WrA Cooking Thread

Wyrmrest Accord
EY.

Do you like cooking? You got a recipe you wanna share? Alternatively, does your toon have any cooking feats? Discussion about that kind of stuff goes here.

I'm just gonna warm us up with something I make every winter. It's got two ingredients in it, but it's the best thing in cold, cold weather. Veggie stew.

-Obtain yourself some tomato and yellow squash. Also, grab the salt and pepper out of the pantry. You can use olive oil in this, but it's not mandatory.

-Chop tomatoes and squash into quarter-pieces, or just evenly sized chunks. I usually do 3 tomatoes for every 2 squash, but ratio is up to you. Toss them in a pot, turn on medium heat, add appropriate amounts of salt and pepper, and then cover with a lid.

-Turn it down to low after a while, and let it simmer out slowly. Adjust seasoning to taste, but every time you lift the lid make sure to stir your veg around once or twice.

-Wait until veggies are nearly liquefied, and then take pot off the heat. That's it. You're done. Serve as a meal, or a side.

Best thing is that you can add anything you want to this, within reason. Zucchini, eggplant, onion, mushrooms... I've tried it all, and it's all good as long as everything's the same size. If you do use more than two components, you might want to add another seasoning to the mix, whether it's savory or spicy. Maybe something green and herby, too. This would go really well with pork, or you could sear some diced pork cuts and then dump them in the stew.

When I was in college, I cooked a lot for myself. Simple recipes with few ingredients that I could just throw in one pot worked best in my dorm room. I made everything in a cheap rice cooker, which is basically just a pot. If you're living in tight quarters, I really suggest you make the $13 investment and get one. It's very versatile.
I like to make beef stew when it gets cold and toast some crusty bread with it.

Ingredients:
Carrots - I like to just buy a small bag of the little ones
1 medium onion, I usually go with yellow, but will use white if not.
2 lbs of red potatoes... or 3 or 4 if you love them as much as my wife and I.
2 tbsp avocado oil (Or olive oil)
4 cloves garlic, minced.
1 1/2 lbs beef stew meat
Salt and pepper
1/4 cup flour
2 cups beef broth
2 tbsp dijon mustard
1 tbsp worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp soy sauce
1/2 tbsp brown sugar
1/2 tbsp dried rosemary
1/2 tsp thyme
1 tsp Turmeric, I add this at my wife's request to most savory dishes I cook. Something about it being healthy for something... I may have forgotten.

Directions:
1. Dice the onions and cut the potatoes into one inch cubes about. Place them along with the carrots into a large slow cooker.

2. Place the meat in a large bowl and season with salt and pepper. Add the flour and toss until all the pieces are coated, then set aside.

3. Heat the oil in a large heavy skillet over medium heat and saute the garlic for about a minute. Add the meat, including any leftover flour, and brown all sides best you can. Add to slow cooker and mix with the veggies.

4. Turn the heat for the skillet down to low and add the broth, sauces, mustard, brown sugar, and herbs(And turmeric if you want). Stir and try to dissolve any brown bits. Then add to slow cooker.

5. Place the lid on and cook on high for four hours. Stir and serve.

- Also good served on rice or egg noodles. Celery can be added with the other veggies if you like it, my wife and I don't so I didn't include it. If you'd prefer to cut up the carrots instead of buying baby ones, 4 medium ones will work too.
I really like making usuyaki tamago (egg crepes) in the morning.

Per one egg, use: 1 tbsp of cornstarch, 1 tbsp of water, 1 teaspoon of sugar and a pinch of salt. I dissolve cornstarch into water first then add sugar (granulated or baking sugar, doesn't really matter) and finally egg.

Spread out a thin layer on the pan and cook it until the upside of it is dry. Flip it over for a few seconds to even out how it's cooked.

Fold it all up nicely and add strawberry jam for best results. It's light, it's fast, easily packed into a lunch and eaten later since it doesn't have to be hot or super fresh. You can stick the sheer, crepe-like egg in the fridge for a few days if you want, it's to your discretion.

The standard recipe typically calls for way more sugar but I find that less sugar tastes far better and it's more adaptable: can have it with jam, can eat it standalone, can make cheese blintzes later, can chop it up into strips to do something else with, whatever.

I don't recommend making more than 2-3 eggs worth unless you want a lot of crepes: you can make up to 3 crepes per egg's worth of mix.
Most of my "recipes" are just easy/lazy ones. I made a bomb corn chowder last winter but I don't remember how I did it now lol.

Pizzadillas

Put tortilla in pan on medium heat. Sprinkle as much or as little mozzarella/parm/etc cheese on half of tortilla. Put pepperoni on cheese. Put more cheese on pepperoni. Fold tortilla over and cook until cheese is all melty. Warm pizza sauce in microwave and use for dipping.

Corn Dip

Ingredients:

2 packages of cream cheese
1 cup of shredded cheddar
1 tomato
1 can of corn (or two if you're obsessed with corn like me)
Jalapenos (however many you'd like)
Chili powder
Tortilla chips!

Preheat oven to 350. Dice tomato and jalapenos into small pieces. Drain corn.
In a large bowl, mix the cream cheese, cheddar, tomato, corn, and jalapenos. Put the mixture into a round baking pan/cake pan and sprinkle the top with however much chili powder you'd like, or go without. Cook for 15-20 minutes, or until you notice the top/sides browning. Really, its just to heat the whole thing.
Enjoy!
I recently tried a new approach to pulled pork that worked great! Pork butt is pretty cheap, though it comes in big chunks so I made a sort of base recipe that I worked into two different meals.

BASIC PULLED PORK

- 5 or so pounds of pork butt (mine had a bone, but boneless works too)
- a 15ish oz. can of low sodium chicken or vegetable broth
- one bay leaf
- 4 or so cloves of garlic, crushed (you can just flatten them with a butter knife)
- salt and pepper to taste
- 2 tablespoons liquid smoke (purely optional, I love my smoky goodness)

1. Trim fat off your pork. If it's boneless, you can cut it up a bit and get at the interior fat too.

2. Plop that sucker in a slow cooker.

3. Sprinkle salt and pepper all over, then pour on the broth and liquid smoke.

4. Drop in the garlic around the pork, add the bay leaf, then cook on low for 8 hours or high for 5 hours. I turned the pork over once along the way, but that probably wasn't necessary.

5. Check that the pork comes apart easily with a fork, then move it to a large bowl. Use tongs if you've got 'em!

6. Pull the pork apart using two dinner forks until it's all shredded. Taste and add spices if desired.

7. Slather with your favorite sauce and serve it on something. I mixed half of this with some teriyaki sauce for sandwiches, and the other half with a couple cans of diced tomatoes with chiles and taco seasonings for pulled pork tacos.
Anyaka's Awesome Beet Kvass

Take two beets. Cube them, bout to a half inch.

Take one turnip and one small onion. Cube them too.

Pop it in a half gallon jar, add a tablespoon (or less) of salt, cover with water, use a weight (I suggest the top of a beet, cut to a size so it won't bob above the brine) to keep the veggies submerged, and forget it exists for a week. Return, drink some of it, pop the rest in the fridge.
My undead - who currently doesn't have an in-game character - was a chef. Cooking was a passion hobby of hers in life, and she'd continually steal the tongues of those she killed for the ability to continue tasting things.
Needless, her comrades were a little disturbed when they found out who was cooking the meals. She wasn't putting anything weird in the dishes (unless they were working with scraps), so it hurt her feelings that people - usually elves - would be putting janky parts into their soups.
Gourment, dang it!

Que' here enjoys cooking as well, but not to the same extent. She spent a lot of time with the above character, and picked up some tricks from her.
She vastly prefers baking.

And I somewhat enjoy cooking IRL, although I can't afford a wide variety of ingredients. It's become a hobby of mine to take dollar store/clearance food and make something good out of it.
Frozen vegetables really are your best friend when money's tight. Trust.
*takes off glasses*

That is one big pile of
10/26/2018 08:06 AMPosted by Fateweaver
crepes


I will try some of these. I enjoy cooking.
WE AIN'T DONE HERE

Baked Ziti (or Penne, whichever you like more)

-Obtain some pasta of appropriate shape, grated parmesan cheese, shredded mozzarella cheese, whole and preferably fresh-ish mozzarella, fresh basil leaves (optional) and tomato sauce. You can either make it yourself, or go buy it pre-made, just make sure it's not too runny. Need a little bit of body for this.

-If you haven't bought the cheese grated, go ahead and grate it now. Take your fresher mozzarella and slice it into half-inch pieces. Also get that pasta to a boil. Cook it normally, not al dente but not too soft. You'll be cooking it again.

-Get your sauce in another pot, and warm it slowly. Turn it to medium, and when it starts to get bubbles turn it down to low/simmer. Just keep it warm, and stir every now and then.

-When that's warm and you've got cooked pasta, put the pasta in and stir it up. Put parm. cheese in, as well as shredded mozz., and give it some stirring until the cheese dissolves. You can add a little cream here, if you want, but I don't recommend it. Lotsa dairy in this.

-Get yourself a Pyrex dish or some sort of pan, and pour your cheese pasta mix in it. Layer your fresh basil on top, and then the fresh mozzarella on top of that. Drizzle with olive oil if desired, but no reason to.

(You would freeze it here if you didn't want to cook it the same day.)

-Put the pan in your oven, toaster or traditional, and bake it for a few minutes. We don't need to preheat anything, because everything is already cooked. You're just watching it until the cheese on top browns a little bit.

-Once you have obtained small spots of browned cheese, take it out and let it cool. Voila. Pairs well with a fresh, lettuce salad.

Depending on how much pasta you used, this can last you for a long time. It's one of the recipes you have to judge by eye, adjust to your tastes, and is one of the easiest things to make. It's a really good practice for beginners to rely more on their own capabilities than just a recipe's directions.

It's also super delicious, easy comfort food. Just don't eat too much of it if you don't wanna be in the bathroom all night. Moderation, my dudes.

I make my own sauce for this. Maybe I'll post that recipe next.
IC Versca is a cook and is terribly bad. She can't taste or smell but she does try her hardest! Eat at your own risk!

IRL everything I cook has low effort and time in mind because I don't have a ton of free time. I do a lot of weekly meal prep and one that I like to do is Japanese curry in my instant pot. I live by a Japanese grocery store so curry will sometimes go on sale for 86 cents a box! Typically I buy Golden Curry cubes (never the liquid) and always get the extra hot version but there's also a mild and no spicy version for those that don't care for spice. I think you can get these at major grocery stores or you can order it off Amazon.

Bare in mind I pretty much eye ball all of this since I make this pretty regularly, I have an eight quart instant pot too. You can make a vegetarian version or meat version. I usually start by layering the bottom of my instant pot with diced up chicken meat. Then I add potatoes, carrots, onions and celery. I usually get soup potatoes so I don't have to dice them up.

I add about two cups of chicken broth to the instant pot but the last couple of times I made this I ran outta broth so I just used water lol. It was just a little less rich. Then I add the curry blocks on top, I add all eight and then I cook on meat/stew for 15 minutes. Once it's done I release the pressure and then stir while it's on warm and that's it!! You got a week's worth of curry!

The vegetarian version is the same process, just don't add chicken haha. I do it sometimes this way only because I will sometimes get breaded chicken breasts so I can make katsu chicken to eat with my curry :3
Bump. Here's another two-dinners plan featuring an inexpensive cut of meat!

Split chicken breasts are ones with bones and skin. They freeze well, and once cooked you can slice off the big hunk of meat and save the rest for soup.

Roast Chicken Breasts with Rice

- 2 split chicken breasts
- 1 14.5 oz can chicken broth
- a few tbsp olive oil
- 2 tsp or so paprika
- 2 tbsp or so poultry seasoning; or sage, rosemary and/or thyme
- salt and pepper to taste
- 4 cups cooked rice (see package to figure out how much uncooked rice you need to use)
- 3 tbsp water
- 3 tbsp cornstarch

1. Preheat your oven to 475°.
2. Tuck the chicken into a high-rimmed baking dish that doesn't have too much extra room.
3. Pour broth all over the chicken, then drizzle all over with olive oil. Season generously with all of your spices.
4. Set out a baster, brush or large metal spoon, then bake for 45 minutes. You'll want to baste twice along the way - see https://www.thekitchn.com/technique-how-to-baste-106751 if you want some tips.
5. Meanwhile, cook your rice.
6. When the chicken is finished, either jab a meat thermometer in the thickest part (you want 165°) or cut it to ensure the knife passes through easily and the juices run clear rather than pink. If needed, you can bake the chicken at ten minute intervals until it's done.
7. Once ready, cut off the top section of each breast with a steak knife or thin kitchen knife. Meanwhile, pour the broth into a saucepan and set to medium heat.
8. In a small cup, pour water and gradually stir in cornstarch. Scoop out any clumps, then stir the starchy water into your pot of broth. Stir regularly until it thickens to a gravy-like consistency.
9. Serve chicken, rice and gravy with your favorite veggie side. Save leftover rice and gravy, and your unused split breast portions, for later use.

Chicken Soup

- Leftovers from Meal #1
- 32 oz. chicken stock (for a slightly richer, buttery texture) or broth
- a few stalks of celery, chopped
- a few carrots, peeled and chopped
- one yellow or white onion, chopped
- more poultry seasoning, salt and pepper

1. Combine stock/broth and leftover gravy in a large pot and heat to a simmer. Skim off any surface gunk with a metal spoon.
2. Add spices and veggies, and keep simmering for about 20 minutes or until veggies are tender.
3. Meanwhile, pick meat off of your split breasts. Break it all into bitesize pieces.
4. Stir meat and rice into the soup. Taste and adjust spices as needed. Once everything is warmed through, it's ready!
There are eight turkey's in my freezers that i did not pay a dime for. (Free 20 Pound butterball turkey with a flu shot that was free with a specific health plan so we all went and got flu shots.)

I am going to make so much turkey gravy
10/27/2018 11:17 AMPosted by Versca
IC Versca is a cook and is terribly bad. She can't taste or smell but she does try her hardest! Eat at your own risk!

IRL everything I cook has low effort and time in mind because I don't have a ton of free time. I do a lot of weekly meal prep and one that I like to do is Japanese curry in my instant pot. I live by a Japanese grocery store so curry will sometimes go on sale for 86 cents a box! Typically I buy Golden Curry cubes (never the liquid) and always get the extra hot version but there's also a mild and no spicy version for those that don't care for spice. I think you can get these at major grocery stores or you can order it off Amazon.

Bare in mind I pretty much eye ball all of this since I make this pretty regularly, I have an eight quart instant pot too. You can make a vegetarian version or meat version. I usually start by layering the bottom of my instant pot with diced up chicken meat. Then I add potatoes, carrots, onions and celery. I usually get soup potatoes so I don't have to dice them up.

I add about two cups of chicken broth to the instant pot but the last couple of times I made this I ran outta broth so I just used water lol. It was just a little less rich. Then I add the curry blocks on top, I add all eight and then I cook on meat/stew for 15 minutes. Once it's done I release the pressure and then stir while it's on warm and that's it!! You got a week's worth of curry!

The vegetarian version is the same process, just don't add chicken haha. I do it sometimes this way only because I will sometimes get breaded chicken breasts so I can make katsu chicken to eat with my curry :3


I would drown myself in Japanese curry if I could.

As for my own recipes, I don't really have anything written out since I tend to eyeball spices instead of measure. I made this pan-to-pot diced pork for sandwiches last week that came out pretty good, though. I buy a whole pork loin and slice it up into chops/cubes/roast/etc myself.

Anyway, take about a pound of cubed pork, leave some fat on it. Heat up a freshly-oiled cast-iron and once the pan's got a bit of a shimmer, drop the pork in.

From here, I add kosher salt, black pepper, paprika, and minced garlic. Get everything nice and browned, then transfer the meat to an instant pot (I used chicken broth in the pot instead of water).

Before you close it up, take some more chicken broth and a pat of butter and toss it into the cast-iron so you can get all that good seasoning and pork bits off the pan. Let it cook for just a minute (it'll smoke out pretty quick), then pour the juice into the instant pot.

Lock it up and let it pressure cook for about 10 minutes (pork's pretty much already done at this point, but this will soften it up some more). Fish the pork out onto a cutting board and dice it up, then put it all back in the juice and stir it around.

At this point you can let it sit for 10 or so minutes to soak in the good stuff, or just eat it. Personally, I recommend some good potato buns and a little dab of mayo. Swiss cheese also does good work here.

If you're putting the pork on buns, butter the inside of the buns and toast them in the cast-iron before it cools. Can't go wrong.

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