Its hard not think Matchmaking is rigged sometimes..

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I know that its not rigged, but its really hard to think it isnt sometimes.

Two days ago, I was playing Reno Mage. Out of 10 matches, I went against 8 Pirate Warrior / Shaman. I then switch to Control Shaman and my next 8 matches I didnt get a single aggro deck, was only Control matchups that I do horribly in.

Today, I have played at least 40 matches, how many Control warriors and Control Shamans did I see? None, literally. I decide to switch to Control Warrior myself, and then out of my first 6 matches, I get two Control Shamans, 1 Dragon Priest, 2 Pirate Warriors and 1 Control Warrior.

How does it always seem that when you switch decks to counter what you are facing, you literally stop facing those decks???

I just dont get it sometimes.
Just out of curiosity, how do you 'know' it's not rigged?
01/17/2017 01:43 PMPosted by IRopeIdiots
UP WITH THE FIRST AMMENDMENT

That's not how First Amendment works...Blizzard is not the US government.
01/17/2017 01:27 PMPosted by Deom
Two days ago, I was playing Reno Mage. Out of 10 matches, I went against 8 Pirate Warrior / Shaman.


Good for you! You had a favourable matchup in 8/10 matches! You must have been stoked!

01/17/2017 01:27 PMPosted by Deom
Today, I have played at least 40 matches, how many Control warriors and Control Shamans did I see? None, literally. I decide to switch to Control Warrior myself, and then out of my first 6 matches, I get two Control Shamans, 1 Dragon Priest, 2 Pirate Warriors and 1 Control Warrior.


So 3 really bad matchups, 2 really favourable matchups, and 1 neutral one. Sounds pretty decent. Seems to me your matchmaking is pretty good to you.
I was playing against a deck that relies on buffing cheap minions yesterday and I played against a Druid that had not one but two Keepers of the Grove. And then he used Madame Goya to shuffle one of the Keepers back into his deck and then he drew it the next turn and played it.

Needless to say, I lost. And it was on ladder, by the way!

Do I believe that the matchmaker was rigged? No, I understand that out of millions of people playing that I will occassionally go up against a deck that counters my deck very well. I just shrug and move on to the next game.
I saw this post last week, but didn’t have time to respond to it. I’ll do that now: when you go into a game, the only variable that affects who your opponent will be is your skill rating.

Matchmaking works as follows:

We use a formula to assess player skill. After every game, the formula looks at if you won or lost and uses your current rating, your opponent’s rating, and your rating history to generate your new rating. We call this rating MMR for short. In casual and at Legend rank, we pair players with similar MMRs. In Ranked below legend, we pair people with similar star ranks instead of similar MMRs. Your rating is the only input that the matchmaker receives. It doesn’t know what deck you’re playing, what deck you just played with or against, or anything else, except for your rating.

When you press ‘play’ you enter a queue for your chosen game mode. The matchmaker looks at your MMR and compares it to the MMR of everyone else in the queue. If it finds someone else with the same MMR as you, it pairs you into a game. If it doesn’t, it will wait a few seconds and look again. The second time, it doesn’t look just for someone with your MMR; it will also look for someone with an MMR that’s almost the same as yours. If it still doesn’t find a match, it waits another few seconds and looks again. The bound for what MMRs are considered a good match keep widening the longer you’re in the queue; this is to ensure that you don’t have to wait too long to play. Usually a match is found so quickly that the widening bounds never really matter. After the game, your rating is updated, and the process is repeated the next time you queue up.
Interresting !!

Thanks for the info
01/23/2017 09:56 AMPosted by Max McCall
I saw this post last week, but didn’t have time to respond to it. I’ll do that now: when you go into a game, the only variable that affects who your opponent will be is your skill rating.

Matchmaking works as follows:

We use a formula to assess player skill. After every game, the formula looks at if you won or lost and uses your current rating, your opponent’s rating, and your rating history to generate your new rating. We call this rating MMR for short. In casual and at Legend rank, we pair players with similar MMRs. In Ranked below legend, we pair people with similar star ranks instead of similar MMRs. Your rating is the only input that the matchmaker receives. It doesn’t know what deck you’re playing, what deck you just played with or against, or anything else, except for your rating.

When you press ‘play’ you enter a queue for your chosen game mode. The matchmaker looks at your MMR and compares it to the MMR of everyone else in the queue. If it finds someone else with the same MMR as you, it pairs you into a game. If it doesn’t, it will wait a few seconds and look again. The second time, it doesn’t look just for someone with your MMR; it will also look for someone with an MMR that’s almost the same as yours. If it still doesn’t find a match, it waits another few seconds and looks again. The bound for what MMRs are considered a good match keep widening the longer you’re in the queue; this is to ensure that you don’t have to wait too long to play. Usually a match is found so quickly that the widening bounds never really matter. After the game, your rating is updated, and the process is repeated the next time you queue up.


Thanks for the clarification Max. Any chance we get more insight on the formula? Decay or weightage for example? Do we get a penalty if we concede?
Show us the code then...
01/23/2017 10:20 AMPosted by Maximus
Show us the code then...
They're not going to show you their proprietary matchmaking code.
Guys, don't ask for the code... all it will cause is someone super bored to find a way to exploit it, and necessitate it being changed into something less tested. I'm happy with semi-vague... some secrets are better left kept.
01/23/2017 10:23 AMPosted by Reshyk
01/23/2017 10:20 AMPosted by Maximus
Show us the code then...
They're not going to show you their proprietary matchmaking code.


Then don't expect us to believe
01/23/2017 09:56 AMPosted by Max McCall
I saw this post last week, but didn’t have time to respond to it. I’ll do that now: when you go into a game, the only variable that affects who your opponent will be is your skill rating.

Matchmaking works as follows:

We use a formula to assess player skill. After every game, the formula looks at if you won or lost and uses your current rating, your opponent’s rating, and your rating history to generate your new rating. We call this rating MMR for short. In casual and at Legend rank, we pair players with similar MMRs. In Ranked below legend, we pair people with similar star ranks instead of similar MMRs. Your rating is the only input that the matchmaker receives. It doesn’t know what deck you’re playing, what deck you just played with or against, or anything else, except for your rating.

When you press ‘play’ you enter a queue for your chosen game mode. The matchmaker looks at your MMR and compares it to the MMR of everyone else in the queue. If it finds someone else with the same MMR as you, it pairs you into a game. If it doesn’t, it will wait a few seconds and look again. The second time, it doesn’t look just for someone with your MMR; it will also look for someone with an MMR that’s almost the same as yours. If it still doesn’t find a match, it waits another few seconds and looks again. The bound for what MMRs are considered a good match keep widening the longer you’re in the queue; this is to ensure that you don’t have to wait too long to play. Usually a match is found so quickly that the widening bounds never really matter. After the game, your rating is updated, and the process is repeated the next time you queue up.


Great to know. Thanks so much for the info, Max. Keep up the good work!
So, you guys will believe this without any proof ?
Good to know.
If you need hard proof for a video game in order to play it, then you might want to find new hobbies. This is not how the world of how games and business works.

Also, what would a company really have to gain by misdirection here?
01/23/2017 09:56 AMPosted by Max McCall
I saw this post last week, but didn’t have time to respond to it. I’ll do that now: when you go into a game, the only variable that affects who your opponent will be is your skill rating.

Matchmaking works as follows:

We use a formula to assess player skill. After every game, the formula looks at if you won or lost and uses your current rating, your opponent’s rating, and your rating history to generate your new rating. We call this rating MMR for short. In casual and at Legend rank, we pair players with similar MMRs. In Ranked below legend, we pair people with similar star ranks instead of similar MMRs. Your rating is the only input that the matchmaker receives. It doesn’t know what deck you’re playing, what deck you just played with or against, or anything else, except for your rating.

When you press ‘play’ you enter a queue for your chosen game mode. The matchmaker looks at your MMR and compares it to the MMR of everyone else in the queue. If it finds someone else with the same MMR as you, it pairs you into a game. If it doesn’t, it will wait a few seconds and look again. The second time, it doesn’t look just for someone with your MMR; it will also look for someone with an MMR that’s almost the same as yours. If it still doesn’t find a match, it waits another few seconds and looks again. The bound for what MMRs are considered a good match keep widening the longer you’re in the queue; this is to ensure that you don’t have to wait too long to play. Usually a match is found so quickly that the widening bounds never really matter. After the game, your rating is updated, and the process is repeated the next time you queue up.


Thanks, there should be a stickied thread with this info due to the large amount of people that think the game is rigged against them.
01/23/2017 10:33 AMPosted by Maximus
So, you guys will believe this without any proof ?
Good to know.


Of course everyone believes that, same as everyone believes you are an useless internet troll that has nothing better to do than spread baseless claims...

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