gravity and light

85 Night Elf Hunter
7095
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o5k-nSq78vI
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85 Night Elf Hunter
7095
it goes to a video i made, not trolling, a question really
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90 Troll Shaman
13970
when a ray of light is absorbed by a black hole gravity "holds" light in, but gravity isn't actually moving. A force (gravity) is being applied to the ray of light to prevent it from escaping.

Its like having a sprinter with one end of a rope tied around their waist and the other end tied to a pole. The sprinter wont be able to escape just by running because the pole holds the sprinter in place. But you wouldn't say the pole is faster than the sprinter because the pole is stationary, similar to the field of gravity relative to the black hole.
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89 Night Elf Death Knight
3140
Miranis, have you seen the various videos on Einstein and the openness of space? Most often, this area, open space, is seen as a flat sheet; this material can be altered, by gravity, from large masses.

Basically, to make things very basic, here's two examples:

-----\/------ <- a sun/star (a bowl shape)

-----\ /----- <- a black hole (a cone shape, with a hole at the center)

A sun/star only warps space-time enough to cause things to orbit itself.
A black hole pulls things in, and converts them (typically) into energy later on.

Videos on youtube discussing, "warping of space-time" may help you as well.
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90 Human Mage
12970
In order for gravity to be faster than something, it would have to move. Gravity, by its most basic definition, is a force while light is a moving "object" (best term that I can think of at the moment). That's the simple rebuttal.

Now a bit more complex:

Light, according to how it's defined by science, always travels in a straight line in space-time. What the mass of an object in space-time does is warp space-time around itself, not unlike a heavy ball on a tight sheet (a bit simplified again but it's a fairly good analogy). Because that part of space-time is warped, light traveling through it goes in a straight line as far as it's concerned but its path appears to bend from the point of view of someone in a different frame of reference.

With a black hole, space-time is so warped by its concentrated mass that any light that comes close to its centre (along with anything else) will ultimately take a straight path directly toward that centre, appearing to us as though it's being sucked in.
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