What's the plural of "loot"?

General Discussion
Is it also, "loot"?
Usually, loot refers to many items. So i'd say yes.

But 'loots' is fun. Like 'stuffs'.
Are you referring to multiple items of loot or multiple instances of looting?
Yes.

You coulasaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
Loot by itself is already plural.

noun
1.
spoils or plunder taken by pillaging, as in war.
2.
anything taken by dishonesty, force, stealth, etc.:
"a burglar's loot."
3.
a collection of valued objects:
"The children shouted and laughed as they opened their Christmas loot."
4.
Slang. money:
"You'll have a fine time spending all that loot."
5.
act of looting or plundering:
"to take part in the loot of a conquered city."
verb (used with object)
6.
to carry off or take (something) as loot:
"to loot a nation's art treasures."
7.
to despoil by taking loot; plunder or pillage (a city, house, etc.), as in war.
8.
to rob, as by burglary or corrupt activity in public office:
"to loot the public treasury."
verb (used without object)
9.
to take loot; plunder:
"The conquerors looted and robbed."
hmm, Multiple Loot is Loot, got it.

sorry brain hiccup.
"Phat Loots"
Leet.
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Its Lootz, with a z, that way they know you mean it.
Loot, more loot, and lots of loot. It's both singular and plural, kind of like fish. One fish, two fish, three fish.
05/13/2014 07:08 PMPosted by Rygarius
kind of like fish
my fish will not simply fish up

do you think i like healing without a fish as my MH? no i feel incomplete but rng is the devil

nerf fish
Lewts. Used in a sentence:

"Did you see what dropped off Garrosh? Those were some phat lewts!"
05/13/2014 07:13 PMPosted by Hortheforde
Lewts. Used in a sentence:

"Did you see what dropped off Garrosh? Those were some phat lewts!"


I thought that form used a 'z'.
Can we just call it booty?
05/13/2014 07:08 PMPosted by Rygarius
Loot, more loot, and lots of loot. It's both singular and plural, kind of like fish. One fish, two fish, three fish.
No no no... it's
One fish, two fish. Red fish, blue fish.
05/13/2014 07:08 PMPosted by Rygarius
Loot, more loot, and lots of loot. It's both singular and plural, kind of like fish. One fish, two fish, three fish.

Technically, that's only true if they're all the same species of fish. When talking about different species, it's "fishes" :) (The More You Know)
05/13/2014 07:15 PMPosted by Adelphie
Can we just call it booty?


... I like booty.

>_>

<_<

... yes, I really like booty.
In linguistics, a mass noun or uncountable noun is a noun with the syntactic property that any quantity of it is treated as an undifferentiated unit, rather than as something with discrete subsets. Non-count nouns are distinguished from count nouns.

Given that different languages have different grammatical features, the actual test for which nouns are mass nouns may vary between languages. In English, mass nouns are characterized by the fact that they cannot be directly modified by a numeral without specifying a unit of measurement, and that they cannot combine with an indefinite article (a or an). Thus, the mass noun "water" is quantified as "20 litres of water" while the count noun "chair" is quantified as "20 chairs". However, both mass and count nouns can be quantified in relative terms without unit specification (e.g., "much water," "so many chairs").

Some mass nouns can be used in English in the plural to mean "more than one instance (or example) of a certain sort of entity"—for example, "Many cleaning agents today are technically not soaps, but detergents." In such cases they no longer play the role of mass nouns, but (syntactically) they are treated as count nouns.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_noun
Stuffs, junks, and items...

But loot is loot and thus my point is moot.
plural of loot is l33t

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