Books that you could not finish

Movies, TV and Entertainment
Most of the times you start to read a book you read from beginning to end.But some time you just pick a book you want to read but you just cant finish for one reason or another. The story bogs down to a crawl. The story may piss you off. It my not make a damn bit of sense. Maybe its too long.
One book I could not finish was Les Mis. after about 50 or so pages on the battle of Waterloo, I just flat out gave up set the book down and said nope. What about you guys?
Angels in America, not really a book but a play assigned as reading material. So much gay propaganda it was the only time i turned to the internet for cliff notes.
Now that I can no longer read for pleasure and listen to audio books instead, I don't finish a lot of books. Audio books simply take twice as long (or longer) for me to finish since I can read faster than I can talk. No lips moving with me :) I used to give them an hour, now if it can't get me in 20 minutes I'm out. With my insomnia and vision issues I typically go through 2-3 books a week.

Most recently the one I remember was (sadly) a WoW book. One of Christie Golden's. Don't remember which one but her long purple prose descriptions of trivial details combined with the stupid over long WoW names and the voice of the narrator all contributed to one big no. It's sad that a lot of fantasy books in general spend so much time building a world, giving you the geo-political history with a bunch of nonsense names that aren't important to the story drone on for a long time without getting into the story itself. With a physical book you can skim over the boring parts or go back easily if you realized you did miss some sort of connection or whatever, but not so much with audio.

While not a prude, I don't find "adult" content usually works well in audio. When the author writes "she groaned" does the narrator groan? Not a winner either way :p Anyway, no 50 shades of anything for me in audio.

So my last three finished books: Eye of God, a Sigma Force novel by James Rollins. Not one of the best so far but ok. Last Wild Man of Borneo , non-fiction and a no-vote by me although I finished it. The author was engaged and fascinated by his main characters, a Swiss activist and a Viet Nam era draft dodger who wanted to make fortunes off of the religious art of the native peoples but I was not. Best of the three, The Goddess of Small Victories, a fictionalized account of the wife of mathematician Kurt Godel. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_G%C3%B6del

Next up? Body on Baker Street by Vicki Delany. A light frothy mystery, I liked the author's Constable Molly books. Escape Artist by conspiracy theorist Brad Metzer. Rising Sea by Clive Cussler, one of the NUMA books (my favorite series by him are the Oregon Chronicles -- a boat not the state), and Undertaker's Daughter by Sara Blaedel a Norwegian crime writer.
Brad Sanderson's The Way of Kings, the first of a planned ten-book series called The Stormlight Archive.
War and Peace. 27 Princes and Princesses introduced in the first 10 pages and my head was spinning. Also, the need to describe the handsomeness of each woman's upper lip was ridiculous.
04/06/2018 12:05 PMPosted by Derka
War and Peace. 27 Princes and Princesses introduced in the first 10 pages and my head was spinning. Also, the need to describe the handsomeness of each woman's upper lip was ridiculous.


More annoying than Robert Jordan taking 7 pages to describe the lace table cloth Rand was eating over and after that, learning Rand still didn't understand women?
04/05/2018 11:31 PMPosted by Phitz
Brad Sanderson's The Way of Kings, the first of a planned ten-book series called The Stormlight Archive.


I dont remember how far I got in that one. But the story really started
to drag along, and I finally just put in in the bookshelf and moved
on to something else. Alloy of Law was another one of his that I quit
within a few chapters.
Petals in the Wind

My sister convinced me this series called Flowers in the Attic was awesome. I read the first book and thought "wow, what a tragic story" then I started the second book and thought "wow, this is the worst garbage I've ever read." I couldn't finish it.
I could not finish the War of the Ancients Warcraft book by Richard Knaak. It is to be 3 volumes all condensed into one single book. It has really nice storytelling but it kinda drags on too long and i had to skim through some chapters before not finishing the final 4 chapters. I do plan to finish it when I feel ready for it, it is still in my bookshelf with that bookmarker sitting there just waiting to be finished.
I tried to read The Stand a bunch of times, but never made it past page 50.
Good news for me, I just finished War Crimes by Christie Golden and really enjoyed it. Might have helped that one of my favorite narrators (Scott Brick) did that one.
The second book in the Eragon series. Couldn't take this dude's writing style. Just...tell the story.
Ready Player One.

God, give me anything but that book. On one hand, pop culture references are given paragraphs (or even pages) of over-description. On the other, the book is shallow and perpetuates some really, really awful ideas about gaming culture and women.
I usually am not a book reader, as I'm a much more visual person tbh...like the Hobbit movies to me made a lot more sense than the books. Harry Potter books I could read through though before seeing the movies.

However, Wheel of Time I couldn't get into, too much walls of text...however if they made those books into movie, or a series or something like that...possibly.
So my most recent unfinished book is by Paula Hawkins who wrote Girl on the Train (which I liked), but midway through Into the Water I just decided I didn't want to go on.

I did just finish Jim Butcher's new book/series (he of the Dresden Files), The Aeronaut's Windlass which I really enjoyed and recommend.
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/the-aeronauts-windlass-exciting-steampunk-mashup_us_58bc5cece4b02b8b584dfd14
Don Quixote. I'm stopped in between book one and two, so technically I finished one and just haven't started the other, but in modern times book one and two are published together as a single volume. So, yeah.

I completely understand why it is considered one of the best (series of) books ever written... the satire is generations ahead of its time, likewise the metafiction aspects of it. My problem is that it's really "rinse and repeat", like seriously, hundreds of times.

Quixote says "oh, my, look at this adventure,"
It's not an adventure, it's hijinx.
Hijinx ensue, Quixote wreaks havoc.
His sidekick Sancho Panza takes all of the fallout from the "adventure."
Everyone sits around and talks about how crazy Quixote is.
Repeat.
Repeat.
Repeat for like 1,000 pages.

I'll finish it soon... I could never let such an important piece of literature sit. It's just that in my (irrelevant) opinion, it would have been great at 1/3 the length.
04/06/2018 12:05 PMPosted by Derka
War and Peace. 27 Princes and Princesses introduced in the first 10 pages and my head was spinning. Also, the need to describe the handsomeness of each woman's upper lip was ridiculous.


Man.

I was going to say the exact same book, and for the exact same reason.

I could not keep track of the characters.
05/05/2018 08:02 PMPosted by Andalyr
Ready Player One.

God, give me anything but that book. On one hand, pop culture references are given paragraphs (or even pages) of over-description. On the other, the book is shallow and perpetuates some really, really awful ideas about gaming culture and women.


I was recommended this by someone who has the same taste as I do and I started reading it and got about 100 pages in and threw it away. Simply one of the worst things ever penned, in my opinion.
Moby @%%*!@%* (the whale), I don’t know if it was the book I had but every other chapter was a 12 page explanation of whales, sailor jargon... etc. burnt out after page 270 something.
07/29/2018 06:05 PMPosted by Ragarèn
Moby @%%*!@%* (the whale), I don’t know if it was the book I had but every other chapter was a 12 page explanation of whales, sailor jargon... etc. burnt out after page 270 something.

IMO, you should finish that one, even if you don't absorb all of the scientific information on whales. One of the most amazing endings of all time. By the time you reach the climax of the story, the whale has pretty much had enough of being chased, harpooned, poked, prodded and harassed for its whole life. And the sailors get a huge dose of the repercussions for the torment.

Predictable? Maybe. But I found it to be very dark, scary and psychologically intense. This could be an incredible movie if it wasn't an attempt at a happy-go-lucky fisherman story, which this book is anything but. A Darren Aronofsky version might work.

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