Echoing Fury sold for 7,500 euros

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I think it's safe to say there will NEVER be a better one.

This one is the grandmother of all rolls.
11/30/2012 08:59 PMPosted by Bomberman2
impressive. i wonder when the first item will sell for $100,000 or even one day at a $1,000,000.


You are behind the times (if you mean a virtual item in general)... :)

"On December 14, 2004, the game creators MindArk announced the conclusion of the first 'Treasure Island Sale'. This was a virtual island put up for auction. The winning bidder, an avatar named Zachurm 'Deathifier' Emegen, paid 265,000 PED (US$26,500) for the island."

"On November 9, 2005, the BBC reported that 'Deathifier' had recouped his investment in under a year. He made money by selling virtual homes as well as taxing other gamers to hunt or mine on the island."

---

"On October 24, 2005, a virtual 'Asteroid Space Resort' was bought by Jon 'Neverdie' Jacobs for a sum of 1,000,000 PED (US$100,000), greatly surpassing the sale of Treasure Island."

---

"On May 2, 2006, MindArk announced the introduction of an ATM card enabling players to withdraw the real-world currency equivalent of their PED funds directly from any real-world Versatel ATMs. As reported on the BBC newsfeed users could sell virtual items online and then go purchase a dinner for themselves down the street in real life with this cash card technology. It was stated that $165 million had 'passed through the game' in 2005 and that this figure was expected to double in 2006."

---

"Mike Everest, a home-schooled high school senior from Durango, Colorado, and his mother earned $35,000 in 2006 by constructing and selling weapons in Entropia."

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"On May 8, 2007, MindArk announced the results of the world's first virtual Banking license auction.

"Each winner must add a further US$100,000 as working capital."

"- Avatar 'Janus JD D'Arcwire', representing Wirecard Bank AG, who paid US$59,060.

- Russian Internet Payment Provider MONETA.ru, with avatar 'Yuri iNTellect' who paid US$99,900.

- Entropia celebrity 'Jon NEVERDIE Jacobs', who paid US$90,000.

- Second Life virtual celebrity and entrepreneur Anshe Chung, who paid US$60,000.

- Avatar 'Jolana Kitty Brice', an Entropia Universe participant and entrepreneur who paid US$95,000.
"

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"On December 8, 2009, the sale of the Crystal Palace Space Station was announced. A public auction held from December 14, 2009 through December 28, 2009 determined the new owner. It was won by Buzz Erik Lightyear who paid 3.3 million PED, or US$330,000 for it."

---

"The Entropia Universe entered the Guinness World Records Book in both 2004 and 2008 for the most expensive virtual world objects ever sold, and in 2009, a virtual space station, a popular destination, sold for $330,000. This was then eclipsed in November 2010 when Jon Jacobs sold a virtual resort on Planet Calypso for $635,000; this property was sold in chunks, with the largest sold for $335,000."
11/30/2012 08:52 PMPosted by VanityC
Man... I saw a guy driving a Ferrari on the other day. I hope the government strip his wealth so all of us can drive Ferraris, too!


FAIL.

I hate people who use this argument.

He EARNED that Ferrari IRL. He worked for a living, and was successful by his skills.

These people did NOT earn these items, they simple bought them. Using real cash =/= earned.
I don't care what people convice themselves.
12/01/2012 09:39 PMPosted by Deathsession
Man... I saw a guy driving a Ferrari on the other day. I hope the government strip his wealth so all of us can drive Ferraris, too!


FAIL.

I hate people who use this argument.

He EARNED that Ferrari IRL. He worked for a living, and was successful by his skills.

These people did NOT earn these items, they simple bought them. Using real cash =/= earned.
I don't care what people convice themselves.


fail.
how does one simply "earn" an item in this game? it's all NRG to find godlike items. buying the echoing fury is simply like buying a ferrari. i think it takes more "skills" to earn money irl to buy the items than it does to actually find the items. finding the items takes no skills. it's all luck.
11/30/2012 02:11 PMPosted by acrimonious
Going to be difficult to find much fun in competing against players with a lot more disposable income than the rest of us.

Competing.... what?
I just laugh at people like this. They're pathetic.
Easy solution if you don't wish what you post to be snipped:
1. bid = buyout
2. bid (lowest amount you are willing to take if sold)

If sold at bid price, quit complaining because it sold and Blizzard will send you IOU -- end of story...
He bought it for money not gold and should be banned for buying it outside rmah.

the man who payed 8000 dollars is going to have a 50/50 win loss percentage.

Hardly pay to win.


lol /thread
The pure idea of anyone spending what is currently $15,200 (40Billion at 38cents/million) on 1 item is insane, even a whole set of items, even on any game for anything, never mind to spend that on anything other than a Car or House is CRAZY!!!!!!!

- Apox187
No problem to throw away 10k USD which will do at least small active money. But item ingame? :) .. This reminds me... that I do the best, I do not use AH at all for my own progress/only ingame drops/, but have capped MF and legendaries/set items are raining to me like hell.. and yes, I use AH only to sell these items to guys like him and made some money, which I do not need. Do cash withdrawal all the time and I do not reinvest to my own character... do not like cheating AH game. :) bye guys
Not surprised at all.

That amount is small compared to players I know from certain popular MMO games, the amount spent by these players over the years is enough to buy a car or even amass a fortune.
So I'm the only one just thinking: It's a really bad weapon worth not even $250..?
FAIL.
I hate people who use this argument.
He EARNED that Ferrari IRL. He worked for a living, and was successful by his skills.
These people did NOT earn these items, they simple bought them. Using real cash =/= earned.
I don't care what people convice themselves.

LOL worst argument ever.
How to make sure it's not a scam? The buyer can transfer the money and never get the item from the seller.
Why does this matter?
12/01/2012 09:39 PMPosted by Deathsession
Man... I saw a guy driving a Ferrari on the other day. I hope the government strip his wealth so all of us can drive Ferraris, too!


FAIL.

I hate people who use this argument.

He EARNED that Ferrari IRL. He worked for a living, and was successful by his skills.

These people did NOT earn these items, they simple bought them. Using real cash =/= earned.
I don't care what people convice themselves.


And if the ferarri driver won the lottery? it's exacly like diablo lol. You have a chance at winning the lottery.

Just quit.
12/02/2012 06:56 AMPosted by Ritalynn


FAIL.

I hate people who use this argument.

He EARNED that Ferrari IRL. He worked for a living, and was successful by his skills.

These people did NOT earn these items, they simple bought them. Using real cash =/= earned.
I don't care what people convice themselves.


And if the ferarri driver won the lottery? it's exacly like diablo lol. You have a chance at winning the lottery.

Just quit.


FAIL. You're connecting LUCK to paying for an item. Paying for an item does not play a part there.

I could open my savings and blows 20k usd on Diablo3, does that mean I got lucky?

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