How Competitive Skill Rating Works

Competitive Discussion
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How do I maximize my Skill Rating?

In order:
1) Win games
2) If diamond or above, play a minimum of 4.67 games per week (starting one week after placements).
3) If platinum or below, perform well, statistics-wise, with the chosen hero.

In my last game, my Skill Rating went up/down by X. Why did this happen?

The details of Skill Rating (SR) movement in a match depends on whether a player wins or loses, the Match-making-rating (MMR) mismatch between the two teams, the mismatch between the player’s SR and MMR, whether a player is new, the player’s statistical performance, the player’s position on the ladder, and possible bugs. Add it all together and it is nearly impossible to determine why a player’s SR has a specific movement in a particular match. Sometimes over the course of twenty to one hundred matches it can be seen that one particular cause is dominant, but that often depends on careful data collection and some guesswork.

Introduction

The SR system is confusing, and a good overview does not appear to be available. The official overview (1) is incomplete and does not answer a number of common player questions and concerns. This information below is gathered from sporadic blue posts and developer update videos, and salted with my own experience and experiments, various forum threads, and watching streams. Note that since Blizzard does not give exact algorithms, I do have to fill in some gaps, or leave some items unknown. I will edit this post as information becomes available, or the SR system changes.

Ranks

< 500 Bronze, SR not listed
500-1499 Bronze
1500-1999 Silver
2000-2499 Gold
2500-2999 Platinum
3000-3499 Diamond
3500-3999 Master
4000-5000 Grandmaster
Top 500 players in region.

For season 3, the rank distribution was Bronze: 6%, Silver: 22%, Gold: 34%, Platinum: 23%, Diamond: 10%, Master: 3%, Grandmaster <1%. (3) Third-party sites such as masteroverwatch.com do not give reliable distributions because players have to actually log in to those sites for it to count the data. This skews those sites heavily toward higher ranked players.

As a player gains SR, he will be promoted to the next tier when appropriate. He will drop out of each tier as he loses rank. However, there is some loss protection for Diamond and below. After a loss (but not a win), the game will check to see what a player’s current tier and skill rating are. If his skill rating has not exceeded the minimum for his current tier for the past five games, he will be demoted (16). For Master and Grandmaster, a player will be demoted immediately if his skill rating is not high enough. Competitive point rewards are based on the highest rank achieved during the season (16). Ranks and SR are wiped each season (but not MMR, see below).

The top 500 leaderboard becomes available two weeks after season start. To be eligible, a player must have played at least 50 games that season, all from one region. However, there were several past seasons where the 50 game restriction was not enforced. For example, there was a player who finished in top 500 with only 17 games (Season 6, Americas, rank 498, in-game leaderboard). This appears to have been a bug that was silently created and fixed. The top 500 spray and icon are not awarded unless a player is in top 500 at the end of the season (18).

Matchmaking

Matchmaking is based on hidden match-making-rating (MMR), not SR (3, 22, 25). Competitive MMR is separate from the MMR of other modes (37). If a player has never played competitive, his initial competitive MMR is likely around 2500 (38, 39). For new players, MMR and SR are more volatile (35). So even though everyone starts around 2500, after 10 placement matches, there is a wide variation in initial placements. New account volatility rapidly decreases with every game played, but is still visible after initial placements are complete. There is indirect evidence (see the “Season Transitions” section, below) that average MMR movement for established accounts is 18.7. For active and established accounts, typical SR movement is 20-30.

With the exception of diamond+ players who have decayed (see below), MMR and SR are closely linked (21). The SR/MMR convergence is implemented by having each match pull SR in the direction of MMR. That is, if SR is lower than MMR, a player will win more SR than MMR on a win, and lose less SR than MMR on a loss. When I refer to an SR buff, this is how the buff is implemented (14).

The game uses MMR to determine whether a match is fair, and attempts to match teams such that the game is fair (each team has a 50% chance of winning). Upon victory, the winners receive a bump up in SR and MMR, and the losers get bumped down. At times (off peak-hours or very high/low rated players), finding a fair match will be impossible in a reasonable amount of time, and the match maker will match teams based on a best fit. However, note that if only very imbalanced matches are available (the infamous Brazilian six stack playing at 3 AM), then no match will be made and queue times will become extreme to infinite (3). The tuning for what is very imbalanced is a number that is not published and can change with time. In the middle ground, top (or bottom) players will have a longer, but not infinite queue, to attempt to find a better match (15).

If the match making algorithm determined before the game that it was not fair, the higher ranked team will receive less SR/MMR on a win, and lose more SR/MMR on a loss. The lower ranked team will receive more SR/MMR on a win, and lose less SR/MMR on a loss (2). This is standard for Elo (rating system from chess) type systems. Draws cause no change in SR and have an unknown effect on MMR.

In addition to Elo type effects for high rated players (in which they gain less SR/MMR because there are no fair matches available), there is an extra SR debuff for high ranked players to prevent them from getting to the SR limit of 5000. The concern here is that players would start to pile up at the limit of 5000 and break the leaderboard (35).

In addition to MMR, the match maker attempts to match on ping and group size (32) and to make matches reasonably quickly. (Jeff also mentions quarantining new players from the general population, but based on a reroll experiment I did I believe that that effect is entirely gone by the time a player is finished with his career competitive placements).

If the match-maker says most games are fair, then why are there so many stomps?

There are many reasons:

1) Overwatch, as a game, has a tendency to snowball. The winner of the first fight has an ultimate advantage that has a tendency to last the round. Losing teams tend to tilt and start playing poorly, which can continue in the same round and carry into the next round.

2) Random variables are random. Maybe a cat walked on a keyboard or someone fat fingered an ult (7). Maybe someone who has 99% up-time for their internet had their 1% failure that day. Maybe one team has all dps mains, and the other team is well balanced. MMR and predicted win percentage only has validity over many matches, not each individual match.

3) Not every player tries hard every match. Sometimes this is subtle, like playing with a beer or two too many. Sometimes it is less subtle, like practicing a hero a player is not good at, regardless of team comp or map.

4) Some players actively break the system, by either hard throwing, that is intentionally losing (as opposed to soft throwing as in item 3), playing on someone else's account to boost it, or other similar actions. These actions are bannable and should be reported when seen. Blizzard has promised to take stronger actions against this sort of thing (17). However, soft throwers and hard throwers can be difficult to distinguish, and Blizzard has to error on the side of caution to avoid banning the wrong people, so it will always be a problem. The in-game report UI, as well as a key blue post (36), give guidelines on what behavior is or is not bannable.

5) New accounts in general have less data and will have a less accurate MMR. There is no required minimum number of games to play, so new accounts can stay “new” for a very long time.

6) MMR itself is only approximate. See the section on “How Accurate is SR”, below and realize that MMR generally will have the same issues as SR, with respect to accuracy, except it is harder to measure what is going on with MMR.

Okay, stomps are going to happen, but why are there so many win/loss streaks? Shouldn’t a player’s SR/MMR be fairly stable once he gets to the proper rank?

Unfortunately, if the results for individual games have significantly random causes, it follows mathematically that frequent and long streaks will occur. I discuss this at length elsewhere (34).

If MMR are SR are so similar, why have both? Isn’t that unnecessarily confusing? Can’t we handle the problem of rank camping (see below) some other way?

In a word, yes. Here I’m going to engage in editorializing and reading between the lines of the blue posts. See this as my informed, but unverified, opinion. The real purpose of MMR is to provide Blizzard’s absolute best estimate of each player’s ability. However, since it is invisible to the players, Blizzard can change how it is calculated at any time and can have movements or changes that feel bad (22). The "unnecessary" placement matches for established players also give Blizzard an extra opportunity to mess with MMR and make it harder for the players to see what is going on. SR, on the other hand, is player facing, and subject to player psychology. Aside from players' tendency to over-react to every little thing, blizzard uses SR to influence player behavior (SR buff at the beginning of the season (now removed), SR penalty for leaving, SR penalty for being inactive) and to coddle players’ tender egos (22).

The good news is that as Blizzard is getting more confidence in the system, goofiness like this is slowly getting removed. Streak bonuses were removed. The knock down / build up in SR at the beginning of the season was removed. Performance modifiers are being dialed down. There may be some day in the future when Blizzard has enough confidence in MMR to make it public, and to abolish SR.

High win percentage debuff / Low win percentage buff

As mentioned, SR is pulled in the direction of MMR (21). There is evidence (29) that this leads to an unfortunate and unintended side effect: If SR is well above MMR because a player has won many more games than he’s lost, less SR than MMR will be gained on a win, and more SR than MMR will be lost on a loss. This is an SR debuff. At high win percentage, a player can gain up to 6 SR less on a win than he loses on a loss (29). The effect is expected to reverse at low win percentage (SR would be buffed). The effect goes away once a player’s win percentage gets near 50%. That is, the player’s MMR is not ruined for life.

Rank Decay

To prevent rank camping, for players ranked 3000 SR or higher, their rank will decay 25 SR per day if they do not play. Each game a player plays increases his buffer by 36 hours, to a maximum of one week (20). Each day a player’s decay buffer decreases by 24 hours. If it hits zero, decay starts. To determine how many games must be played per week to avoid decay, we can calculate (1 game / 36 hours) * (168 hours / week) = 4.67 games / week. This is slightly lower than the 5 games per week that was originally reported (15). To see if decay is imminent look on the right hand side of the information screen of the competitive play card. After returning from decay, the player will have a substantial SR buff (gain more SR from wins than he loses from loses) until he is back where he was (3). While decayed, a player’s MMR (and hence matchmaking) does not change (3). The decay clock doesn’t start until the player does his placement matches.

Performance Modifier

In platinum and below, SR/MMR gains are adjusted up or down based on the performance of the player. This is a minor factor (2). This is done based on a numerical comparison of measureable quantities such as elims, deaths, assists, damage blocks, ults cast, etc. between a given player and other players of that hero at that MMR (8). Generally it is assumed that the measured stats are those visible to the player, but that has never been confirmed by Blizzard. Most of the details of this implementation are fuzzy and not published (probably to reduce exploits). This performance measure is correlated but not identical to “on fire” calculations. “On fire” compares a player to his teammates, while SR/MMR bonuses compare a player to other players that are not in the current match, but in a similar skill bracket, and playing the same hero (8). The effect of the performance modifier is generally small, but there are plausible reports of it causing people to have to maintain a 55%+ win rate to maintain their SR (11).

This is the most controversial (among many controversies) part of the SR system. There are two camps, those who don’t want their SR/MMR to be so heavily influenced by those in their group, and those who worry that having a performance based system will cause people to not play the objectives / win conditions and instead go stat hunting. In addition to people who go stat hunting, people can unintentionally be at the wrong rank because their good / bad play is not reflected in their stats. In the early days, these groups were roughly equal, but lately those advocating for no performance modifier are more numerous.

Starting in season 8 (January 2018), the performance modifier was removed for diamond and above (35). Blizzard has started to realize that having a motivation other than winning causes all sorts of non-ideal behavior and effects. The immediate forum response has been to request this change for lower tiers as well (at least whatever tier the poster happens to be in). However performance modifiers do help move new players where they belong much faster than an Elo type system, so I propose that the performance modifier be removed for Bronze to Platinum players after a sufficient number of competitive games has been played. Blizzard can use their data to determine how long it takes for people for their rank to stabilize, which would be a good place for a cutoff.

Season Transitions

Players’ 10 placement matches will start with Blizzard’s best estimate of each player’s MMR for matchmaking purposes. A player’s initial SR will generally be close to his previous season ending SR, with a relatively ordinary adjustment based on 10 placement matches. However, occasionally a player will have a large and inexplicable movement (24) in either direction.

My best guess is that Blizzard is using the cover of placements to tweak their MMR algorithm. In addition, they likely reanalyze the entire previous season and place people again. This allows them (for example) to throw out games (for all players except the hard carry) where a person was later determined to be horribly misplaced and winning all their matches. It allows them to take into account stats with a full season worth of data, even though various heroes were tweaked during the season. Basically, Blizzard can use data from well after a match to determine who really should have won that match or what performance modifiers were appropriate.

I suspect (without proof) that unexplained variation is larger for accounts with few competitive games in recent history.

Without an official statement from Blizzard, or some method for reverse engineering what they are doing, it is difficult to be sure. It is also difficult to know how much data is included in this rebasing of MMR. Based on my experience (but not statistically significant data or blue posts), a player’s starting MMR depends on approximately one season or maybe 100-200 games of data.

Because of reasonably high quality data for seasons 6, 7, and 8 (24), it is possible to derive a formula: (New Season Starting SR) = (-180 +/- 24) + (1.006 +/- .007) * (Previous season Ending SR) + (37.3 +/- 2.6) * (Placement Wins). New Season Starting SR has a standard error of 181 SR (24), which implies an unexplained range of roughly 1000 SR.

I have several anecdotes (but not enough to call it data) that decay does not persist through season transitions. That is, if a player decays from 4000 to 3000 before the season break, he will place around 4000 after the season break.

Prior to season 6 (September 2017), players’ SR would be bumped down below their MMR at the beginning of the season, and they would earn it back with an SR buff over the course of 50 matches. This felt bad and was removed (15).

As an aside, it is possible from this data to derive the typical movement in MMR. It is safe to assume that the average SR of the entire community matches the average MMR of the entire community at the end of the season. It is also likely that the SR matches MMR exactly after placements. In theory, decayed players would mess with this, but they are not common in the data and decay likely persists through season breaks so would not affect the analysis here. Overall, during placements, movement of SR and MMR is the same. With each additional win (as opposed to a loss), a player gains 37.3 SR / MMR. This effectively means that a player will win 18.7 MMR on a win, and lose 18.7 MMR on a loss. This typical MMR movement likely continues for the whole season, not just placements, while SR movement is more typically 20 - 30. This matches our evidence from elsewhere (how SR buffs work, high win percentage debuff) that MMR moves slower than SR.

How accurate is SR?

On the forums there are generally two factions with respect to SR, those who think that SR is essentially luck and a meaningless value, and those who believe that SR is essentially correct. Neither of these factions have the correct approach. The correct question is to ask how accurate is SR? Clearly top 500 players are better than bottom 500 (see any bronze to GM series or watch low bronze play vs top play), so SR is not completely random, but how accurate is it really? For this discussion, I am assuming that we are talking about a player that plays to win every game, doesn’t share his account, and has played at least 100 competitive games.

There are number of ways to approach this question. One is to start a completely new account, and then play 100 games on the new account and see how it performs compared to the old one. This shows that SR can vary by 1000 SR in extreme cases, and 500 in normal cases (27). There is some evidence that reroll experiments show less variance at higher ranks (28) likely because there are less random variables, such as smurfs, throwers, and inconsistent play.

Another experiment we can do is look at how SR changes between seasons. Even though SR is generally about where it was from the previous season, there is roughly a 1000 SR range (in extreme cases) that cannot be explained by previous season ending and placements record (see previous section). Regardless of where this comes from, this implies that SR is not particularly accurate.

Next, any player can see how his SR changes during a season. A range of 500 is completely normal here.

In addition, if an account needs a 55% win rate to maintain SR (11), and if win % changes slowly with rank, then it is expected that this will be an additional source of significant error in SR.

If a player gets noticeably better, it can take a long time to get to the correct rank. If a player maintains a 55% win rate, he will only go up approximately 220 SR/MMR every 100 games. Because there are twelve players in a match, one player's contribution (and ability to carry the match) is limited unless he is playing at a vastly different skill level, so a 55% win rate for a player that is moderately under placed is to be expected.

Put this all together, and we can state that an active and motivated player’s SR is only accurate to +/- 250 SR in normal circumstances and +/- 500 SR in extreme cases. Of course, new players or players that actively break the system can be off by much more.

Popular Myths

Forced 50/50

There is an old and persistent conspiracy theory that Blizzard’s algorithms force players to have a 50% win rate by nefarious means (if a player gets many wins in a row, very poor players are put on his team to make him lose). This has been contradicted by Blizzard (7), is contradicted by people’s ability to climb (13), and would be a horrible and difficult-to-implement design. The truth is much simpler. If a player wins more than he loses, his SR/MMR goes up. As it rises, he is placed against stronger opponents (and with stronger allies), which increases the chance that he will lose (7). Once in equilibrium, the average person he faces (and is allied with) is at his skill level, and the only way to go up is to become a better player. The win/loss patterns and streaks are fully consistent (in the mathematical sense) with the system as Blizzard describes it, and are not consistent with a system in which Blizzard forces wins and losses (34).

MMR is determined by statistical performance

The idea here is that a player’s MMR is really a summary of their statistical performance, and that because SR chases MMR (14), a player’s SR is basically determined by their statistical performance. If this were true, statistical performance would be, by far, the most important contribution to SR. This is contradicted by Blizzard (2) and by most players having a win percentage of about 50% (if statistical performance was weighted very heavily, stat-chasers would have much higher SR than team-players, for example).

Matchmaking pushes a 50% win percentage using broken criteria

It varies what this broken criteria is. Recent win percentage is popular. For example, a 75% win percentage player would be matched with a 25% win percentage player (on the same team). Another popular one is that a high stats player would be matched with a low stats player. The theories typically have a few things in common:

1) Blizzard has never confirmed (and sometimes has denied) them.
2) They would lead to obviously broken matchmaking.
3) Their proponents never have solid data backing them up.
4) They usually are not compatible with Blizzard statements, “All the system does when it comes to matching on skill is attempt to match you with people of a similar number” (32), and “We use MMR for matchmaking, not SR” (25).

The supposed support for these theories are that Blizzard has indicated that they desire and are happy with a 50% win percentage (32). However, there are many ways of accomplishing a 50% win percentage, and much better ways than the theories these forum writers ascribe to. Specifically, a 50% win percentage can be accomplished using a procedure similar to that which Blizzard describes (7): As a player wins matches, he is placed with and against stronger players. As he loses matches, he is placed with and against weaker players. With time, his win rate will converge to 50%, with some random oscillation around 50%. If he gets better (compared to the rest of the community), his win percentage will go up a bit until he finds his new level.

Win Streak Bonus / Loss Streak Penalty

Prior to April, 2017 there was a substantial bonus to SR for winning many games in a row (about 4 or more), scaling all the way up to 150 SR for one win. To keep things balanced, penalties existed if a player lost many games in a row. This was removed because it lead to people who got lucky/unlucky being thrown far from their true rank (9, 10).

Leaver Penalty

Each time a player leaves competitive matches any time before the Victory/Defeat screen, he will receive a 50 SR penalty. It is not known if leaving penalizes players’ MMR. In addition, a leaver will receive increasing automatic bans, with each leave (19):

10 minutes
30 minutes
2 hours
8 hours
24 hours
Season Ban (with a season ban, no rewards are received)

The season ban cannot be reversed. The reason or method of leaving is irrelevant. If a player plays many games without leaving, the leaving penalty resets downward. The rule of thumb is that if the bans are getting into 8 or 24 hours, a season ban is imminent. If a player receives three season bans, a permanent ban is likely (30). The season bans do not need to be consecutive to count toward a permanent ban.

Bugs

Because of the complexity of the system, subtle bugs with skill-rating and match-making can be difficult to spot and reproduce by the players. And many player reports are not particularly trustworthy for various reasons. However, there are some outstanding issues which are well-known and verified.

There are a number of reports of a bug that will cause people to have very small gains / large losses in the match after the match with a leaver (26), assuming the bugged player left after the game said it was safe to do so, but before the end of the match. To avoid this, never leave a match, even after the game says it is safe to do so. There are also a number of people who a have reported small gains or large losses without any leavers in the vicinity, so we do not entirely understand what is going on. However, Blizzard has said that there is a fix in the works (33) (or already done?) so we shall see.

There is a rare and serious bug in which players can get incorrectly season banned and lose huge and undeserved amounts of SR. It appears that what happens is a competitive game gets put in a “Waiting for Players” state. And each time the game restarts with new players, everyone loses 50 SR and gets an increasing ban, up to hundreds of SR and a season ban. Blizzard has acknowledged the problem, is working on it, and has promised restoration to affected players (31). However, restoration can be slow and painful. If you ever see “Waiting for Players” during a competitive match, you should exit by any means necessary to stop the bleeding.

Using statistical measures to rate players is particularly prone to subtle bugs (11), which Blizzard and players have been discovering and Blizzard has been (slowly) acknowledging, fixing, and re-implementing since launch.

References

(1) https://playoverwatch.com/en-us/blog/21363037
(2) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20749737390#post-3
(3) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20753625906 “If you do decay, it only affects your current displayed skill rating. This decay does not affect the internal matchmaking rating we use, so we can still place you in fair matches.” Unfortunately, the developers have a strong tendency to be sloppy with their language with respect to SR and MMR, which can lead to contradictory statements. Sometimes it looks like matchmaking is based on SR, and sometimes it looks like matchmaking is based on MMR. I decide in favor of matchmaking being based on MMR, not SR, because master+ players regularly see decayed “diamond” players in their matches. And when someone like Seagull decays down to diamond on stream, he is still placed in grandmaster / top 500 matches.
(4) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20753625906#post-5
(5) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20753625906#post-14
(6) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20753475372
(7) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20753625906#post-13
(8) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20754415323?page=1#post-1
(9) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20754005467#post-1
(10) Stevo, a twitch streamer and Symmetra main did a bronze to gm series on twitch after these changes went into effect, and there was no detectable SR bonus, even though he won 51 matches in a row. https://www.twitch.tv/videos/149357127 and following.
(11) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20759406493
(13) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20758756012?page=1
(14) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20753625906 “When you do come back and actively play matches, you’ll also typically gain more SR from a win until your displayed skill rating and internal matchmaking have again reached ‘equilibrium’ “.
(15) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jqf0e8zzyCw
(16) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20758826275
(17) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20758356169
(18) https://playoverwatch.com/en-us/blog/20580588
(19) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20753269323
(20) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20758787028
(21) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20758686566#post-6
(22) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20758686566#post-16
(24) https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1kyS5EL9ZK1mQO6dfCuJGYp66-uYVL78VREh_6GBC4kQ/edit?usp=sharing
(25) https://twitter.com/playoverwatch/status/850435344457543680?lang=en Note however, that the second sentence, “Also players’ displayed icon …” is no longer valid. Players’ icons now change as a player loses SR.
(26) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20759096240
(27) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20758807010
(28) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20758807010#post-10
(29) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20759236122
(30) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20759266236
(31) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20759216554?page=8#post-142
(32) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20745504371#post-3
(33) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20757486337#post-5
(34) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20759379305
(35) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20759648155
(36) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20760716149?page=1#post-10
(37) https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20760837867#post-3
(38) https://www.reddit.com/r/Competitiveoverwatch/comments/7njxeu/question_about_qp_vs_comp_mmr/ds2oy62/
(39) https://www.reddit.com/r/Competitiveoverwatch/comments/7njxeu/question_about_qp_vs_comp_mmr/ds2wz1k/

Last edited on 1/15/2018
Very good write up. Can't say much about it, except that it needs to be sticky.
Thanks. I've made some edits for grammar and clarity.
The matchmaking section needs to be made more clear about which mode you're talking about at the start. you're talk about QP at the start but do not say that.

Rank Decay needs to be more clear on the conditions for when the decay start (after a week with less than 7 games) in the first sentence.
I understand this but just wait until all the low rank plebs see this they start saying " my mmr is at least master but I'm in silver because my dps can't kill things" "I'm playing mercy and I almsor for 3 2 man rezzes I only got 13 sr for that"
08/21/2017 10:17 PMPosted by Metsik
The matchmaking section needs to be made more clear about which mode you're talking about at the start. you're talk about QP at the start but do not say that.

Rank Decay needs to be more clear on the conditions for when the decay start (after a week with less than 7 games) in the first sentence.


Thanks. I rewrote/edited those two sections.
Round of applause, however there is some MAJOR misinformation in your guide.

1. Matchmaking is based on hidden match-making-rating (MMR), not SR - no its not. The absolute initial filter to matchmaking (creating teams) is your formal SR. If you are deranked master with 2000SR you will play with other 2000SRs. There are some exceptions (like high tier games where the system cannot find enough players) and MMR also has its role in some "additional" balancing of the teams, but the first and foremost factor is your SR. Its simple and obvious.

2. Before playing competitive, a new player can estimate what his competitive MMR will be by looking at the career profiles of his opponents in quick play. While its true for normal players, smurf accounts have its own specific and can rise greatly during placement matches if they get consequent wins.

3. For players that have played many games of competitive in a particular season, SR matches competitive MMR closely . Not guaranteed. To rephrase it, over the hundreds of games you'll end up where you belong (MMR-wise)... well, if you actually tried to. It doesnt take into account derankers, boosters or people who simply start learning new characters. Sometimes, large lose- or win- streaks based on pure luck can also get a decent impact on your SR at given moment.

4. The SR/MMR convergence is implemented by having each match pull SR in the direction of MMR. That is, if SR is lower than MMR, a player will win more SR than MMR on a win, and lose less SR than MMR on a loss. Now, thats but a theory. Officially, it works a lil different - your perfomance regarding "average" results on the same hero at your SR are checked, and if you perform way better, you'll get more SR, and vice-versa.

5. Upon victory, the winners receive a bump up in SR and MMR Again, just a pure theory. I dont think anything but your perfomance (which migh include winrate on certein hero, though) actually increases your hidden MMR. Too bad devs will never uncover the details :)

6. In addition, players’ SR will be bumped down “a bit” from their MMR. As was already stated numerous times, thats not the rule, you might retain your SR or even boost it with placements, depending on your final SR and perfomance.

7. there will be an SR buff (gain more SR on a win than lose on a loss) until the player has played 40-50 games. Actually, WAY less than 50 games.

8. After returning from decay, the player will have a substantial SR buff (gain more SR from wins than he loses from loses) until he is back where he was. No. But it might seem this way since he's most likely to perform better if he's actually 3500 and not 3000 :)

9. While decayed, a player’s MMR (and hence matchmaking) does not change While MMR doesnt change, SR does, so he'll get matches with his SR. So fully decayed grandmaster will get placed in, say, 3200 game (and i've seen a fair share of this myself). Its also worth mention that decay doesnt affect your calibration start. I mean, if you went inactive and decayed from 3800 to 3000, you'll still be able to calibrate to like 3600 or whatever in the next season.

10. “On fire” compares you to your teammates Jesus, no, "on fire" serves a different purpose, works on certain numbers which are added by certain abilities and factors, and has nothing to do with it.

11. The effect of the performance modifier is generally small. The effect of the perfomance modifier is what allows smurfs to get to 3500SR on fresh account by playing symmetra only for 5-6 hourse total. Although it used to be way greater back when old win/lose streak system was in place and gm smurfs were getting like +150SR per single win in plat. I mean, your MMR = your perfomance overtime, so if its same person playing (not boosting) you might just say its almost a same thing.
08/22/2017 09:09 AMPosted by BOO
Round of applause, however there is some MAJOR misinformation in your guide.


Thanks. However, I suspect that you either didn't read the references, or don't believe blue posts. I trust blue posts unless they are contradicted by later blue posts, or with VERY well documented player data.

08/22/2017 09:09 AMPosted by BOO
1. Matchmaking is based on hidden match-making-rating (MMR), not SR - no its not. The absolute initial filter to matchmaking (creating teams) is your formal SR. If you are deranked master with 2000SR you will play with other 2000SRs. There are some exceptions (like high tier games where the system cannot find enough players) and MMR also has its role in some "additional" balancing of the teams, but the first and foremost factor is your SR. Its simple and obvious.


https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20753625906#post-1

"The decay does affect the internal matchmaking that we use, so we can still place you in fair matches" - Scott Mercer

08/22/2017 09:09 AMPosted by BOO
2. Before playing competitive, a new player can estimate what his competitive MMR will be by looking at the career profiles of his opponents in quick play. While its true for normal players, smurf accounts have its own specific and can rise greatly during placement matches if they get consequent wins.


New accounts SR are more fluid generally. I left this out. Perhaps I should add it in. However, when a top 500 try-hards on new account, they are placed quite highly from their first competitive match. I have a post somewhere that discusses this, but it would take some work to find.

08/22/2017 09:09 AMPosted by BOO
3. For players that have played many games of competitive in a particular season, SR matches competitive MMR closely . Not guaranteed. To rephrase it, over the hundreds of games you'll end up where you belong (MMR-wise)... well, if you actually tried to. It doesnt take into account derankers, boosters or people who simply start learning new characters. Sometimes, large lose- or win- streaks based on pure luck can also get a decent impact on your SR at given moment.


Okay, you're mixing up two concepts here. One is whether SR/MMR are similar after many matches. I assert this without proof. The other is whether SR/MMR accurately represent a players true ability. That is a different point that I haven't addressed, but plan to in the future.

08/22/2017 09:09 AMPosted by BOO
4. The SR/MMR convergence is implemented by having each match pull SR in the direction of MMR. That is, if SR is lower than MMR, a player will win more SR than MMR on a win, and lose less SR than MMR on a loss. Now, thats but a theory. Officially, it works a lil different - your perfomance regarding "average" results on the same hero at your SR are checked, and if you perform way better, you'll get more SR, and vice-versa.

5. Upon victory, the winners receive a bump up in SR and MMR Again, just a pure theory. I dont think anything but your perfomance (which migh include winrate on certein hero, though) actually increases your hidden MMR. Too bad devs will never uncover the details :)


Performance officially includes both wins (large factor) and stats (small factor) .

08/22/2017 09:09 AMPosted by BOO
6. In addition, players’ SR will be bumped down “a bit” from their MMR. As was already stated numerous times, thats not the rule, you might retain your SR or even boost it with placements, depending on your final SR and perfomance.


Your SR is bumped down a bit from your MMR at the end of placements. https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20753625906#post-5 If you ace your placements, your MMR can go up enough that your new SR will be higher than your season ending SR. This is rare though.

08/22/2017 09:09 AMPosted by BOO
7. there will be an SR buff (gain more SR on a win than lose on a loss) until the player has played 40-50 games. Actually, WAY less than 50 games.


https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20753625906#post-14 This also agrees with my own data (two accounts for two seasons).

08/22/2017 09:09 AMPosted by BOO
8. After returning from decay, the player will have a substantial SR buff (gain more SR from wins than he loses from loses) until he is back where he was. No. But it might seem this way since he's most likely to perform better if he's actually 3500 and not 3000 :)


https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20753625906
"When you do come back and actively play matches, you'll also typically gain more SR from a win until your displayed skill rating and internal matchmaking rating have again reached 'equilibrium'. " - Scott Mercer

08/22/2017 09:09 AMPosted by BOO
9. While decayed, a player’s MMR (and hence matchmaking) does not change While MMR doesnt change, SR does, so he'll get matches with his SR. So fully decayed grandmaster will get placed in, say, 3200 game (and i've seen a fair share of this myself). Its also worth mention that decay doesnt affect your calibration start. I mean, if you went inactive and decayed from 3800 to 3000, you'll still be able to calibrate to like 3600 or whatever in the next season.

10. “On fire” compares you to your teammates Jesus, no, "on fire" serves a different purpose, works on certain numbers which are added by certain abilities and factors, and has nothing to do with it.


https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20754415323?page=1#post-1

08/22/2017 09:09 AMPosted by BOO
11. The effect of the performance modifier is generally small. The effect of the perfomance modifier is what allows smurfs to get to 3500SR on fresh account by playing symmetra only for 5-6 hourse total. Although it used to be way greater back when old win/lose streak system was in place and gm smurfs were getting like +150SR per single win in plat. I mean, your MMR = your perfomance overtime, so if its same person playing (not boosting) you might just say its almost a same thing.


Stevo, a twitch streamer and Symmetra main did a bronze to gm series on twitch after the win streak bonuses were removed, and there was no detectable SR bonus, even though he won more than 40 matches in a row. I think he was gold or plat at that point. If there was a substantial performance modifier, he should should have shot up much faster. https://www.twitch.tv/videos/149357127 and following
I've updated the post to reflect the season six changes in https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jqf0e8zzyCw
I've updated the post to reflect the season six changes in https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20758826275

Also, note that Boo's post is largely irrelevant at this point, as much of it is arguing about old news.
Dunno who the hell is downvoting you.

Good write up that is actually substantiated by evidence.

Agree that it should be sticked. Provides an easy reference for quotes from blizzard.
08/23/2017 09:55 PMPosted by Kaawumba
I've updated the post to reflect the season six changes in https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20758826275.

Also, note that Boo's post is largely irrelevant at this point, as it is arguing about old news.

The link provided is broken.
How nice of you to provide this. Thank you.
Biggest question about forced 50/50.

Now lets assume that what you say about MMR is completely true - you climb higher as you go, get matched with better people (on both teams) shouldn't the games just continue being competitive?

Now, I am not saying yes or no here, but getting games that are hilariously one sided seems like the system is not working correctly. If it was working correctly you'd have a roughly even match up as you continue climbing where you get matched with and against better people.

Going from a balanced and communicative team after a hard fought win (like 3-2+99% overtime) to a team with a smurf practicing genji, widow that couldn't hit Earth while standing on it, and then 3 other people who are trying to salvage the game is questionable at best because how did that Widow and Genji even end up here in the first pace?

Unless of course the system is completely f'd up the a which is the only explanation I can come up with without Blizzard giving me some source code.

tl;dr: I'm not saying that forced 50% winrate is a thing, rather that the sorting system is dumb.
08/23/2017 10:06 PMPosted by Fershizzy
Dunno who the hell is downvoting you.

Good write up that is actually substantiated by evidence.

Agree that it should be sticked. Provides an easy reference for quotes from blizzard.


Thanks. Unless the down voters post, it is difficult to be sure, but I suspect there are several categories. 1) Those who follow some fan theory that has no support, which I contradict. Sometimes these are conspiracy theories, but sometimes they are just wrong. 2) Those that don't believe blue posts. They usually believe conspiracy theories. 3) Those who don't like the system. They down vote me as a proxy for down voting Blizzard.
08/23/2017 10:08 PMPosted by Fershizzy
I've updated the post to reflect the season six changes in https://us.battle.net/forums/en/overwatch/topic/20758826275.

Also, note that Boo's post is largely irrelevant at this point, as it is arguing about old news.

The link provided is broken.


Fixed. Thanks. There was a period that was confusing it.
08/23/2017 10:52 PMPosted by Nex
Biggest question about forced 50/50.

Now lets assume that what you say about MMR is completely true - you climb higher as you go, get matched with better people (on both teams) shouldn't the games just continue being competitive?

Now, I am not saying yes or no here, but getting games that are hilariously one sided seems like the system is not working correctly. If it was working correctly you'd have a roughly even match up as you continue climbing where you get matched with and against better people.

Going from a balanced and communicative team after a hard fought win (like 3-2+99% overtime) to a team with a smurf practicing genji, widow that couldn't hit Earth while standing on it, and then 3 other people who are trying to salvage the game is questionable at best because how did that Widow and Genji even end up here in the first pace?

Unless of course the system is completely f'd up the a which is the only explanation I can come up with without Blizzard giving me some source code.

tl;dr: I'm not saying that forced 50% winrate is a thing, rather that the sorting system is dumb.


This is a good question. I have added a section addressing it at the end of the match-making section, above.
I can perform well every game but it doesn't matter if i lose this "Skill Rating" tries telling me i'm bad by lowering. Weird system, trash system, bad design #blizzardgaming lul
Nice write up and on the references. Agreed this should be a sticky.
Matchmaking is based on hidden match-making-rating (MMR), not SR (3)


He's talking about decayed matchmaking. If you were 4000 and dropped down to 3500 you'd still be placed with people in the 4000 range.

There is, currently, no evidence that normal matchmaking works off MMR. If it did we would see people fighting others with a much wider breadth than we see below 3000.

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