Math question.

Arenas
Who actually is in charge of the math for this game? I just want to know who to direct my hate towards.
From a blue post: 2+2 is 4 minus 1 is 3
quick maths
Honest question, who does the math for abilities.
Brian Holinka and Ion Hazzikoastas,
Ion is a math genius and a lawyer.
It’s the Director of Maths, duh.

Who do you think is in charge of maths? Spec says make hit do X. Dev writes code that implements hit does X. Other dev reviews code that says hit does X. Code ships. Bug is found that makes hit do Y when Z = W. Dev fixes bug. Code ships. Repeat.

Go write software and see for yourself how the best laid plans of mice and men go awry.
10/30/2018 11:29 PMPosted by Santaklause
Who actually is in charge of the math for this game? I just want to know who to direct my hate towards.
ppl with twice your schooling and 3x your salary
That's who
10/31/2018 01:56 AMPosted by Sicbuttons
10/30/2018 11:29 PMPosted by Santaklause
Who actually is in charge of the math for this game? I just want to know who to direct my hate towards.
ppl with twice your schooling and 3x your salary
That's who


And forum alts
10/30/2018 11:31 PMPosted by Dcv
From a blue post: 2+2 is 4 minus 1 is 3
quick maths


Sad but that was an actual blue Post
10/31/2018 01:56 AMPosted by Sicbuttons
10/30/2018 11:29 PMPosted by Santaklause
Who actually is in charge of the math for this game? I just want to know who to direct my hate towards.
ppl with twice your schooling and 3x your salary
That's who


Hey man, zero times anything is still zero. If Ion is the one setting the numbers, he should take some more math classes. This is just embarrassing this expansion.
10/31/2018 01:56 AMPosted by Sicbuttons
10/30/2018 11:29 PMPosted by Santaklause
Who actually is in charge of the math for this game? I just want to know who to direct my hate towards.
ppl with twice your schooling and 3x your salary
That's who


You think they make that much... Why do people in school make comments like this.
Question is... is Ion even qualified to talk about ions? And what sort of ions is he referring too? Let's look at a generic aqueous reaction of NaCl with AgNO3 that yields sodium nitrate----->

Ag+(aq)+ Cl-(aq)--->AgCl(s) - [Ionic equation] Chlorine Ion being the anion- it gained an electron, whereas Ag+ is a cation where it lost an electron

NaCl(aq)+AgNO3(aq)----> NaNO3(aq)+ AgCl(s)(precipitates)- [Chemical notation]

This is simple stuff, so let's delve a little bit deeper to see why AgCl does not dissolve in water.

Now, since Ion is probably adept at this (let's assume)-- let's see what compounds are soluble or insoluble in water (aq). Let's first take a look at the polarities of the substances. Generally, polar substances dissolve in polar solvents, whereas nonpolar dissolves in nonpolar substances or solvents.

AgCl happens to be a non polar molecule(it's structure is symmetrical). Essentially, this means there is too much lattice energy holding the precipitant (AgCl) together for it to dissolve in water. AgCl's lattice is too strong for the formation of hydrated ions to overcome it's lattice to dissolve. Water happens to be very good example of a strong hydrogen bond, which is also a special kind of dipole.

Now, you may ask how could I dissolve a compound that does not dissolve in an aqueous solution?. Well, there are many ways you could go about this. For silver chloride's sake, a solvent that would dissolve AgCl, would be a non polar substance such as the organic compound CCl4 (carbon tetrachloride).

A simple example of how one could reverse solubility would be something like Copper nitrate in water.

Initially, copper nitrate will dissolve in water, creating a light, blue clear solution. However, if you were to then add Sodium Hydroxide (which happens to be a base), the solution would form a blue "gooey" precipitant, which is pretty cool to see for yourself, if you ever get the chance to experiment with those chemicals.

I hopefully have shed some insight on Ion's math skills or maybe what some were hoping to hear on this thread.

Thank you.
Give an example of incorrect math you’ve found
10/31/2018 05:10 PMPosted by Apheliah
Give an example of incorrect math you’ve found


2+2=5
10/31/2018 04:57 PMPosted by Amplify
Question is... is Ion even qualified to talk about ions? And what sort of ions is he referring too? Let's look at a generic aqueous reaction of NaCl with AgNO3 that yields sodium nitrate----->

Ag+(aq)+ Cl-(aq)--->AgCl(s) - [Ionic equation] Chlorine Ion being the anion- it gained an electron, whereas Ag+ is a cation where it lost an electron

NaCl(aq)+AgNO3(aq)----> NaNO3(aq)+ AgCl(s)(precipitates)- [Chemical notation]

This is simple stuff, so let's delve a little bit deeper to see why AgCl does not dissolve in water.

Now, since Ion is probably adept at this (let's assume)-- let's see what compounds are soluble or insoluble in water (aq). Let's first take a look at the polarities of the substances. Generally, polar substances dissolve in polar solvents, whereas nonpolar dissolves in nonpolar substances or solvents.

AgCl happens to be a non polar molecule(it's structure is symmetrical). Essentially, this means there is too much lattice energy holding the precipitant (AgCl) together for it to dissolve in water. AgCl's lattice is too strong for the formation of hydrated ions to overcome it's lattice to dissolve. Water happens to be very good example of a strong hydrogen bond, which is also a special kind of dipole.

Now, you may ask how could I dissolve a compound that does not dissolve in an aqueous solution?. Well, there are many ways you could go about this. For silver chloride's sake, a solvent that would dissolve AgCl, would be a non polar substance such as the organic compound CCl4 (carbon tetrachloride).

A simple example of how one could reverse solubility would be something like Copper nitrate in water.

Initially, copper nitrate will dissolve in water, creating a light, blue clear solution. However, if you were to then add Sodium Hydroxide (which happens to be a base), the solution would form a blue "gooey" precipitant, which is pretty cool to see for yourself, if you ever get the chance to experiment with those chemicals.

I hopefully have shed some insight on Ion's math skills or maybe what some were hoping to hear on this thread.

Thank you.


Regardless of whatever he says.... this guy's on drugs EZ. Put the addy down
10/31/2018 05:51 PMPosted by Lafs
10/31/2018 05:10 PMPosted by Apheliah
Give an example of incorrect math you’ve found


2+2=5
Don't question my authority or put me in the dock,
'Cause I'm not,
'Cause I'm not
Nasty
10/31/2018 04:57 PMPosted by Amplify
Question is... is Ion even qualified to talk about ions? And what sort of ions is he referring too? Let's look at a generic aqueous reaction of NaCl with AgNO3 that yields sodium nitrate----->

Ag+(aq)+ Cl-(aq)--->AgCl(s) - [Ionic equation] Chlorine Ion being the anion- it gained an electron, whereas Ag+ is a cation where it lost an electron

NaCl(aq)+AgNO3(aq)----> NaNO3(aq)+ AgCl(s)(precipitates)- [Chemical notation]

This is simple stuff, so let's delve a little bit deeper to see why AgCl does not dissolve in water.

Now, since Ion is probably adept at this (let's assume)-- let's see what compounds are soluble or insoluble in water (aq). Let's first take a look at the polarities of the substances. Generally, polar substances dissolve in polar solvents, whereas nonpolar dissolves in nonpolar substances or solvents.

AgCl happens to be a non polar molecule(it's structure is symmetrical). Essentially, this means there is too much lattice energy holding the precipitant (AgCl) together for it to dissolve in water. AgCl's lattice is too strong for the formation of hydrated ions to overcome it's lattice to dissolve. Water happens to be very good example of a strong hydrogen bond, which is also a special kind of dipole.

Now, you may ask how could I dissolve a compound that does not dissolve in an aqueous solution?. Well, there are many ways you could go about this. For silver chloride's sake, a solvent that would dissolve AgCl, would be a non polar substance such as the organic compound CCl4 (carbon tetrachloride).

A simple example of how one could reverse solubility would be something like Copper nitrate in water.

Initially, copper nitrate will dissolve in water, creating a light, blue clear solution. However, if you were to then add Sodium Hydroxide (which happens to be a base), the solution would form a blue "gooey" precipitant, which is pretty cool to see for yourself, if you ever get the chance to experiment with those chemicals.

I hopefully have shed some insight on Ion's math skills or maybe what some were hoping to hear on this thread.

Thank you.


Nah man, that's chemistry. That's an applied math at best.
10/31/2018 05:10 PMPosted by Apheliah
Give an example of incorrect math you’ve found


The ole millennial argument. Give me an example of where math is bad.

Sit on Ole' Santa's lap my boy.

Azerite skills are a joke in themselves. They are lottery damage with no testing.

PvP balance is at an all time low. For a small brained peasant, PvP as a lock would be the equivalence of getting Coal on Christmas Day then contracting ebola.

The RNG lottery this expansion is less RNG and more power drill to your temple( see the movie PI).

Legion World Quests give more gold than Beta for Azeroth ones.

Multiple Mythic+ bosses have unavoidable damage that wasn't tuned.

The failure of math makes Santa's eyes bleed. But don't worry child, Santa will bring you a coloring book this Xmas, it's more your speed!

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