AT&T Introducing Traffic (Data) Limits

100 Undead Mage
11895
As I am bored at work, I thought this would be interesting/unfortunate news to anyone else on AT&T.

According to DSLReports, AT&T, the popular American communications network, will introduce traffic restrictions to all of its DSL customers on May 2, including those on the company's U-Verse package. Standard users will receive an allowance of 150GB per month, with U-Verse users being given an extra hundred gigabytes to bring the total up to 250GB. Starting from the 18th of this month customers will start to receive letters informing them of the changes to their contracts.

Seth Bloom, an AT&T spokesperson, has confirmed the rumour and added that users will be subject to overage charges if they exceed their caps, however only the ones who repeatedly ignore this limit will be penalised. The newly-formed charges will be an extra $10 per 50GB of data used over their agreed cap, meaning that if a customer uses a total of 500GB of bandwidth per month on a standard tariff they may be billed an additional $70.

The company claim the average user only uses around 18GB of data in total per month, which to many may seem a very low figure, and only two percent of customers exceed this. "Using a notification structure similar to our new wireless data plans, we'll proactively notify customers when they exceed 65%, 90% and 100% of the monthly usage allowance," said Seth Bloom.


Not sure where AT&T gets their information from.
I plow through 150GBs a month with impunity, between NetFlix, online streams, random downloads, streaming pr0n, game demos, streaming/downloading music, XBox Live Games, illegal torrents, and more streaming of the pr0n, I easily pass that mark. Ever since I just got my 1TB hard drive, about two weeks ago, I have used around 200GB.

This makes about as much sense as paying for premium cable or the like, but them limiting you on how many hours you can watch a month, on all lines in the household.
Unfortunate news for me, oh well I guess all you can do is cut back on usage.

EDIT: Also, we pay for the, I think, 18Mbps service (considering it is also used as our business line), which sucks even more, because with higher speeds such as this, and paying premium, you would think you would get a higher cap, because of the service, it just makes more sense.
Edited by Roija on 3/14/2011 8:01 AM PDT
Reply Quote
80 Undead Warlock
5810
http://www.savetheinternet.com/frequently-asked-questions?gclid=CMTUgd2nzqcCFYTr7QoddX2vlQ

Get informed! <3
Reply Quote
100 Undead Mage
11895
http://www.savetheinternet.com/frequently-asked-questions?gclid=CMTUgd2nzqcCFYTr7QoddX2vlQ

Get informed! <3


That'll give me something to read, thank ya.
Reply Quote
85 Tauren Druid
10615
When I moved to Alaska and found that I'd have to choose between an astronomical cable bill or a bandwidth limit, I was disappointed. I decided to give the 50GB package a chance. I watch a *%!*load of movies and TV shows on Netflix and obviously spend a lot of time playing online games. I also watch a great deal of videos on Youtube. I've never hit my bandwidth limit.

I'd bet that if you quit the "illegal torrents" part of your bandwidth usage, you'd be fine too.
Reply Quote
80 Undead Warlock
5810
Bluebell (Now Twilightsparkle) is much better informed on net neutrality than anyone else I know. She frequently rouses us all to send in emails and keeps us partially informed (at least of the major happenings) on a regular basis. If you have any questions about it or find it difficult to understand, head over and make a post on the thread.

http://www.epitome-guild.com/showthread.php?2378-Hello-again-US-Citizens!&highlight=neutrality
Reply Quote
100 Undead Mage
11895
Probably so.
Majority of the bigger downloads are XBL Demos/Full Games, Discographies, and PC Games. I can live without them, of course, I doubt I'll actually ever get around to finishing DA:O.
I know that the 150GB cap is a lot bigger then some places get, ie. NZ gets I think 20GB caps, which is really low, and Aussie I think 60GB cap.
So, 150GB is considerably high.

By far the biggest files though, are the business ones, the upload/download of our cameras to servers, as they are raw uncompressed video. It is mainly going to be watching what I do on my off time, and not exceeding the limit because these files are of course, more important. I need to actually find out how much these take, I know it is a lot, and why we pay for premium service, those alone probably take up atleast 50GB a month, the files are pretty big.
Edited by Roija on 3/14/2011 9:20 AM PDT
Reply Quote
100 Undead Mage
11895
My main concern of the article, and all bandwidth caps, would be how the world is, quickly, moving everything onto the internet, what with cloud-based applications, businesses, services like NetFlix, etc..
Especially with FiberOptic lines coming through as well. I don't see it being /to/ much longer before a lot of bandwidth is being passed by the average user daily.

I just hope all companies will make fair accommodations when this is the norm.
Reply Quote
90 Blood Elf Priest
10365
http://www.savetheinternet.com/frequently-asked-questions?gclid=CMTUgd2nzqcCFYTr7QoddX2vlQ

Get informed! <3

This. This. A million times, this.

If you think this isn't "that bad," keep in mind that it's just getting the snowball rolling. The FCC only passed very anemic Net Neutrality laws and even those are already being fought.

http://www.savetheinternet.com/blog/11/03/10/house-goes-nuts-over-net-neutrality

Right now it's important to contact your Senators and savetheinternet makes it super simple. Just click their link, fill out your contact info and the message is already written. If you can follow up with a phone call (they also usually give you on the site or send you an email with the numbers of your elected officials and a speech to leave as a message for them... it doesn't get easier than this to get involved) or donate a few dollars, even better.

It's also really easy to post to your Facebook, so please spread the word as well. I'd suggest signing up for their newsletter also. You'll usually hear from them a few times a week and it's not always about Net Neutrality, but they aren't obnoxious in the least.

Even my (now formerly) beloved Google has been up to no good. Last summer when mails were going out about their pact with Verizon, I happened to notice this in my spam filter.

Some people are reporting that my last e-mail, asking you to urge FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski to denounce Google and Verizon's evil pact and protect the open Internet, got caught in Google's Gmail spam filters. Fishy.


Sure enough, there were several other mails from savetheinternet about Google and Verizon sitting in my spam folder. I'm not sure my jaw has entirely come up off the floor after that one, even more than six months later.

I'm generally quite the pessimist, but if they don't want us seeing these mails, then I have to believe that we're capable of making a difference. Please take a few minutes to get involved. :(
Reply Quote
85 Tauren Druid
10615
Gmail uses bayesian statistics to filter spam. Every time you mark an email as spam you are contributing to the pool of knowledge that is used to determine if an email is spam or not.

Google doesn't choose what is or is not spam. The users do.

Moving on, I do agree that net neutrality is an important issue and every serious internet user should be keeping a watchful eye on it. As our world moves towards a future where everything we do is "online", the people who run things will increasingly seek to regulate and milk it (and you) for all they can.
Reply Quote
90 Blood Elf Priest
10365
I've received mails from savetheinternet since 2006. Never once did they hit my spam filter until after the initial mail regarding Google and Verizon went out (2010). The follow up mails went straight to spam. They've never gone to spam again since. I'm not big on conspiracy theories, so I'm not unwilling to believe that Google had no knowing hand in it, but I do find it to be as the email described... Fishy. It's a fairly big coincidence for me to swallow without issue, especially considering the exorbitant amount of money involved.
Reply Quote
85 Goblin Mage
2330
Is this going to effect how much we play at all? im gonna be pissed if we have to constantly watch our gaming time.
Reply Quote
80 Undead Mage
3575
The short answer is no.

The longer answer is, it really depends on how much you game, how much else you do on the Internet, and what the "final" cap will be. Just watch the situation more closely, and if it draws towards 20G for a cap, there may be problems. At 150G or whatever is proposed, it is not an issue.
Reply Quote

Please report any Code of Conduct violations, including:

Threats of violence. We take these seriously and will alert the proper authorities.

Posts containing personal information about other players. This includes physical addresses, e-mail addresses, phone numbers, and inappropriate photos and/or videos.

Harassing or discriminatory language. This will not be tolerated.

Forums Code of Conduct

Report Post # written by

Reason
Explain (256 characters max)
Submit Cancel

Reported!

[Close]