Strongest Metal?

90 Human Warrior
14180
As a real life blacksmith, I often have to consider the properties of the materials I am using. That got me thinking. What is the strongest metal at this point in time? Tungsten or tungsten carbide is the first thing that comes to my mind but I am sure they would have come up with a stronger alloy by now.

Any ideas on what the strongest metal is?
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Chemist here...

And... no idea :(

But diamond is an extended covalent network molecular solid, not a metal :)

OP, might be interested in this thread:
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-hardest-metal.htm
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89 Night Elf Death Knight
3140
I expect something will soon have to be done to make diamond strong carbon nanotube based alloys using metals such as titanium and iron, for example. Only a matter of time.

As is, graphene on its own is the hardest material currently known. I think per weight versus tensile strength the best metal is titanium.
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85 Dwarf Hunter
8525
i dont know what we the people are privy to but the navy materials research people seem to do this sorta thing.. *runs off to google

*shuffles back in.. i dunno

titanium carbide? /shrug

edit - theres not much smiting the titanium though
Edited by Kendamd on 7/2/2012 8:52 PM PDT
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90 Human Warrior
14180
07/02/2012 08:43 PMPosted by Kendamd
theres not much smiting the titanium though


I don't really care if I can blacksmith it I just want to know.
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90 Tauren Shaman
0
Now, I stole this in large part from yahoo answers, so take it with a grain of salt.
And I don't know how up to date the info is, but it's worth looking into.
Yes, various titanium alloys are incredibly strong, but apparently there are stronger, though titanium is lighter:

http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20060606024051AAyKEDB
Titanium is NOT the strongest metal. It is often thought of as the strongest but actually it has one of the highest strength to weight ratios. I.e., for a metal that is so light-weight, it is extremely strong. Typically it has a ultimate tensile strength of up to 170,000 psi. Another unique property is that its strength does not deteriorate in high temperature applications. This makes it ideal for use in aerospace especially engine components.
There are many metals much stronger than this. Two stainless steels that come to mind are 17-4PH and 15-5PH which can achieve Ftu of 180,000 to 200,000 psi through heat treatment.
Inconel 625 which is used in the aerospace industry, typically in the production of high-strength fasteners used in critical joints can achieve ultimate shear strengths of 220,000 psi.
Intermediate alloy steels such as 5Cr-Mo-V has an Ftu of up to 280 ksi. Also low alloy steel such as AISI 4130 used in aircraft landing gear has extremely high bearing strength, tensile and compression strength.
Source(s):
Aircraft metal strength tables and the Mil-Hdbk-5


And of course, tungsten is awesome.
Edited by Nachtstier on 7/4/2012 2:33 AM PDT
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90 Human Warrior
14180
Now, I stole this in large part from yahoo answers, so take it with a grain of salt.
And I don't know how up to date the info is, but it's worth looking into.
Yes, various titanium alloys are incredibly strong, but apparently there are stronger, though titanium is lighter:

http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20060606024051AAyKEDB
Titanium is NOT the strongest metal. It is often thought of as the strongest but actually it has one of the highest strength to weight ratios. I.e., for a metal that is so light-weight, it is extremely strong. Typically it has a ultimate tensile strength of up to 170,000 psi. Another unique property is that its strength does not deteriorate in high temperature applications. This makes it ideal for use in aerospace especially engine components.
There are many metals much stronger than this. Two stainless steels that come to mind are 17-4PH and 15-5PH which can achieve Ftu of 180,000 to 200,000 psi through heat treatment.
Inconel 625 which is used in the aerospace industry, typically in the production of high-strength fasteners used in critical joints can achieve ultimate shear strengths of 220,000 psi.
Intermediate alloy steels such as 5Cr-Mo-V has an Ftu of up to 280 ksi. Also low alloy steel such as AISI 4130 used in aircraft landing gear has extremely high bearing strength, tensile and compression strength.
Source(s):
Aircraft metal strength tables and the Mil-Hdbk-5


And of course, tungsten is awesome.


Thanks for the info.

You'd think that this would be pretty damn easy to look up. I mean something like this should be well known.
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90 Tauren Shaman
0
Also, one has to be careful with hard metals.
Even if a metal is super hard, that also means it is really brittle.
You have to know what you wanna use the metal for, and which of the properties take importance. Properties like the stress and strain coefficients, etc.
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90 Human Warrior
14180
Also, one has to be careful with hard metals.
Even if a metal is super hard, that also means it is really brittle.
You have to know what you wanna use the metal for, and which of the properties take importance. Properties like the stress and strain coefficients, etc.


Yes I know, I'm a blacksmith lol

I was just wondering what the Worlds Strongest is.
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90 Human Mage
15965
Also, one has to be careful with hard metals.
Even if a metal is super hard, that also means it is really brittle.
You have to know what you wanna use the metal for, and which of the properties take importance. Properties like the stress and strain coefficients, etc.


Yes I know, I'm a blacksmith lol

I was just wondering what the Worlds Strongest is.


Worlds strongest isn't easily determined for just the reasons stated in the thread you were quoting. A metal may have a higher tensile strength but lower shear strength than another. Application is what determines what is used.

For example all structural metal needs to flex. If you put a metal that is too hard in say a skysc#*!#r or aircraft carrier, you are going to kill a lot of people. That is why there are specific instructions for heating and cooling metals for specific application. If you get it too hot you take the temper out making it too soft. If you cool it too quickly, you harden it to the point it will break on first use.

So, there is no strongest metal. It completely depends upon the application. That's why you can't find it on the internet. You can try looking up the hardest or highest tensile strength and you may get somewhere. There likely are alloys that won't show up that are better. But those will be company or government secrets.

Edit: the word bleeped is a word used for very tall buildings such as the empire state building. The filter won't let those 4 letters through.
Edited by Sherri on 7/6/2012 6:44 PM PDT
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89 Night Elf Death Knight
3140
07/18/2012 03:46 PMPosted by Disergo
I'll have to say Gold only because it's used in so many applications. Yeah, Tungsten Carbide, Osmium, and Titanium may be stronger in certain uses, but it doesn't cover the second face shield on an astronauts helmet.


Gold is, last I checked, one of the softer metals. However, gold seems to be great at shielding a great deal of things from both heat, cold and radiation. Iron Man used it as a shield against forming ice in the first movie, thus part of the gold color paint job on his armor.

Also, as I recall, gold is on the face shield of the astronaut helmet to prevent solar radiation from cooking our astronauts when in space; as well, there's the prevention of blindness to consider.
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85 Dwarf Hunter
8525
07/19/2012 09:15 AMPosted by Relesa
I'll have to say Gold only because it's used in so many applications. Yeah, Tungsten Carbide, Osmium, and Titanium may be stronger in certain uses, but it doesn't cover the second face shield on an astronauts helmet.


Gold is, last I checked, one of the softer metals. However, gold seems to be great at shielding a great deal of things from both heat, cold and radiation. Iron Man used it as a shield against forming ice in the first movie, thus part of the gold color paint job on his armor.

Also, as I recall, gold is on the face shield of the astronaut helmet to prevent solar radiation from cooking our astronauts when in space; as well, there's the prevention of blindness to consider.


yeah gold is soft, heavy, and corrosion resistant, conducts electricity ok. it blocks uv and ir radiation well.
http://www.atlweldingsupply.com/Gold_c_271-1-0.html
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