PayPal; why can't we cashout our Bnet account

General Discussion
Also, any proceeds from the sale of items in the currency-based auction house that have been deposited into the Battle.net account will not be transferrable to the third-party payment service account.

http://us.battle.net/d3/en/services/auction-house/info


You have to set your account to send funds to the battle.net wallet or to paypal. There is no middle ground. Battle.net wallet cannot be cashed out. Once it's in there, it's in there for good.

So say you have your account setup to cash out through PayPal. You sell the Axe of the Frozen Dude. Blizzard takes their cut, sends the money to PayPal. PayPal applies their standard flat rate PLUS their percentage cut. Then you get your money (assuming you stay under the withdrawal limit for the month). You sell another Axe of the Frozen Dude. This happens again.

Why can't we just put everything in the Blizzard wallet and then cashout through PayPal in one lump sum? Will special arrangements with PayPal be made to qualify for the micropayments plan with PayPal (Receiving (selling) 5% + $0.05 USD)? At least it will completely gut margin trading, I suppose?

If most items go for about $1, then after calculating Blizzard fees and PayPal fees (1.9% to 2.9% + $0.30 USD†), we're left with just about nothing.
I don't understand why people think "most items" will go for "about $1".

google d2 items, and check out what the 3rd party sites are selling d2 items for. some are $1, some are $200. And these people have multiple computers running bots to get them. I knew a guy that did this, started with 1 computer, ended up with about 7 running 24/7. Not sure if he got caught or not, after he quit work, we didn't stay in touch.

A lot of people farming will affect the economy for sure, but i highly doubt to the point a lot of people seem to think.

That being said, i do think it is silly to be forced to choose up front where the money is going to end up, but I can understand why. If its in the blizzard account and can't be removed, blizzard doesn't have to keep it on the books as an accounts payable thing that we could cash in at any time. If it were, blizzard would have potentially thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of dollars tied up in something it doesn't need it tied up in.
i would like to see a way to cash out. i think a reason they wont do it is say you get your account hacked they change you email and what your paypal goes to they steal all your money and split. that wouldnt be good i know paypal has a way to get your money back but say your out of town or just lose interest in the game for a few months and leave 100 bucks on there. would be bad too see it was all cashed out 3 weeks ago and nothing you can do about it.
I honestly don't know what I will do. I plan on using the RMAH daily once I get to the level where I start acquiring sell-able items.

It will all depend on the cuts pay-pal and blizz take. The percentage based cuts won't be a problem as they obviously scale depending on the price you sell.

It's the flat rate cuts that scare me. Rare (yellow) d2 equivalent items could be a decent everyday seller for around 20 cents - $1.50 (estimate). The percentage cuts will only be a few cents from a dollar and rounded up 2 cents off a 20 cent item. The flat rates however, could possibly keep rare items off the RMAH all together.

If they kept flat rates off single sales less than $3, it would make a ton of sense. One thing in mind though, depending on the flat rate cuts, this may keep the gold AH active by forcing players to sell items worth less than $3 on that AH instead.
I don't understand why people think "most items" will go for "about $1".

google d2 items, and check out what the 3rd party sites are selling d2 items for. some are $1, some are $200. And these people have multiple computers running bots to get them. I knew a guy that did this, started with 1 computer, ended up with about 7 running 24/7. Not sure if he got caught or not, after he quit work, we didn't stay in touch.

A lot of people farming will affect the economy for sure, but i highly doubt to the point a lot of people seem to think.

That being said, i do think it is silly to be forced to choose up front where the money is going to end up, but I can understand why. If its in the blizzard account and can't be removed, blizzard doesn't have to keep it on the books as an accounts payable thing that we could cash in at any time. If it were, blizzard would have potentially thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of dollars tied up in something it doesn't need it tied up in.


Because in D3 there wont be 15 websites competing with eachother setting prices, the players will be competing with eachother setting prices.
This eliminates your account from getting hacked - your bnet funds being dumped to a paypal account and the thief moving on. This way the only way they can profit from stolen accounts is to take items and move them to another account. (which can be reversed fairly quick upon their detecting or you detecting account theft.)
Perhaps I'm not understanding it correctly but even if you get hacked and you have $100 in your Bnet account would they not just be able to buy their own items on the auction house with the money on the account?
In D2 the # of websites are low and they can control supply, and demand is high, so they can sell for very high prices. There is also a risk factor involved, which also increases the price.


This makes sense. I didn't look at it as a sort of price setting agreement between major players, and now its every man woman and child for themselves.
There are two good reasons for doing it this way, and one reason that it doesn't even matter:

Good Reasons To Do It This Way
1) Hackers. If you were allowed to accumulate a balance on battle.net that could be cashed out at any time, then the incentive for hackers to attempt to take over accounts and transfer that cash to their own accounts goes through the roof. The amount of headaches involved in this scenario make the d2 dupe/bot/hack problems seem like a minor graphics glitch by comparison.

Under this system, either it's going straight to your PayPal account--set up ahead of time and so almost certainly 'your' account--or it's going to your battle.net balance, where if you're hacked it can only be spent on Blizzard products and the RMAH--all easy things for Blizzard to reimburse/reverse in case of account compromise.

2) Cost. Maintaining a virtual balance that can never leave the battle.net system is almost certainly a lot less resource-taxing than keeping a floating balance that could be transferred out at any time, in whole or in part. This should result in a lower fee than might otherwise exist for the RMAH listing. In addition, incentivizing people to keep the money 'in the system' will result in more people buying things off the RMAH with their battle.net balance, which means more listing fees which should also = more fees for Blizzard and less need for each individual fee to be as expensive.

Why It Doesn't Really Matter
Have a battle.net balance but want the cash? Follow these steps:
1) Determine how much you want to cash out.
2) Determine the gold-to-dollar market rate
3) Buy gold on the RMAH with your e-balance at an amount equal to or slightly higher than the cash amount you want
4) Relist that gold right back on the RMAH, but as a straight-to-PayPal auction
5) Profit...that you can touch
Why It Doesn't Really Matter
Have a battle.net balance but want the cash? Follow these steps:
1) Determine how much you want to cash out.
2) Determine the gold-to-dollar market rate
3) Buy gold on the RMAH with your e-balance at an amount equal to or slightly higher than the cash amount you want
4) Relist that gold right back on the RMAH, but as a straight-to-PayPal auction
5) Profit...that you can touch


Easier...run a second account or find a friend you really trust.

Set up an auction on the second account (or friend's account) for the amount of your eBalance (i.e. crude boots for $300.00). Buy boots on your account for $300. Transfer funds to PayPal on second account.
Blizzard is not a bank. They don't want to be a bank.

Having an account that at any time you can take money out of in whole or in part... makes them a bank.

Do you understand how much trouble it is for a company that is not a bank to have accounts that function pretty much like bank accounts? It's a PitA. As well as not worth it.
If you have money on your battle.net account that can be cashed out at anytime Blizzard then gets treated like a bank and is subject to banking regulation.

/thread
paypal has spent alot time figuring out these questions so they prob found loopholes and shortcuts to fk everyone over.
So what happens when you cancel your account? You've got upwards of 200 blizzard dollars in that account. Will they just say "thanks"? What happens if your account gets banned? I don't think you should lose hundreds of unspent dollars because you hacked a map in the game, or ran your mouth. I wonder what the ToS will say to allow them to just absorb money when accounts are cancelled and other ways people lose accounts.
So I can use my Diablo 3 addiction to pay for my WoW addiction. Blizzard are a bunch of enablers.

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