New light radius

General Discussion
One of the major things that concerns me right now is the apparent lack of a good light radius. What do I mean by good? I mean you can barely see monsters at the edges of the screen and that makes for a diablo atmosphere. Now everything looks so bright even in dungeons (and I'm not not talking about art style) with a subtle barely there light radius. I have heard that the light radius gets more intense later in the game but have yet to see pics. Since a smaller light radius is by most considered to be a disadvantage, whats the harm in providing an option to turn on "dark mode" or whatever it would be called? This is a huge loss IMO and absolutely essential to any diablo game. Maybe blizz got the wrong idea because many people used maphack to completely brighten the screen?

Since I doubt I am getting a blue post with any info on light radius, who has played the most recent beta? How did you find the light radius? Did it feel like diablo?

EDIT: by beta I mean the blizzcon beta/demo/alpha whatever it's called.
I believe Bashiok mentioned on the old forums that they had made tweaks to light radius. I can't remember the details though.
09/01/2011 10:51 AMPosted by Lomak
So yea, would be nice if people would !@#$ about this ignorant topic already. You literally have to be blind and stupid to think d2 had a "dark" or "gritty" art direction, when in reality it's more bright than everything we've seen out of d3 already.


It's so great that not only do you have no idea what you're talking about but you also didn't read the post. I specifically mentioned it does not have to do with art style.
09/01/2011 11:16 AMPosted by Lomak
I specifically mentioned it does not have to do with art style.


The lighting techniques fall directly into the 'art style' category, and though you may think they were amazing in d2 looking back through those rose tinted glasses, in reality they were subpar. The reason everyone loves d2 is because the fluid gameplay and it's an easy game to enjoy. The lighting has less than nothing to do with it.

How about you provide some examples of what it is your looking for in d3. Perhaps this?

http://pinkdandelion.com/images/blackness.jpg


I must say I'm really amazed that you know why everyone liked diablo. Especially why I liked it. You must be some kind of sorcerer. I'm alt + tabbing in and out of D2 right now which is what got me to make this thread. This isn't about point sources or palette choice etc its just about light radius. Thats all. And since I would really need to play the game to see if the pics represent the actual experience I am calling for those who have played the beta to comment.

I managed to find a post about Bash commenting on tweaking light radius. That has me optimistic. Thanks for the note, ThorIsHere.
I can see where both sides are coming from. I think it is more textures and colors of D2 that gave it its dark feeling. Still we haven't played D3 yet so in all honesty we don't really know how we will feel playing it. I'm just glad they are not slacking on the gore, like the guy impaled to the wall. :)
We use lighting to add flavor and distinction to each dungeon. A lot of the bigger dungeons tend to be well lit with a specific palette to add to the feel and separate it from other locations. It's about visual variety. And the absence of light is included in that variety. We do change the amount of light from dungeon to dungeon, cave to cave, and there are specific areas where it's much, much darker, and the light radius comes into play. But it's used as a tool to create that visual distinction, and not a rule that applies to the entire game. (We don't have any intent to add a +light radius affix, just because it'd be less useful than it was in Diablo II.)

We try to keep the visuals changing from area to area, even within the same Act. It keeps the game interesting, and is its own reward when a player makes it to that next area and the color palette does a complete shift and the area changes from a dark and foggy moor with blues and greens to a starkly clear dungeon with reds and purples. It's a very powerful way of reinforcing progression. Most people don't think about it as a gameplay mechanic, but it absolutely is.
I think I'm going to have to actually slow down my play style and try to enjoy all the work put into this game.
We use lighting to add flavor and distinction to each dungeon. A lot of the bigger dungeons tend to be well lit with a specific palette to add to the feel and separate it from other locations. It's about visual variety. And the absence of light is included in that variety. We do change the amount of light from dungeon to dungeon, cave to cave, and there are specific areas where it's much, much darker, and the light radius comes into play. But it's used as a tool to create that visual distinction, and not a rule that applies to the entire game. (We don't have any intent to add a +light radius affix, just because it'd be less useful than it was in Diablo II.)

We try to keep the visuals changing from area to area, even within the same Act. It keeps the game interesting, and is its own reward when a player makes it to that next area and the color palette does a complete shift and the area changes from a dark and foggy moor with blues and greens to a starkly clear dungeon with reds and purples. It's a very powerful way of reinforcing progression. Most people don't think about it as a gameplay mechanic, but it absolutely is.


Makes me wonder how many of the zones we haven't seen yet :)
Thanks Bashiok, totally agree with your perspective. It actually isn't too far off from how it worked in D2 anyhow. Dungeons and poor lit buildings were really dark, and Night could be dark. Then there were areas, like hell, that were fairly bright.
We use lighting to add flavor and distinction to each dungeon. A lot of the bigger dungeons tend to be well lit with a specific palette to add to the feel and separate it from other locations. It's about visual variety. And the absence of light is included in that variety. We do change the amount of light from dungeon to dungeon, cave to cave, and there are specific areas where it's much, much darker, and the light radius comes into play. But it's used as a tool to create that visual distinction, and not a rule that applies to the entire game. (We don't have any intent to add a +light radius affix, just because it'd be less useful than it was in Diablo II.)

We try to keep the visuals changing from area to area, even within the same Act. It keeps the game interesting, and is its own reward when a player makes it to that next area and the color palette does a complete shift and the area changes from a dark and foggy moor with blues and greens to a starkly clear dungeon with reds and purples. It's a very powerful way of reinforcing progression. Most people don't think about it as a gameplay mechanic, but it absolutely is.


Makes me wonder how many of the zones we haven't seen yet :)


You the map maker onetwo? Just curious :P
My end game build goal was to make a Monk with max light radius and call him Mohsis... Grrr


Makes me wonder how many of the zones we haven't seen yet :)


You the map maker onetwo? Just curious :P


I am. There is only one onetwo. Well actually there's a possible 998 more but I'll crush them in due time.
09/01/2011 03:07 PMPosted by MrNoodles
My end game build goal was to make a Monk with max light radius and call him Mohsis... Grrr


Wha?
Do we get to go back to hell? :P

Join the Conversation

Return to Forum