What do community managers do all day?

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10/18/2018 11:31 AMPosted by Ythisens
10/18/2018 11:23 AMPosted by Solarwynds
Anyway, I am fascinated by some of the responses here. You have a job description, an anecdotal account by Bashiok, and further clarification from Ythisens and many of you persist in acting like they get paid to do nothing. Unbelievable.

In their defense its understandable since most of what we do is behind the scenes. When you see a drop off in blue posts and all you know us from is that then you can be left wondering "Wait I thought you do this? Why are you not doing this?". I think that's fair but I'd rather establish why that might be the case for that moment as the activity of blue posts comes in waves based on what we have to communicate as well as our extra time to do it.

Right now for example a lot of my week has been taken up by BlizzCon tasks and projects versus not anything I have at the moment to communicate, so I delay the posting to take care of those things. That also means that by writing this post now I'm procrastinating that a little >.>

We obviously have things in the pipe communication wise to get to you but just not ready to be fired out to you guys yet.


I do not miss this aspect of my former job.
"Uhh, you're aware me tweaking the database is going to take a while because you coded it nine kinds of jacked up, right? That means I won't be able to do helpdesk for a while"
Two days later: I thought you were helpdesk? My printer's been broken for two days!
Me: Talk to your boss to talk to my boss. Put in a ticket. I'm, literally, the only programmer in the department but paid as helpdesk. So.. pick one. I can't do both.

Admittedly it was fun bringing a 127GB database down to ~16GB. Normalization people... seriously. Do it.

Anyways... again, I do not miss the part where you don't look like you're doing anything and you're doing tasks technically way outside of your job description and pay.
10/18/2018 10:36 AMPosted by Ythisens
I would encourage everyone here to read Bashiok's original "[url="http://us.blizzard.com/en-us/company/about/b20/interviews.html#thirdInterview"]A Day In The Life[/url]" as its still very relevant to some of the things I do. The Office Spade reference he makes to describe CMing is too real that its painful.

My day to day differs a little bit since this was a few years back so it might be a refreshing thing to do a new one of these.


Go home every day at 8:00? You guys work too much.

:/
10/18/2018 10:17 PMPosted by Mirasol

The issue is the Devs don't easily give approval to talk about anything until it is pretty much a DONE deal and in the final stages. Why? If they propose something and changes it they get called liars, even if they say it is a prototype/trial. It gets ugly. They now say nothing :(


I mean nothing personal against you (as the messenger) or the CMs (as the intermediaries who have Rules To Follow), or even the devs (who may well be completely out-of-touch/unaware), but this manner of thinking is absurd. This reaction punishes the millions of sensible players that understand what a 'promise' is or isn't for the reactions of, dare I say it, really stupid/immature players.

And I'm pretty sick of it. It reeks of an "easy out," excuse, which then leads to distrust between the community and "The Team," which leads to increased toxicity. I posit to you that the wave of negativity you currently see wouldn't be nearly as bad if Blizzard returned to a more open and honest (or, in industry terms, "transparent") even monologue if they're too worried to enter dialogue mode.

Maybe Ghostcrawler was an oddball. I see other companies behaving like him, though--and to this day he still keeps tumblrs and other things where he gives insights and takes questions. The current situation is a mess, and it's a mess of the team's own creation--either via failed communication/pr strategies, or failed design, or both.
10/19/2018 07:33 AMPosted by Zugnificent
10/18/2018 10:17 PMPosted by Mirasol

The issue is the Devs don't easily give approval to talk about anything until it is pretty much a DONE deal and in the final stages. Why? If they propose something and changes it they get called liars, even if they say it is a prototype/trial. It gets ugly. They now say nothing :(


I mean nothing personal against you (as the messenger) or the CMs (as the intermediaries who have Rules To Follow), or even the devs (who may well be completely out-of-touch/unaware), but this manner of thinking is absurd. This reaction punishes the millions of sensible players that understand what a 'promise' is or isn't for the reactions of, dare I say it, really stupid/immature players.

And I'm pretty sick of it. It reeks of an "easy out," excuse, which then leads to distrust between the community and "The Team," which leads to increased toxicity. I posit to you that the wave of negativity you currently see wouldn't be nearly as bad if Blizzard returned to a more open and honest (or, in industry terms, "transparent") even monologue if they're too worried to enter dialogue mode.

Maybe Ghostcrawler was an oddball. I see other companies behaving like him, though--and to this day he still keeps tumblrs and other things where he gives insights and takes questions. The current situation is a mess, and it's a mess of the team's own creation--either via failed communication/pr strategies, or failed design, or both.


Millions of sensible players? On GD? Where? When?

I posit to you, that WoW players are so negative about everything possible, that even if we had cameras set up in literally every room and office at Blizzard, and we had 100% transparency down to when they take their bathroom breaks...we'd still complain about communication.
10/18/2018 10:42 AMPosted by Ythisens
10/18/2018 10:22 AMPosted by Derpaartos
But it turns out Blizzard literally has a dedicated timeslot for people to play video games.

This differs from team to team, so some do it and some don't. It's mainly done as team building exercises. Wouldn't you rather play games with your coworkers and bond that way? It's also only when we have the time to play, my team for example has ours scheduled on Fridays after our last team meeting for the week for the last 2 hours of our typical "workday". This often gets cancelled though as we might have projects that we're working on. We haven't had ours for a few weeks so we've been playing on the weekends or after work.


Hell no. I don't want anything to do with my coworkers outside of the task at hand. I have family & friends for social.
10/19/2018 09:03 AMPosted by Akston


Millions of sensible players? On GD? Where? When?

I posit to you, that WoW players are so negative about everything possible, that even if we had cameras set up in literally every room and office at Blizzard, and we had 100% transparency down to when they take their bathroom breaks...we'd still complain about communication.


That's surprisingly pessimistic of someone that I see so defensive/optimistic about players and Blizzard as a company elsewhere in the forums!

I think we'd have more complaints about the game, because the communication would be improved and people would feel like their complaints or feedback was 'heard.'

And I'd welcome that over all the meta-arguments. The game needs improvement in many aspects and there's a wealth of great feedback out there. The focus should be on there, not on the fact that the communication process is so "hidden/removed" that so many feel unheard (and have no evidence to the contrary other than people saying; "We hear you," and then nothing actually changes.)

The problem is that the shift in communication would be very challenging. Instances of Ion saying; "We made a mistake with Azerite," are taken about the same way as a titanforge: it feels good for a moment, but then you quickly return to the mountain of disappointment/displeasure/boredom/negativity/whatever.
It would take repeated "titanforges" and a lot of resilience for short-term abuse for Blizzard to change their culture, and again, I just don't think it's going to happen.

You can throughout this thread hear it in the tone of the MVPs--One even saying that by the time a lot of feedback reaches the devs it's far too late for them to actually do anything with it.

That's a problem.
I read this:

http://us.blizzard.com/en-us/company/about/b20/interviews.html#thirdInterview

and it reminded me of this:

https://www.amazon.com/Bull!@#$-Jobs-Theory-David-Graeber/dp/150114331X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1539985482&sr=8-1&keywords=bull%^-*+jobs
10/18/2018 10:36 AMPosted by Ythisens
Bashiok


I just can't. It has to come from someone of value.
These are all buzz-words people in PR and marketing use to sound hyper-involved with stuff. Basically what it boils down to is they're like paralegals. Nobody trusts them to do much of anything, but they write a lot of stuff and feel involved.

10/18/2018 09:07 AMPosted by Solarwynds
This is for Starcraft but should be similar:

Responsibilities
• Act as public-facing representative of StarCraft and communicate on behalf of the brand across multiple channels and at events.
• Drive the design and execution of North American English community development efforts.
• Manage communication plans and channels, striving for continuous improvement.
• Create communications (e.g., social posts, blogs) with high levels of quality and timeliness.
• Design and manage community development projects related to StarCraft II.
• Strategize and execute on reactive communications to players.
• Build relationships with community partners such as fan sites, influencers, players, teams, and volunteers.
• Create engagement opportunities at in-person and online events.
• Analyze and report on content performance data to drive continuous improvement, optimization, and innovation.
• Provide meaningful feedback to game teams on the community’s sentiment, concerns, and suggestions.
• Collaborate with global teammates.
• Ensure quality on behalf of the team and brand.

Requirements
• Bachelor’s Degree in Communications, Marketing, or related field or equivalent work experience
• A minimum of 5 years’ experience with brand communications, forums, and social media
• A minimum of 2 years’ experience with third party relationship management
• A minimum of 2 years’ experience with channel management, publishing calendars, reporting & analytics
• Staff coaching experience
• Familiar with project management and process improvement
• Able to travel, including international travel, and work long hours and weekends as needed

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