Jobs are not charity

General Discussion
Dear kids,

Jobs are not charity.

When an employer needs work done, they hire someone to do the job.

When an employer no longer need that work done, them and the employee part ways.

It is as simple as that.

I would suggest reading ''Basic economics'' by Thomas Sowell for further expanding on the principal I succinctly described.

P.S. every dislike on this post shows how needed economics education really is
02/14/2019 10:14 AMPosted by Herowar
every dislike on this post shows how needed economics education really is


Every post of yours shows the need for a basic understanding of sentence structure and grammar.
02/14/2019 10:14 AMPosted by Herowar
Dear kids,

Jobs are not charity.

When an employer needs work done, they hire someone to do the job.

When an employer no longer need that work done, them and the employee part ways.

It is as simple as that.

I would suggest reading ''Basic economics'' by Thomas Sowell for further expanding on the principal I succinctly described.

P.S. every dislike on this post shows how needed economics education really is
Yah, you treat your employees like that and watch the David Brevik's walk out at the first opportunity.
1.) Gameplay first - be it art, programming or customer support.
Churning up production rates to pump games out faster, cutting support roles out of the structure does not support the very first mission statement of Blizzard.

2.)Commit to Quality - Well, if you're pushing for content so fast you're missing the quality part you're going to have a bad time. Now that supportive roles are out of the picture who exactly commits to quality outside of development?

3.) Play nice, Play fair - That's a yikes, I'm no communist or by any means left leaning but I can definitely see some disparity between the 29th highest paid executive in the world over the employees that got the knife. How about re-training and re purposing those 800? I'm sure there are a lot of helpful hands that would play nice and fair to them in the Blizzard world.

4.) Embrace the inner geek - there's none of that left it's about embracing numbers. Continuing a good lore such as Diablo on MOBILE?! lol get out of here.

5.) Every voice matters - 800 of them isn't enough.

6.) Think Globally - Well this one they are doing, with making mobile a top priority and but actually leaving their US base behind the people that made them who they are. PC Gamers.

7.) Lead responsibly - LOL, yep I don't even need to type a response to this.

8.) Learn and grow - Damn I'm sure those 800 would have loved to learn something new.

We are not seeing the Blizzard that set forth these rules or missions anymore

Forum Mod Edit: This post has been edited by a moderator due to language. https://us.battle.net/forums/en/code-of-conduct/
To be honest, the OP is 100% right.

I have been laid off from very good jobs multiple times. From companies much bigger than Act/Blizz. I know how bad it sucks.

Society somehow gets all mixed up and thinks these places are in the business of supplying employment.

If I got laid off from my current job, would i be upset? Sure. Would i blame my employer? Absolutely not.

If the company I work for announced output for 2019 would be 90% of what 2018 was, i would know for sure that a 10% lay off was coming. Why should they keep uneeded employees onboard? At this point, it would in fact be charity.

After suffering many hardships from layoffs over the years, i realized my extreme dependency on well paying employment was my own fault. I had set myself up as a slave to such employment.
You are not saying anything that we don't already know. There is more to jobs, more to the relationship between employer and employee than a mere duty and a paycheck. There is a work environment along with some places where the employees see each other as a family. Even Blizz has, at least in the past, have no doubt said to new hires welcome to the Blizzard family. Also it goes to how you treat your workers as well. All of that done right and you will get a good productive worker the majority of the time. All of that done wrong and you will not likely have any productive workers at all. The quality of their work will suffer and show it big time.
02/14/2019 10:57 AMPosted by ShadowAegis
You are not saying anything that we don't already know. There is more to jobs, more to the relationship between employer and employee than a mere duty and a paycheck. There is a work environment along with some places where the employees see each other as a family. Even Blizz has, at least in the past, have no doubt said to new hires welcome to the Blizzard family. Also it goes to how you treat your workers as well. All of that done right and you will get a good productive worker the majority of the time. All of that done wrong and you will not likely have any productive workers at all. The quality of their work will suffer and show it big time.


Absolutely, but that is all what Bobby Big Bucks wants to kill.
02/14/2019 10:47 AMPosted by Exuri

We are not seeing the Blizzard that set forth these rules or missions anymore


I agree.

However that has nothing to do with the simple truth I expressed, which many seem to not understand i.e. "DISGUSTING layoffs". I personally got a good chuckle over that choice of wording :D
Jobs are not charity. But, an employee is intended to add value to a company, which is why some employers decide to invest in their employees and have them (re-)trained. And, for a large multi-national company that is publicly traded, laying off hundreds of skilled employees looks less like a company that is growing, and more like a company that is seeking to cut operating costs due to an unanticipated sales slump.

Hopefully, nobody actually disputes the fact that Blizzard can hire/fire whomever they want. However, the "optics" of it do not trend favorably for the company doing the lay offs, because most people understand the hardship of being temporarily out of work.
every blizz title needs a lot of work to be considered smooth at all.
they couldve used some of those 800 for sure ;)

there was a time where blizzard was associated with quality.
*bursts laughing*

wtf happened.
02/14/2019 10:47 AMPosted by Exuri

8.) Learn and grow - Damn I'm sure those 800 would have loved to learn something new.

[/quote]
Wait what? Do you even think about you are getting laid off? It's PR's and HR's and micro managers. The are tightening in to focus more on raw development rather than big exposure.

One example is that Bungie was freed to utilize those developers on actual Acti/Bliz projects, and don't need the PR managers to promote Destiny any more. This is also what the investors reacted to, a company that seems to want to get back to its core - making games.
The thing I'm wondering is "Were they told?", and I mean directly. If a worker is constantly late, not doing their job correctly, not fixing their mistakes when they're told how to do it right, etc, then yeah, on a Tuesday morning tell them not to come in again.

But if they're doing their jobs right, they're on-time, and care about their role, I should like to think they were given a notice. I've also read they got some severance and job seeking aid, so it's not as cold as the headline seems.
02/14/2019 03:25 PMPosted by Deruvia
The thing I'm wondering is "Were they told?", and I mean directly. If a worker is constantly late, not doing their job correctly, not fixing their mistakes when they're told how to do it right, etc, then yeah, on a Tuesday morning tell them not to come in again.

But if they're doing their jobs right, they're on-time, and care about their role, I should like to think they were given a notice. I've also read they got some severance and job seeking aid, so it's not as cold as the headline seems.
There was zero notice given.
02/14/2019 03:25 PMPosted by Deruvia
The thing I'm wondering is "Were they told?", and I mean directly. If a worker is constantly late, not doing their job correctly, not fixing their mistakes when they're told how to do it right, etc, then yeah, on a Tuesday morning tell them not to come in again.

But if they're doing their jobs right, they're on-time, and care about their role, I should like to think they were given a notice. I've also read they got some severance and job seeking aid, so it's not as cold as the headline seems.


For MOST, there was zero notice. They were allowed to clean out desks, so not the escort them out type thing. They were let go that same day though. There are a few who were told they have a few months and will be let go at X date. So many people I know closely were hit, people who were doing great jobs. It was not the job quality, it was the fact that they were deemed "excess" staff for 2019 during a year with fewer releases.

Letting go trained and experienced staff is not something you can easily fix when you need them again - and Blizz will. Some of the folks let go were there 12-14 years. This was not a first in/first out scenario.

Now, some likely expected it, if they were on something like the esports HotS team which shut down HotS esports competitions. I am sure those at Activision involved with Destiny, which recently went back to Bungie expected it. Many others did not.
02/14/2019 03:32 PMPosted by Bravata
02/14/2019 03:25 PMPosted by Deruvia
The thing I'm wondering is "Were they told?", and I mean directly. If a worker is constantly late, not doing their job correctly, not fixing their mistakes when they're told how to do it right, etc, then yeah, on a Tuesday morning tell them not to come in again.

But if they're doing their jobs right, they're on-time, and care about their role, I should like to think they were given a notice. I've also read they got some severance and job seeking aid, so it's not as cold as the headline seems.
There was zero notice given.


If that's the case, that part was indeed low rent.
Usually layoffs are given with 0 notice to prevent the victims from sabotaging the company out of retaliation. I work at a bio-production plant and we had to hire the police to facilitate a day of mass layoffs to make sure no one shuts off breakers in the plant causing millions of $ of damage.
02/14/2019 03:32 PMPosted by Bravata
02/14/2019 03:25 PMPosted by Deruvia
The thing I'm wondering is "Were they told?", and I mean directly. If a worker is constantly late, not doing their job correctly, not fixing their mistakes when they're told how to do it right, etc, then yeah, on a Tuesday morning tell them not to come in again.

But if they're doing their jobs right, they're on-time, and care about their role, I should like to think they were given a notice. I've also read they got some severance and job seeking aid, so it's not as cold as the headline seems.
There was zero notice given.
Sadly a employer does not have to give you two weeks notice only employees give two weeks notice unless they want to completely burn that bridge;employers give severance package and out the door.
02/14/2019 10:14 AMPosted by Herowar
Dear kids,

Jobs are not charity.

When an employer needs work done, they hire someone to do the job.

When an employer no longer need that work done, them and the employee part ways.

It is as simple as that.

I would suggest reading ''Basic economics'' by Thomas Sowell for further expanding on the principal I succinctly described.

P.S. every dislike on this post shows how needed economics education really is


So if we downvote an extremely dumb post that doesn't actually encapsulate economics in any way, that means economics education is really needed? Thanks for providing this tidbit - I had no idea.

Jobs are not charity.
Some literally are, but okay - I will extrapolate this sentence as saying, in general, jobs are to have some type of mutual exchange. Got it.

When an employer needs work done, they hire someone to do the job.
Or they handle it internally with their existing resources, but okay. Regardless, no !@#$.

When an employer no longer need that work done, them and the employee part ways.
Do they? Isn't it possible that the employer simply reallocates the resources they had working on the presumably completed project to another project? If possible, that is typically the best thing to do since existing resources already have established relationships within the company and, in most cases, do not require the level of training a brand new resource would. This line of thinking leads me to believe it is you who probably needs a refreshing on economics as it relates to good workplace practices from a managerial perspective. Employees are not outright disposable commodities - there are very good reasons for employee retention. Maybe your book talks about those?

It is as simple as that.
No it is not.

I would suggest reading ''Basic economics'' by Thomas Sowell for further expanding on the principal I succinctly described.
I guess succinctly doesn't necessarily mean correctly, so sure.

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