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90 Blood Elf Rogue
0
09/02/2012 08:54 AMPosted by Phaedra
The Belgariad and The Malloreon by David Eddings

The Malloreon can't hold a candle to The Belgariad. It's sad how you can practically track on a graph how his wife became more involved with his writing, The Elenium and The Tamuli were absolutely atrocious.

I also think she's responsible for Ce'Nedra's schizophrenic characterization in The Magician's Gambit. >_>

The Belgariad is quite good, though. I'm actually in the middle of rereading it again.
Edited by Verelyse on 9/2/2012 9:48 AM PDT
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90 Night Elf Druid
11295
09/02/2012 09:47 AMPosted by Verelyse
The Belgariad and The Malloreon by David Eddings

The Malloreon can't hold a candle to The Belgariad. It's sad how you can practically track on a graph how his wife became more involved with his writing, The Elenium and The Tamuli were absolutely atrocious.

I also think she's responsible for Ce'Nedra's schizophrenic characterization in The Magician's Gambit. >_>

The Belgariad is quite good, though. I'm actually in the middle of rereading it again.


Honestly, it's all Silk (who's one of my favorite characters of all time) and the Emperor in the Malloreon for me.
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87 Night Elf Death Knight
4465
For the life of me, I can't imagine why anyone would enjoy the Malazan books. I have attempted to read 3 of them and give up about 150-200 pages in because nothing ever happens...


oh man... oh man... things never STOP happening in those books. the reason why it's hard for a lot of people to read them is that there is no clear beginning or end. there's no big introduction that lays out the general direction of the story. it's more like erikson held the entire timeline of the malazan universe before himself, and threw a dart at it and said "i'll start here" and then dove right in.

often it seems nothing is happening with the story, because the meat of his writing is all about the interactions of the different people. he's telling their stories through their eyes, and leaving you to infer all the details of the bigger world picture. at least until you get most of the way through book 4. by then, the stage is set. by book 5, more of the main characters and factions are well known to you. and with book 6 it all peaks, and the last 4 books just let it ride...

Adjuct Tavore is the singularly most well written, deepest, most engaging main character i've ever encountered in literature, and you never even get a point of view chapter from her. you can never truly know her, no more than her enemies can, nor her allies. She will give you nothing, yet at the end you will kneel.
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90 Blood Elf Rogue
0
It can be tough getting through Gardens of the Moon though, to be fair. I've read it three times now, and you're really not equipped to fully appreciate it until you're deeper into the series. But I don't think there's anything inherently wrong with that, instant gratification isn't a prerequisite for a fantastic piece of work.

It's still a great book and rewarding in its own way as an introduction to Erikson's world.

Frankly, if I ever write a book I just hope my first one is a fraction as good as Gardens of the Moon.

09/03/2012 12:01 AMPosted by Eithris
Adjuct Tavore is the singularly most well written, deepest, most engaging main character i've ever encountered in literature, and you never even get a point of view chapter from her. you can never truly know her, no more than her enemies can, nor her allies. She will give you nothing, yet at the end you will kneel.

There are so many amazingly unique characters; I think the one that stuck with me the most though was Murillio. In the first few books I just kept getting Princess Bride flashbacks for no apparent reason, but when he finally got some proper attention in Toll the Hounds it hit me as hard as the Chain of Dogs.
Edited by Verelyse on 9/3/2012 8:47 AM PDT
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85 Orc Hunter
5080
The Fifty Shades of Gray trilogy.

/endthread

(is it even a trilogy? if it is, then that's 3 books longer than the series should have been)
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85 Human Paladin
0
The Repairman Jack series will keep you busy for a while. 19 books and counting (24 if you include The Adversary Cycle books, and you won't be able to stop yourself). One of the coolest characters ever created if you enjoy a mixture of hard-knuckle badassery and the paranormal.

http://www.repairmanjack.com/forum/content.php?s=e87c15e2b6c2c32ed2444f0089fd2095&4-published-fiction
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90 Blood Elf Warrior
4680
Kingkiller Chronicles
Prince of Nothing.

Read and thank me later
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90 Night Elf Hunter
8900
I will throw my vote in for a slow reading of The Malazan Book of the Fallen. I am on my second read through and find them all wonderful a second time as well.

I think it requires multiple readings, to be quite honest. So many of the characters are interesting, heart-breaking, sad, terrifying etc that sometimes the tone is hard to grasp the first time around.

Gardens of the Moon might be a little hard to get through, but the series really opens up at Deadhouse Gates. It's probably one of the best books I've ever read and I'm well read in more than just fantasy.

Also a good series is The Prince of Nothing. It is also a little hard to get through in some places, but worth it.

I am probably not going to make myself popular here by saying this but, Kingkiller Chronicles is a pass for me. I read the first book and did not care for the main character at all. He's way too Mary Sue for me.
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90 Gnome Rogue
8175
The Death Gate Cycle.
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90 Human Warlock
3550
The Sigma Series - James Rollins
Anything by Clive Cussler

Cirque du freak, can't remember the author and its extremely easy to read but interesting nonetheless.
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90 Orc Hunter
8475
Just throwing in another vote for 'Prince of Nothing' by R. Scott Bakker. It's really dense, brutal, ugly stuff that's way beyond the 'adopted farmboy of prophecy and plucky princess who wants to wear pants instead of dresses' stuff that takes up a lot of shelves in the fantasy section.
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90 Gnome Mage
3450
I'll toss in another prop for Steven Erikson's Malazan series. Simply put, there is nothing else like it in modern fantasy. NOTHING.

Others I'd strongly recommend are C.S.Friedman's Coldfire trilogy, & also her Magister trilogy.

Another good one is the Fall Of Thanes series, by Brian Ruxley. Book 2 in particular was simply brilliant.

For "popcorn" fiction, there's nothing better than Lincoln & Child, James Rollins, & Steve Berry.
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90 Gnome Mage
3450
If you like science fiction, then I very, very strongly recommend Jack McDevitt.

I can not recommend him strongly enough. In particular, the Academy Series (first book is called The Engines Of God) & the Alex Benedict books (first book is called A Talent For War) are superb.
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90 Worgen Warlock
0
The Kitty Norville Series. I mean whats funnier then a Werewolf named Kitty. fun reading
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