Resources on the Light

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I'm developing a gnome priest that is incredibly devout to the Light. However, I am not quite sure what kind of training and deep understanding priests gain when training or what their religion is like.

Any resources I can look into to gain a better understanding?
Anything and everything we have on it can be found here:
https://wow.gamepedia.com/Light
09/07/2018 05:56 PMPosted by Cannibal
Anything and everything we have on it can be found here:
https://wow.gamepedia.com/Light


Hmmmmm... So there are no "proper" teachings and members of the church are more expected to use their own intuition and interpretations of the three virtues?
09/07/2018 06:37 PMPosted by Teallaigh
Hmmmmm... So there are no "proper" teachings and members of the church are more expected to use their own intuition and interpretations of the three virtues?
Essentially, yes. The Light isn't a centered or organized religion, it's a magical resource that can be attained by anyone who holds enough faith in themselves and their ability to use it.
09/07/2018 06:41 PMPosted by Cannibal
09/07/2018 06:37 PMPosted by Teallaigh
Hmmmmm... So there are no "proper" teachings and members of the church are more expected to use their own intuition and interpretations of the three virtues?
Essentially, yes. The Light isn't a centered or organized religion, it's a magical resource that can be attained by anyone who holds enough faith in themselves and their ability to use it.


Is there any cannon times when the Light refused to help a priest or paladin for making a morally grey decision? Or possibly a decision that the Light didn't approve of?
09/07/2018 06:46 PMPosted by Teallaigh
Is there any cannon times when the Light refused to help a priest or paladin for making a morally grey decision? Or possibly a decision that the Light didn't approve of?
The Light isn't sentient; it can't make decisions and it has no sense of morals. It's just magic. If the user believes they are doing the right thing, they can use the Light, whether what they're doing is truly good or not. The best example of this is the Scarlet Crusade, who utilize the Light all the time, but who also torture and murder anyone who "affiliates" with the undead (who can also use the Light, by the way). It's the same reason a Horde and Alliance paladin can use the Light offensively on one another.
Thank you for the answers and resources! It was very... Illuminating :D

:D
:D
:D

I'm so sorry
09/07/2018 07:23 PMPosted by Cannibal
09/07/2018 06:46 PMPosted by Teallaigh
Is there any cannon times when the Light refused to help a priest or paladin for making a morally grey decision? Or possibly a decision that the Light didn't approve of?
The Light isn't sentient; it can't make decisions and it has no sense of morals. It's just magic. If the user believes they are doing the right thing, they can use the Light, whether what they're doing is truly good or not. The best example of this is the Scarlet Crusade, who utilize the Light all the time, but who also torture and murder anyone who "affiliates" with the undead (who can also use the Light, by the way). It's the same reason a Horde and Alliance paladin can use the Light offensively on one another.

As Cannibal said, it’s the users who make the decisions. For example, when Alleria turned to the void, Xe’ra blatently told Alleria she would no longer be accepted and treated pretty much as a prisoner until she turned towards the light.
Not so...

While it is true the User has a strong effect on their own ability to use the light, there are at least two cases where the light, "Abandoned" someone. The most recognizable would be Arthas and the Culling of Strathome. It is said his hammer refused to glow. No matter how righteous he thought his goal was, the light refused to aid him in the task.

The second I believe was during the second war when Turrelion's teacher lost to the Orc and the Doomhammer. But I could be wrong on that.
09/07/2018 10:47 PMPosted by Doseki
The most recognizable would be Arthas and the Culling of Strathome. It is said his hammer refused to glow. No matter how righteous he thought his goal was, the light refused to aid him in the task.
You must be misremembering, because the Light didn't abandon him in Stratholme. In fact, the Light made his hammer weigh less, and there's no mention of its glow or weight being affected while he slaughtered civilians. Arthas: Rise of the Lich King, pg. 140

Arthas utilized the Light until he himself abandoned it in favor of necromantic magics, not the other way around.

09/07/2018 10:47 PMPosted by Doseki
The second I believe was during the second war when Turrelion's teacher lost to the Orc and the Doomhammer. But I could be wrong on that.
Turalyon's increased ability and resolve, according to Tides of Darkness, pg. 354, was due to his perception that the orcs weren't apart of the Light's guidance or protection. It was his own, subjective conclusion that led him to wield the Light in a stronger manner, not the Light's sudden decision to empower him.

Doomhammer's words - "I have conquered! And so shall all our foes die, until your world belongs to us!" - brought Turalyon to a revelation. For months he had been struggling with his faith and had been unable to wield the Light like Uther and the other paladins could. He did not understand how to reconcile the notion of the Light uniting all creatures while beings as cruel and monstrous as the orcs walked the world, but Orgrim's comment reminded him that the orcs were not of his world. Turalyon reasoned that the Light only united the creatures of Azeroth, and that creatures who did not belong there - like the orcs - could be struck down with impunity.


We know Turalyon's conclusion here is incorrect either way, as non-Azerothians such as the draenei, arakkoa, naaru and even orcs themselves are capable of wielding it with the same amount of resolve. Despite him being objectively incorrect, he believed it enough himself that his own faith in the Light strengthened, which further reinforces that the Light doesn't make moral decisions; its wielders do, and since morality is entirely subjective, so long as the wielder believes they're doing good, they can wield the Light.
Having never read the book myself I can't really say. That information came from an outlying source that escapes me. It could be from chronicles or even a wow-tuber. It is just something I remember standing out that while his forces and Jaina abandoned him, so to did the light that day. It was a turning point for Arthas prior to him trading his hammer for Frostmourne inside the cave.

Speaking of:
    "In fact, the Light made his hammer weigh less" …
    "there's no mention of its glow or weight being affected"

You cannot really have it both ways. Either it mentioned that his hammer was lighter and thus the light was aiding him in the slaughter of his people or it wasn't. I cannot imagine as a Paladin even if it was not necessary to use it, Arthas did not even attempt to use the light during the culling.

I'll have to see if I can backtrack my source but I cannot promise I will find it having no real idea where I heard/read it to begin with.

I know in the case of the scarlets you would be correct. Objectively we see them as the villains or evil because that is how the story portrays them. However a villain is often times the opposition to some side whom thinks their cause or path is just. It didn't help that they were being lead by a demon but I digress. Because we "humanize" The undead and they become less monsters suddenly those whom feel they need to be protected become the monsters. Thus Scarlets became evil and the villains of the story.

Your explanation helps from both a game mechanic and perhaps story position to explain both Horde and Alliance being able to use the light on each other. Even if it is flawed to some degree.
My main reason for wondering about the Lights gifts being retractable comes from what happens in the Mag'har story.

SPOILER ALERT

But it seems like a full on crusade being pushed by the Naaru. If it continues further I was wondering if they would become dark along with the Lightbound. Though, I guess if the SC didn't lose the lights then this won't be happening.
09/08/2018 09:56 PMPosted by Doseki
It was a turning point for Arthas prior to him trading his hammer for Frostmourne inside the cave.
That'd be well after the culling of Stratholme.

09/08/2018 09:56 PMPosted by Doseki
Speaking of:
"In fact, the Light made his hammer weigh less" …
"there's no mention of its glow or weight being affected"

You cannot really have it both ways. Either it mentioned that his hammer was lighter and thus the light was aiding him in the slaughter of his people or it wasn't.
That's a mistype on my end. The hammer's weight was lighter.

09/08/2018 09:56 PMPosted by Doseki
Arthas did not even attempt to use the light during the culling.
He actually does use the Light during his slaughter of civilians, casting Exorcism (though only on undead mobs), a healing Light spell on himself such as Holy Light, and Devotion Aura.
https://www.wowhead.com/npc=26499/arthas#abilities

09/08/2018 09:56 PMPosted by Doseki
I know in the case of the scarlets you would be correct. Objectively we see them as the villains or evil because that is how the story portrays them. However a villain is often times the opposition to some side whom thinks their cause or path is just. It didn't help that they were being lead by a demon but I digress. Because we "humanize" The undead and they become less monsters suddenly those whom feel they need to be protected become the monsters. Thus Scarlets became evil and the villains of the story.
Exactly. Morality is subjective, and the Light has no sense of subjectivity. It goes to the aid of anyone who has faith in it, despite what their own definitions of "good" may be.

09/08/2018 10:50 PMPosted by Teallaigh
But it seems like a full on crusade being pushed by the Naaru. If it continues further I was wondering if they would become dark along with the Lightbound. Though, I guess if the SC didn't lose the lights then this won't be happening.
Correct. The Lightbound believe they're doing the right thing, therefore they can use the Light, despite the fact that they're just committing genocide on a generation of orcs that did no wrong.
09/07/2018 07:41 PMPosted by Teallaigh
Thank you for the answers and resources! It was very... Illuminating :D

:D
:D
:D

I'm so sorry
u better be sorry night elf

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