Goldrinn - Why Lo'Gosh?

90 Dwarf Priest
10685
It's always struck me as odd that orcs have their own name for an Azerothian Ancient that they should have only met a few decades ago at best. One of the NPCs says that Lo'Gosh was known to the Orcs on Draenor, but this is weird because he's specifically native to Azeroth...
Edited by Fifira on 5/11/2013 4:08 PM PDT
Reply Quote
90 Night Elf Hunter
17250
It's always struck me as odd that orcs have their own name for an Azerothian Ancient that they should have only met a few decades ago at best. One of the NPCs says that Lo'Gosh was known to the Orcs on Draenor, but this is weird because he's specifically native to Azeroth...


Goldrinn chose as his champion a cursed, mutant, magically doubled alien robot (Varian Wyrnn).

I personally feel that's the bigger issue with him.
Reply Quote
I've tried thinking of a way to explain it though I'm not very knowledgeable on this subject, but Takrik Ragehowl explains it kind of well, sort of.

Lo'Gosh is the spirit of the hunter, the animal instinct that kicks in when one smells food or sees one's children in jeopardy. He has always been with us, a part of our Horde, in our instincts and in our blood.
He has appeared in many forms, both on our world and here. On Azeroth, he is seen as a great white wolf, ferocious and cunning. The night elves call him "Goldrinn."
They tell of a legendary battle thousand years ago, where Lo'Gosh fought off the demon hordes. Do you want to hear about it?


I think in terms of Lo'Gosh they are referring to that feeling and instincts that come about when in battle or hunting. Goldrinn just happen to be maybe a physical manifestation of said emotion born from Azeroth in protection of itself I think. So they therefor now call Goldrinn Lo'Gosh because that's what he is to them. He represents those instincts and emotions so to them the spirit of Lo'Gosh is manifested in Goldrinn.

Ancient Guardians sort of confuse me honestly.

Edit: I could of course be quite wrong. Omacron or even Ferlion could probably tell you better in depth.
Edited by Haaely on 5/11/2013 4:24 PM PDT
Reply Quote
90 Night Elf Druid
9145
Lo'gosh comes from the Tauren, not the Orcs.

Them knowing him from Draenor isn't true.
Reply Quote
90 Dwarf Priest
10685
I've tried thinking of a way to explain it though I'm not very knowledgeable on this subject, but Takrik Ragehowl explains it kind of well, sort of.

Lo'Gosh is the spirit of the hunter, the animal instinct that kicks in when one smells food or sees one's children in jeopardy. He has always been with us, a part of our Horde, in our instincts and in our blood.
He has appeared in many forms, both on our world and here. On Azeroth, he is seen as a great white wolf, ferocious and cunning. The night elves call him "Goldrinn."
They tell of a legendary battle thousand years ago, where Lo'Gosh fought off the demon hordes. Do you want to hear about it?


I think in terms of Lo'Gosh they are referring to that feeling and instincts that come about when in battle or hunting. Goldrinn just happen to be maybe a physical manifestation of said emotion born from Azeroth in protection of itself I think. So they therefor now call Goldrinn Lo'Gosh because that's what he is to them. He represents those instincts and emotions so to them the spirit of Lo'Gosh is manifested in Goldrinn.

Ancient Guardians sort of confuse me honestly.

Edit: I could of course be quite wrong. Omacron or even Ferlion could probably tell you better in depth.


As a world builder, there's a lot left blank about parts of the cosmology which drives me nuts, and this thread is sort of a "backdoor" discussion into that. What the hell is the deal with the ancients?

Lo'gosh comes from the Tauren, not the Orcs.

Them knowing him from Draenor isn't true.


Tak'rik Ragehowl seems to be speaking otherwise.
Edited by Fifira on 5/11/2013 4:36 PM PDT
Reply Quote
Lo'gosh comes from the Tauren, not the Orcs.

Them knowing him from Draenor isn't true.


Yes, but the Orcs adopted the term and have been using it ever since. Although now that I think about it I'm not sure if I recall them having a term or anything for Lo'Gosh and such while on Draenor.
Reply Quote
Tak'rik Ragehowl seems to be speaking otherwise.


I do believe he is correct, Lo'Gosh is an adopted term from the Tauren. The Orcs I believe never put a name to said instincts and such, it was just a part of who they are. Orcs were never very fluent or ugh can't think of the word for them.

Most likely by association with the Tauren they learned of the term Lo'Gosh and it's meaning and adopted it for themselves.
Reply Quote
90 Night Elf Druid
9145
Tak'rik Ragehowl seems to be speaking otherwise.


He is wrong.

I'll have to dig up where it was said, but the Tauren are the only one's familiar with Lo'gosh (that name specifically) and they passed it on to the Orcs.

It, of course, could also be that the Orcs are telling tales and lies to newer generations of Orcs (the new players) to cement their place into Azeroth and crib local religious and important figures by making them apart of their own history.

Sort of like Christianity did with many Pagan thematic. It does make a certain amount of sense considering Orcs are inevitably going to be the master race on Azeroth due to their rate of reproduction, rate of growth, superior physical speed and strength, and intelligence equal to all but the gnomes and goblins.

Having them begin this process now will make it easier for any future stories Blizzard tells in the far off time to relate to Azeroth from a cultural stand point.
Edited by Ferlion on 5/11/2013 4:44 PM PDT
Reply Quote
90 Night Elf Priest
11530
In the comic, Reghar says that "Lo'Gosh"", the orcs know him thanks to the tauren.
Edited by Serendia on 5/11/2013 4:45 PM PDT
Reply Quote
05/11/2013 04:42 PMPosted by Ferlion
Tak'rik Ragehowl seems to be speaking otherwise.


He is wrong.

I'll have to dig up where it was said, but the Tauren are the only one's familiar with Lo'gosh (that name specifically) and they passed it on to the Orcs.

It, of course, could also be that the Orcs are telling tales and lies to newer generations of Orcs (the new players) to cement their place into Azeroth and crib local religious and important figures by making them apart of their own history.

Sort of like Christianity did with many Pagan thematic. It does make a certain amount of sense considering Orcs are inevitably going to be the master race on Azeroth due to their rate of reproduction, rate of growth, superior physical speed and strength, and intelligence equal to all but the gnomes and goblins.

Having them begin this process now will make it easier for any future stories Blizzard tells in the far off time to relate to Azeroth from a cultural stand point.


I hate defending Orcs.

They didn't come up with Lo'Gosh no, but like Takrik said he had many different forms even on Draenor.

Shamanistic Orcs I would imagine recognize a sort of spiritual influence to them when hunting or in battle or whatever that they knew of, but never really put a name too. Those instincts that take over can sort of be like a spiritual influence on the outside.

So when they associated with Tauren they could of heard them referencing to Lo'Gosh and what he represents and then just adopted said term and meaning into their own culture.

Things are getting off course by the term Lo'Gosh.
Edited by Haaely on 5/11/2013 4:48 PM PDT
Reply Quote
90 Night Elf Priest
11530
But Reghar said : the orcs know him only by the Tauren. "Lo'Gosh" comes Taurahe language.
Reply Quote
But Reghar said : the orcs know him only by the Tauren. "Lo'Gosh" comes Taurahe language.


Yea it seem what I'm trying to convey isn't working very well.

I'm not referring to the the actual Goldrinn and Lo'Gosh anymore honestly just what he represents. Each Ancient sort of has a representation in nature or emotion or something I always believed.

Like Takrik says "Lo'Gosh is the spirit of the hunter, the animal instinct that kicks in when one smells food or sees one's children in jeopardy" so it's more about that kind of instinctual and spiritual influence they knew of.

On Azeroth he appears as a Giant White wolf, maybe on their world it was just that spiritual like influence they got when they were in battle or out on the hunt and that is what 'form' he is referring too that appeared on Draenor.

When they came in contact with the Tauren and their stories of Lo'Gosh and who and what he was they adopted the term into their own culture on how they view those animal instincts and such.

Lo'Gosh himself was of course never on Draenor because his being is attached to Azeroth, but there is still that spirit in him or that he represents that can be recognized by everyone all over the world.

Edit: Honestly I'm just kind of theorizing my own thoughts and feeling on this.
Edited by Haaely on 5/11/2013 4:56 PM PDT
Reply Quote
90 Night Elf Druid
9145
Goldrinn may be a symbol of ferocity and something that people who feel those emotions look to, but in the end he's an aspect of nature like every other Ancient. It has nothing to do with emotion.
Reply Quote
Goldrinn may be a symbol of ferocity and something that people who feel those emotions look to, but in the end he's an aspect of nature like every other Ancient. It has nothing to do with emotion.


Well you could say ferocity is kind of a nature, but whatever that's not the point.

That's what I'm trying to say, Symbol was the word I was looking for, Goldrinn/Lo'Gosh was a physical manifestation to the Orcs of those instincts and emotions they felt while back on Draenor and that was the form they took while on Draenor while here on Azeroth Goldrinn/Lo'Gosh is that form.

Therefor they adopted the term Lo'Gosh and who he was into their own culture and melded it with what they knew before back on Draenor.

Edit: Been saying represent because I couldn't think of symbol lol
Edited by Haaely on 5/11/2013 5:03 PM PDT
Reply Quote
I recall many times Orcs usually saying "The spirit of Lo'Gosh" so they are more referring to that ferocity and those instinctual feelings he symbolizes more than Lo'Gosh himself.
Reply Quote
90 Night Elf Priest
11530
The ghostly wolf appears in Outland has nothing to do with Goldrinn of Azeroth.
Goldrinn of Azeroth is a ancient like aviana, Malorne, etc..
Edited by Serendia on 5/11/2013 5:18 PM PDT
Reply Quote
The ghostly wolf appears in Outland has nothing to do with Goldrinn of Azeroth.
Goldrinn of Azeroth is a ancient like aviana, Malorne, etc..


No one ever said it did have anything to do with Goldrinn.

I don't recall ever bringing it up either.
Edited by Haaely on 5/11/2013 5:17 PM PDT
Reply Quote
90 Night Elf Priest
11530
Ahhh,so yep its true that the orcs had their own "spirit wolf" in draenor, but him isnt' the same "lo'gosh".

http://www.wowhead.com/quest=10791
Reply Quote
Ahhh,so yep its true that the orcs had their own "spirit wolf" in draenor, but him isnt' the same "lo'gosh".

http://www.wowhead.com/quest=10791


Most likely not, never done that quest either.
Edited by Haaely on 5/11/2013 5:22 PM PDT
Reply Quote

Goldrinn chose as his champion a cursed, mutant, magically doubled alien robot (Varian Wyrnn).

I personally feel that's the bigger issue with him.


Good point. Varian is freakin' metal. I'd totally choose that too.
Edited by Caedmun on 5/11/2013 5:23 PM PDT
Reply Quote

Please report any Code of Conduct violations, including:

Threats of violence. We take these seriously and will alert the proper authorities.

Posts containing personal information about other players. This includes physical addresses, e-mail addresses, phone numbers, and inappropriate photos and/or videos.

Harassing or discriminatory language. This will not be tolerated.

Forums Code of Conduct

Report Post # written by

Reason
Explain (256 characters max)
Submit Cancel

Reported!

[Close]