there something specific I'm supposed to be doing?
Edited by Daizir on 11/28/2010 5:48 AM PST
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85 Blood Elf Hunter
10655
Keep on passive.
As you are shooting, get into the habit of hitting ctrl+1, or create a pet attack macro to send him in whenever you shoot. He will return to you when the mob dies.
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80 Orc Hunter
6680
While leveling, there is sometimes a tendency to leave growl on when you enter a dungeon.
This can cause many issues especially with a low level tank or someone tanking in a dps spec.

Growl can actually cause more issues than a defensive pet.

There is nothing wrong with using defensive as long as you understand the full mechanics of it and how to control your pet while in combat.

In defensive mode, your pet only attacks under 3 circumstances.

The first and most common is your pet will attack your target as soon as you open fire.
Note however that if you switch targets, your pet will not.
Keep this in mind if you are ever asked to switch targets. Simply click the pet attack button, and your pet will switch to your current target.

The second is that if an enemy strikes you and your pet is currently not attacking another target, then your pet will attack the enemy that attacked you.
If you "face pull" and find your pet chewing on it's leg and causing it not to move, especially if the tank is busy, simply put your pet on passive then move to the tank, pulling that enemy to the tank so he can pick it up.

The third is if you manually click pet attack while targeting an enemy.

With a combination of situational awareness and understanding those lil mechanics, you should rarely have any complaints.

As a new hunter, yea, it takes some learning, and it's good of you to ask for help. IMO that's far from a huntard. A huntard would just refuse to learn how to improve and blame their mistakes on someone else.


















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85 Night Elf Hunter
5545
So I'm trying to be slightly less than a complete huntard. I usually do very well in dungeons I join damage wise, but one thing I'm constantly told is "Control your pet". I tend to keep it on defensive, which means I'm not just randomly aggroing extra packs or anything. I try to ask what the issue is and people just call me a huntard/noob.

I suppose I can leave it on passive and manually control it, but not knowing the exact issue I'm not sure what that would change.

Am I just grouping with crazies or is there something specific I'm supposed to be doing?


Are you by any chance using a fox or a bear? There might be other pets, but these have known issues and it has affected me as well (although only while exploring and preventing me from mounting).

These pets have a "demoralizing shout"-like ability that affects all targets within 100 yards. Consequently, this puts everything attackable that is within 100 yards of your pet on your pets aggro table, including those cute, cuddly critters. Thus, once your group is done with the current set of mobs, your pet still has aggro on something else and tries to chase it down (even when it's set to defensive, because the critter is on the aggro table).

This could be the cause of your problems. If this is the case, turn off the pet's special ability (so that you can continue to level it) or switch to another pet.
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85 Orc Hunter
880
1) WOTLK allowed us to get lazy and put our pets on Defensive, but the proper stance is PASSIVE. Why? Sometimes sending in the pet is a bad idea, because the pet will always position itself behind the mob it is attacking and that can put it too close to a nearby group, and pull that group, causing a wipe.

2) Be absolutely sure your pet has any special threat attacks turned off. Growl is of course number one. In the past, multi-target attacks were a bad thing on pets, but that's supposed to be fixed, and I've not had any problems with multi-target attacks on my pets but pay attention, that doesn't mean it can't happen. Pay attention to ranged attacks - again, usually not a problem these days, but KNOW it isn't a problem, don't just guess about it.

Tenacity pets come with more options for threat. No particular pet has more threat abilities than other pets at this time. If you are using a Tenacity pet you must turn off it's extra threat attacks, Thunderstomp and Taunt, if you bought them in the Talent tree.

PAY attention to your threat meter and make sure your pet isn't exceeding the tank's threat.

(To keep an ability turned off, right-click it. Make sure the swirly pattern on the button stops, or you didn't turn it off. If it's a feature that's already active, such as Prowl might be making your Cat less visible, you'll need to left-click on it to stop it and right-click it to keep it off. If the ability isn't on the pet bar then go in to the spellbook and change it there, it still functions whether it's on the bar or not.)

3) This is VERY important for all Hunters to know - hunters are "the class to blame". Tanks blame Hunters for their mistakes. Other DPS blame Hunters for their mistakes. I hate the "Huntard" label for a variety of reasons - first, "retarded" is a medical or educational diagnosis and there's no shame in being diagnosed retarded, any more than a doctor telling you that you have diabetes or a broken leg, and I have no respect for anyone who makes fun of any class of people that way. Putting down people by using "retarded" as a pejorative is putting down the retarded people themselves, and it is as wrong as any other kind of prejudice. Second is - Hunters aren't any less than any other class, for any reason. It's an excellent and useful class, and the players who play it are as varied as any other, and can be as talented as any other. The label may be a joke, but there is an undercurrent of belief attached to it - and that is prejudice. Too many people think they have a right to blame Hunters and that Hunters really are inferior. Too many people will use the mere fact that a Hunter is in their group to avoid taking responsibility for their own shortcomings.

Now that I've had my say about that, the point is, be aware that you are going to get blamed for things that aren't your fault. There are a lot of ignorant players in WoW (ignorant means "doesn't know") - there's nothing to be ashamed of if you don't know something, but many of these people pretend they do or think they do, or still believe something that hasn't been true in the game for years. Be aware. Now, don't go too far and become one of those people yourselves, thinking all the time "Well, they're just blaming me because I'm a Hunter" without thinking it through; you still have to be willing to pay attention to what you do if you want to get better.

The best way to be a good Hunter is the same as any class: Know your class. Consult the "expert" sites and glean what you can. but the best is to watch and learn and practice yourself. See what your pets do. Spreadsheet programs and sim programs and mathematics can tell you a lot, but none of them can tell you why the tank thinks your pet is a problem - and you can't tell the tank he/she is wrong in an intelligent way if you don't know why the tank is wrong.

;)
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100 Night Elf Hunter
9880
1. Make sure you turn off Growl.

2. Dismiss him if your group is jumping down.

3. Turn off it's aoe debuff if there are critters around.

4. uh..... what else?


5. If people are still complaining, MD the next boss to the healer and leave the raid.
5 also works if you're bored.
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90 Night Elf Priest
7310
If you are using assist, be aware that for some reason when using it my pet runs off and aggros a new group every now and then, which is bad.

Tab targeting can do the same thing, but in that case it is clearly player error.

I have learned click targeting is slower but safer.

Defensive is ok with a good tank that is pulling big groups. In tight quarters, though, passive gives you time and choices.
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85 Goblin Hunter
2925
Control your pet is usually said to you when your pet is giving your friends attitude and you are standing around not saying anything.

Usually at that point you have two options:
1. Tell your pet to shut up and threaten it with violence if it keeps going.
2. Lose your manhood and say nothing OR EVEN WORSE agree with your pet.

Putting your pet on passive may avoid these situations, as would turning growl off.
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Pets have been a little more erratic in my observations post 4.0. If you don't want to manually send your pet in every time you attack, try out this macro.

#showtooltip Arcane Shot
/cast Arcane Shot
/petattack

Essentially, you can macro the "/petattack" function onto any shot: steady, serpent sting, mark, etc. You could even macro it to all of your shots to ensure complete control during combat.

This will make your pet attack whatever you shoot the macro'd shot at, and ensure your pet is always on your target. This should work fine in dungeons as well as battlegrounds, and allow you to safely keep your pet on PASSIVE while avoiding the necessity of using a separate keybind to send your pet in.
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1) WOTLK allowed us to get lazy and put our pets on Defensive, but the proper stance is PASSIVE. Why? Sometimes sending in the pet is a bad idea, because the pet will always position itself behind the mob it is attacking and that can put it too close to a nearby group, and pull that group, causing a wipe.


Well, you should anyway wait with attacking till the tank has positioned the mobs and it is the tank's job to get enough space behind the mob for pets. Still, passive can avoid some nasty surprises when you hit the wrong button at the wrong time. (Especially with the new annoying "attack the nearest mob if you don't have a valid target" behavior.)

Most of the time, complains about pets come from three behaviors:

1) Geography: This occurs most often when you jump somewhere: your pet will not jump and instead walk, potentially aggroing a lot of mobs. This can also happen in places where it surprises you, sometimes the pet decides that it cannot walk over a little step and takes a different way. Dismiss the pet before jumping and keep an eye on it every time you walk over a "step".

2) Running after fleeing mobs. Almost dead mobs run away, your pet follows them and aggros new mobs. (Although people might complain just because it runs after them, even if it doesn't aggro new mobs.) When you are attacking your pet's mob, you should just kill it with Killshot (+ Arcane, if needed) before the mob is too far. But if you are busy tab-targetting other mobs (e.g. for Serpent Sting), you might not notice it running after them.

3) Growl (and other specials that generate aggro) should be turned off.

And finally, everyone that complains about you without explaining on request how you can become a better player should get on your ignore list. And if you feel particularly annoyed, you might even send the discussion to their guild leader. (But only do that for respected guilds, if the guild leader is also twelve years old, they might just laugh at you.)
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87 Troll Hunter
MHC
10225
Pets have been a little more erratic in my observations post 4.0. If you don't want to manually send your pet in every time you attack, try out this macro.

#showtooltip Arcane Shot
/cast Arcane Shot
/petattack

Essentially, you can macro the "/petattack" function onto any shot: steady, serpent sting, mark, etc. You could even macro it to all of your shots to ensure complete control during combat.

This will make your pet attack whatever you shoot the macro'd shot at, and ensure your pet is always on your target. This should work fine in dungeons as well as battlegrounds, and allow you to safely keep your pet on PASSIVE while avoiding the necessity of using a separate keybind to send your pet in.


Will this interrupt channeling pets?
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49 Human Hunter
450

Bigfat's got it. I macro /petattack with hunter's mark. I'm not into sending my pet after a secondary target unless told to do so. So the target marked is where my pet will be and it stops that silly run back after the target drops, I just put hunter's mark on the next target.
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90 Night Elf Hunter
7765
Make sure you have an easy means to pull you pet
back from a target and/or switch it to passive. For me I have pet attack, pet passive and pet defensive bound to easily reachable keys. What works for you works for you, but you have to be able to call you pet back if/when you see it running off. Hitting passive will basically call your pet back to your side, and you have to be able to do this quickly and easily.

Another thing to keep in mind is that pets default to attacking the back of the target. This can sometimes lead to interesting situations, so it is good to remember. If you don't want your pet behind the target don't send it in.
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85 Troll Hunter
9755
I leave my pet on defensive most of the time. If I need to control it, I have a macro to put it on passive, and another to put it on defensive and attack the target.
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