City Exploit Hotfixed

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85 Worgen Rogue
0
And where does 'hacking' come in, apart from your over-active imagination?

Blizzard call this an EXPLOIT, that means it's a BUG that someone figured how to trigger.


Please do any amount of research on this topic before posting further.

10/08/2012 07:26 AMPosted by Kragarn
Just curious, but can't they track these people by their IP addresses? I mean, I can do it on my websites and stuff and then you can use the IP Tracker to narrow down to where people are down to their location's address. Shouldn't Blizz have the technology to do this as well? Creepy, yes, but there's no law against it...

Please research 'proxies', that'll tell you all you need to know.


Please read the previous page(s) in the thread before posting.
92 Tauren Druid
15445
Earlier today, certain realms were affected by an in-game exploit, resulting in the deaths of player characters and non-player characters in some of the major cities. This exploit has already been hotfixed, so it should not be repeatable. It's safe to continue playing and adventuring in major cities and elsewhere in Azeroth.

As with any exploit, we are taking this disruptive action very seriously and conducting a thorough investigation. If you have information relating to this incident, please email hacks@blizzard.com. We apologize for the inconvenience some of you experienced as a result of this and appreciate your understanding.


Glad to hear things are under control now.

May I ask what was the exploit since you hot fixed it?
90 Human Death Knight
11175
Hey I missed the party.

What happened?

Did collision turn-off for multiple players and npcs?
90 Undead Warlock
5195


Hackers can easily conceal IP address, they are hackers. That's what they do.


little story for you; my bro is a geek. full out. has several servers and what not for CoD.. people disruptively hack his servers hiding behind many proxey servers.. he freeks each and every one of them out, by telling them their near exact address, what is in there back yard, and even calls them up. proxies are useless for hiding your location and ip. just takes someone who's smart enough to peal back the layers


This.

Proxies only work when the people you use them against don't have the resources or skills to dig deeper. Besides, if these "hackers" had any sense of what they were doing, they'd probably not only be behind a proxy, but also using free public wifi somewhere away from their homes.

P.S. This event reminded me so much of South Park's "Make love, not warcraft" episode. :D
Edited by Vitalremains on 10/8/2012 9:19 AM PDT
91 Blood Elf Mage
9630
10/07/2012 02:48 PMPosted by Shalanas
This exploit, along with crashing the servers, the DoT being cast on friendlies bug, and a couple of others have seen the same people be involved in them, if you're so serious about it maybe it's time to start handing down permanent bans? I see the same people who I know are responsible still running around in org. It's ridiculous.

They may be circumventing the ban by using new accounts from different IP addresses, or just relying on dynamic IP address protocol so that they can continue to log in from the same computer.

I hope that makes sense, since I'm not an IT professional and pretty much pulled it all out of my butt. >_>
90 Worgen Hunter
4920
For some people their only joy is ruining the fun for others. They serve the darkness not the light.


Some men just want to watch the world burn.

I took your post seriously, but this immediately entered my brain upon reading this. Honestly, everyone that is complaining about a lack of a BAN don't understand what some hackers are capable of. Banning the account isn't enough if you want to take legal action, and that can't be done without a real name and face. Some hackers are extremely good at not being found through digital means.
90 Night Elf Warrior
7495
10/07/2012 02:59 PMPosted by Daghar
How is an exploit anyone elses fault but blizzards? Isn't exploiting something the same as taking advantage of something that's all ready there? I geuss my question is how can some one be punished for useing something that was part of the game? Unless by exploit they mean hacked.


If someone picks your lock and steals your things, how is that anyone else's fault but your own?


This is not even the same thing. An exploit would be the person leaving the house unlocked.

hacking would be picking the locks.
Edited by Asguard on 10/8/2012 9:48 AM PDT
- Hearthstone
100 Tauren Paladin
12695
10/08/2012 07:47 AMPosted by Ghostwolfy
WOOOOOOOOT GO HACKERS! GO HACKERS! WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOT


You mean GO! YOU PACKERS! GO!
90 Troll Shaman
11185
And where does 'hacking' come in, apart from your over-active imagination?

Blizzard call this an EXPLOIT, that means it's a BUG that someone figured how to trigger.


For one thing, you really should check up on those federal laws before typing.

For another, an exploit doesn't have to be a bug exploit. Just do a search on Youtube if you want proof that hacking and exploitation software exists for WoW. Google search will point you towards numerous hack-sites with large communities that actively try and hack the game files. I'd wager the only reason those sites are still up and running, is because Blizzard possibly uses them to identify potential security loopholes, bugs, hacks, and cracks.

Really, any activity online that bypasses security, misrepresents the user, exploits a bug in a system, changes or even looks at proprietary code, or any other number of things, is a felony.

That includes looking at anyone's email, logging on to others' Facebook besides your own account, etc.
100 Gnome Death Knight
20750
If all they did was take advantage of a bug in the client code installed on their own machine, I cannot see how they committed any criminal offense. People have been doing this for years on online games which is why services like PunkBuster were created. They definitely broke their terms of service agreement with Blizzard and they could be pursued in civil court, but I am not sure if they actually commited a criminal offense if what they did is limited to the scope of their own PC. If anyone can point me to a case where anyone was prosecuted for online game hacking of the client code, let me know.
20 Pandaren Monk
4885
That pretty much represents the game population and direction
93 Blood Elf Paladin
7135
10/08/2012 10:54 AMPosted by Frobozz
If all they did was take advantage of a bug in the client code installed on their own machine, I cannot see how they committed any criminal offense.


They were using a third party program with the hack installed on it.
100 Gnome Death Knight
20750
10/08/2012 11:00 AMPosted by Xanaa
If all they did was take advantage of a bug in the client code installed on their own machine, I cannot see how they committed any criminal offense.


They were using a third party program with the hack installed on it.


But the hack was limited to their own client machine. They never hacked into or gained access to Blizzard's or another users machine. These types of exploits have been done for many years on all types of online games. As far as I know, nobody has ever been criminally prosecuted for this and I have never heard of a game company pursuing criminal prosecution. The response is usually to fix the bugs, improve their anti-cheat mechanisms and ban the accounts involved.

It sounds like, instead of actually modifying the game client on their machine, which would trigger the anti-cheat monitoring code, they intercepted the data packets and modified those before the data left their machine.
10/07/2012 02:51 PMPosted by Kitez
personally i like it when this stuff happens. everyone complaining now will be telling this story fondly in a few months

The Ice Stone has Melted
93 Blood Elf Paladin
7135
10/08/2012 11:10 AMPosted by Frobozz


They were using a third party program with the hack installed on it.


But the hack was limited to their own client machine. They never hacked into or gained access to Blizzard's or another users machine. These types of exploits have been done for many years on all types of online games. As far as I know, nobody has ever been criminally prosecuted for this and I have never heard of a game company pursuing criminal prosecution. The response is usually to fix the bugs, improve their anti-cheat mechanisms and ban the accounts involved.

It sounds like, instead of actually modifying the game client on their machine, which would trigger the anti-cheat monitoring code, they intercepted the data packets and modified those before the data left their machine.


Blizzard has gone after 3rd party hack developers before.
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