All in one pc

Games, Gaming and Hardware
I'm curious if anyone here on the forums plays WoW on an all in one pc. If you do, which company did you go with? Do they perform well? What framerate are you getting in game?What are the temps like? The reason I ask is because I could use the space saving feature of an all in one by mounting it to my wall.
Well all in one PCs still have a hardware specs too and the same logic on what parts to look for in a laptop or desktop holds true to all in one PCs too. The main 2 things to look at is CPU and video card. After that then Ram and Storage are the 2nd thing to look at.

For CPU it should be a Ryzen CPU or a Intel Skylake or kabylake that is 3.4GHz or higher. For video card it should be a GTX 1050/RX 460 or higher. WoW is very CPU dependant and what you should focus on is single core speed, number of cores won't matter for wow. If it's the latest generation of Intel or AMD get the highest GHz you can get but if it's an outdated CPU like a FX-6300 or similar generation APU move along....

Second is ram. For ram 8GB is considered minimal today and 16GB is future proofing yourself if all you do is game. For Intel ram speed does not scale well for performance and for AMD ram speed does scale better but it's not night and day difference. For example on Intel you will be fine with DDR4-2400 and on Ryzen you want to be around DDR4-2667 to 3200. If the CPU does not take DDR4 and wants DDR3 instead then move along its an old CPU.

Finally for storage, consider what you have on your PC now and what you plan to store on it. SSDs are highly recommended for quality of life when using a PC and ideally will be large enough to hold windows+all your programs+your most played games. Mechanical HDDs are great for your less played games and bulk storage and if you run out of room in your AIO PC then external HDDs or even network storage over another PC may help too.

For example of this my main gaming/workstation PC has its main drive as a 512GB SSD and I got 3x 3TB HDDs for bulk storage. My home theater PC only runs a 120GB SSD and I only am using under half its space. I do have a massive TV show and movie database on my main PC and I can access it over the network to my HTPC so I don't need much storage in that.
I used one for about a year but it had problems with overheating.
Some don't completely suck, look at this one:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4NM-UAL1po
Do keep in mind that some all-in-one systems (particularly those which are mounted to the back of a monitor) are essentially laptop hardware without the battery. While they may feature slightly less power management stuff to reduce performance, laptop parts - even without power restrictions - are still quite a ways behind their desktop counterparts.

The video Connoisseur linked even mentions this, and specifically outlines that the system being demonstrated is fairly atypical in that it features full desktop-class hardware (uITX motherboard, PCIe extension to horizontally mount the graphics card, CLC cooling and an STX PSU). That puts it worlds ahead of many other similar systems - not just in terms of initial performance, but also in terms of cooling (it's compressed but not nearly as much as a laptop) and upgrade potential.
There have been some very compact pc builds posted here that could be easily wall mounted along with your choice of monitor.
If space is your main concern, you might look into that option.
If you want a wall mount pc... they have those. Thermaltake core P1 (itx) P3, or the monster P5.

If you want small footprint pc, you can build an ITX form factor pc. It takes a bit more research as to what parts to order though... but examples are abundant.

Itx:
Fractal node 202
Silverstone ml08 or rvz01
Cooler master elite 130
Fractal define nano s

If you want a full size PC, a lot of HTPC cases these days are quite nice, though they tend to be a bit more expensive. They afford lots of room to work with.

ATX:
Silverstone Grandia series
Fractal node 605

Alternatively, if you are good/adventurous at case modding, you could always get a 4u server case and make it work with a wall mount rack...
08/28/2017 09:22 AMPosted by Asterchades
Do keep in mind that some all-in-one systems (particularly those which are mounted to the back of a monitor) are essentially laptop hardware without the battery. While they may feature slightly less power management stuff to reduce performance, laptop parts - even without power restrictions - are still quite a ways behind their desktop counterparts.

The video Connoisseur linked even mentions this, and specifically outlines that the system being demonstrated is fairly atypical in that it features full desktop-class hardware (uITX motherboard, PCIe extension to horizontally mount the graphics card, CLC cooling and an STX PSU). That puts it worlds ahead of many other similar systems - not just in terms of initial performance, but also in terms of cooling (it's compressed but not nearly as much as a laptop) and upgrade potential.

At my work they used to have a bunch of those all in one PC's (with the PC hardware mounted to the back of the monitor). They overheated all the time, and hard drive failures were about 20x more common (due to bad design causing overheating). They were HP's.
08/29/2017 04:36 AMPosted by Vralok
They were HP's.


And that is their problem, they bought a touchsmart from HP.

A mini ITX build would do great too for space savings, if OP would post a budget I would see what I could put together for him.
If they were indeed HP TouchSmarts, that explains a lot. They're laptop-component-based, and look to have similar considerations made for cooling. Problem is that laptops don't tend to have the screen heat venting into the main chassis, in addition to their already generally pretty woeful system cooling ability, nor do they generally have onboard power transformers.

If the pictures I'm seeing are right, those HPs have a sum total of 2 fans: one for the CPU (maybe 80mmx15mm), one for... something else, possibly a GPU (60mmx15mm if it's lucky); and both of them look like low-fin-count, "quiet" type radials. Everything else - including drives and PSU - is left to fend with nothing more than passive flow from convection, which amounts to 3/10 of stuff all even with decently sized vents (which the HP lacks).

No wonder they failed... the hardware, I mean. That there's so many different models clearly suggests the product line didn't.
One of the easiest ITX cases to build in would be the Fractal Design Define Nano S case. Its one of the larger itx cases out there but it's still really tiny and can fit easily on even a student desk in a dorm. If you want you can easily mount a shelf on the wall to sit the case on as a DYI project and have the side window in the open to view the awesomeness inside.

If you want to measure out the size of the case its (WxHxD): 203 x 330 x 400mm. In inches it will be 8" x 13" x 15 3/4". Its height and depth is 1" by 3 3/4" larger than the original PS4 with its width being 6" wider. Even though it is one of the larger ITX cases it's still really small.

I put together 2 rough builds as ideas on what you can have in these PCs and still be able to upgrade in the future and have great cooling too:

Intel:
PCPartPicker part list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/fVB7xY
Price breakdown by merchant: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/fVB7xY/by_merchant/

CPU: Intel - Core i5-7600K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($222.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - MasterLiquid 120 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock - Fatal1ty Z270 Gaming-ITX/ac Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard ($155.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($147.88 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Western Digital - Blue 500GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($149.88 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB Mini Video Card ($428.89 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Fractal Design - Define Nano S Mini ITX Desktop Case ($54.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: SeaSonic - 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($53.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $1273.61
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-08-29 19:18 EDT-0400


AMD:
PCPartPicker part list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/rqhdkT
Price breakdown by merchant: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/rqhdkT/by_merchant/

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($197.43 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - MasterLiquid 120 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock - AB350 Gaming-ITX/ac Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard ($108.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($147.88 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Western Digital - Blue 500GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($149.88 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB Mini Video Card ($428.89 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Fractal Design - Define Nano S Mini ITX Desktop Case ($54.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: SeaSonic - 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($53.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $1202.04
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-08-29 19:18 EDT-0400


To be continued on a 2nd post......
The only difference between the 2 builds is CPU and motherboard. The same logic applies to the advice I gave on my first reply to this thread. Solid CPU, the Intel one will do better frames because it can overclock and get faster single core speed than the AMD. The AMD still can overclock and game really well but with 6 cores 12 threads it will make a beast starter to content creation and future proofing yourself a bit better.

For video card I selected a GTX 1070 as its an awesome 1440p gaming card so you can pair it with a nice display. Ram I selected 16GB for future proofing. For storage I set in a 500gb SSD that is an M.2 one that can sit behind the motherboard for zero cable management need. Added a fully modular PSU for better cable management, leave out the cables you are not using. Cooler choice was a budget AIO that does decently and should be easy to install in that case.

If you never built a PC before it may be too much to build in a node 202 or other similar PC case with the extra attention needed to build order and cable management. The Nano S builds much like larger desktops and be much easier to get into for novice builders.

There are more ways to tailor a build for someone and it is better if we know a budget so we can find the best hardware for the price. If you do get an all in one PC get one like in that video of Jays2cents and avoid HP touchsmarts like the plague.

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