The New Headcanon Thread

Wyrmrest Accord
10/23/2018 11:08 AMPosted by Jakkø
That's why Baine hasn't left the Horde. That's why he hasn't simply lead his people into the Alliance, as he's occasionally been tempted to do.


I'd like to note that three incidents with the Alliance would make it incredibly hard for him to survive trying that, from his own people before anything Sylvanas might try. First, during the Centaur War, before anyone else came to Kalimdor they begged the Night Elves for shelter from the marauding centaur wiping them out. They begged for at least their children to be protected, so their race had a future. Flatly refused because Staghelm was a dickwad.

The Dwarves invaded mulgore, and were offended at the idea they weren't allowed to dig up somewhere they thought titan relics might be located.

The Alliance let loose their criminal soldiers with no real supervision on a civilian hunting camp, and tried to act like they weren't responsible for unleashing unsupervised criminals they brought to the battlefield in the first place on a bunch of civilians.

Baine may be friends with Anduin, but his people are not him. And he knows it. Why hasn't he left the Horde? Because the Horde is not the Warchief. The Horde is the people. And Sylvanas wouldn't even need to give an order to get constant heavy retaliation at his city on her behalf, if he turned his home into enemy territory. His people would go from secure in the west, to having no safe place to turn, the Alliance cannot possibly support an inland nation like his.

He doesn't turn to the Alliance because his people survive best with the Horde. He's most like Durotan, any personal qualms he may have, any disputes with the Warchief or their actions, his people come first. Their survival. He cares for the others, hurts at seeing them do what he considers wrong, but the other races aren't why his people stays with the Horde. His people are why he stays with the Horde.

As for headcanons...
10/24/2018 05:43 AMPosted by Opherial
This is why they almost never advance culturally or technologically without external help - every orc almost exclusively cares about what they can do now with the limited time they have.

I highly disagree on this part, the rest fits with my understanding. It's not that they never advance without help, it's that in every instance of an Orc race, they're not very far off when unmodified from an early bronze age (at the latest) stage civilization. Tribals who only barely figured out basic metallurgy, and simply haven't had much time to develop over thousands of years. They are biologically culturally and technologically behind even the simplest and most isolated of Troll tribes, while working together, until someone else comes in to uplift them. The Legion brought an amalgamation of countless combined metallurgic practices to create the best metal possible. Garrosh brought an improvement on that without fel magic, with his goblins and schematics.

I think that most of the Horde is relatively okay with Sylvanas so far, despite players wanting to stand against her early, the most you could say is that she was reckless and cost Horde lives. She has been pretty loyal to the Horde, she cast off her own city in a way that heavily damaged the Alliance, to focus on Kalimdor where most of the Horde lives, and she has been bringing in all sorts of allies who aren't much like her or her people, the only undead ally she made (in secret) being a small group of outcasts who wouldn't significantly increase her own position relative to the power of her allies.

This isn't the first cycle between the Light and Shadow. Our universe starts with the latest turning from Light, but the two have been absorbing all creation over and over again for longer than that. For longer than anything. They don't need to take turns, though the more one side takes over creation in a cycle change, the harder the pendulum will swing the other way when it's the other's turn. The Void Lords using a baby Titan to manifest, may or may not be specific to our universe, but the result would be nothing new to the cosmos. Void wins, then the Light returns, and maybe it wins, then the Void returns. Onwards into eternity. Everything we know comes from the time between victories, and it will be washed away like nothing whenever one of them takes over, subsumed then destroyed as the violent clashes bring a new universe into being.
Paladins can use and shape the Light like Green Lanterns.

Probably not lore-accurate but based off their animations, I don't think it is too far a stretch.

Azeroth has a longer orbit around its sun than Earth does and that is why every expansion (except Cata) is only 1 "year" when so much happens. If we were going off Earth calander, I think that too much happens to cram into such a short amount of time. Armies being built, outposts, troop movements, major threats being defeated, etc- it just seems like too much.
10/26/2018 07:42 AMPosted by Borgg
Azeroth has a longer orbit around its sun than Earth does and that is why every expansion (except Cata) is only 1 "year" when so much happens. If we were going off Earth calander, I think that too much happens to cram into such a short amount of time. Armies being built, outposts, troop movements, major threats being defeated, etc- it just seems like too much.


I like this. Biologically, ages would be by Azeroth time, so some issues wouldn't be changed, but still useful for making sense of the world.
Night elves and druids are very aware of and concerned with the discovery of the Drust. It represents a perversion of druidism and a skew towards death magic never before seen outside the Scourge. This fear had such potential to escalate, that had night elves not already taken a massive hit and the Kul Tirans dealt with the problem, they would have sent forces to deal with it. This would have created an international incident between the already paranoid peoples of Kul Tiras and the enigmatic Kaldorei that could have sabotaged the Alliance's efforts to reincorporate the island nation.

On the topic of the Drust, they are the "missing link" of humanity that connects them to vrykul. If you look at their buildings, they strike a remarkable resemblance to vrykul and titanic buildings in Stormheim. Not to mention their "barbaric" practices and natural instinct to fight first and ask questions later match their vrykul ancestors' typical behavior.

And on a less related headcanon, naga capture night elves and force convert them into more naga. Sometimes even entire vessels' crews are taken and all that returns is an empty ship. This has been happening since the Sundering and it is one of the reasons night elves stayed on Kalimdor.
10/26/2018 05:53 PMPosted by Loranaris
Night elves and druids are very aware of and concerned with the discovery of the Drust. It represents a perversion of druidism and a skew towards death magic never before seen outside the Scourge. This fear had such potential to escalate, that had night elves not already taken a massive hit and the Kul Tirans dealt with the problem, they would have sent forces to deal with it. This would have created an international incident between the already paranoid peoples of Kul Tiras and the enigmatic Kaldorei that could have sabotaged the Alliance's efforts to reincorporate the island nation.


On the flip side, several Kaldorei Druids are looking more deeply into the Drust's teachings. Though Malfurion does what he can to discourage such investigations, since the loss of Teldrassil the Kaldorei are less inclined to listen to the lauded Shan'do.
10/26/2018 06:03 PMPosted by Vanndrel
On the flip side, several Kaldorei Druids are looking more deeply into the Drust's teachings. Though Malfurion does what he can to discourage such investigations, since the loss of Teldrassil the Kaldorei are less inclined to listen to the lauded Shan'do.


I like that a lot too. With such dramatic upheaval in night elves' lives right now, many are exploring new identities, and a lot of druids are suddenly seeing the "darker" side of druidism that includes the balance of death. A small cult of "death" druids has sprung up among them.

I think this might have created a new character concept for me.
"The Forest is born, grows, and inevitably dies to facilitate new growth. Our civilization also follows this cycle. We died under Azshara, and now we die under the Shan'do. But the growth that comes after will make us stronger. Or it will die - choked on the vines of that which is stronger.

It is our duty to oversee that process."

~ Druids of Decay
Anduin's a closet shadowpriest and also he sleepwalks.

The two may be connected.
The rise of Saurok 'pirates' in Kul'tiras is proof that the species can work relatively well with other species, and is in fact due to our efforts on the Isle of Thunder.

With the Thunder King slain, the Zandalari scattered and the Shado-Pan crawling over the island snuffing out any threats, the Saurok, along with a handful of Zandalari survivors the 'Smallteeth' pressured into teaching them how to sail, fled the island on a flotilla of badly damaged vessels that survived the Shado-Pan Assault on the Thunder King's fortress.

Due to the damaged nature of the ships as well as the interference of Naga, Pirates and eating the Zandalari sailors after they had attempted to throw their Saurok 'passengers' over the side during a storm, the Saurok Smallteeth drifted at the mercy of the tides and winds until fortune finally favoured them and their last remaining ships crashed just to the south of Kul'tiras, the Saurok swimming the last leg to shore under their own power.

As the months passed and the world moved on from Pandaria and her troubles, and on to other, greater threats, the Saurok went from bedraggled survivors to a small, thriving colony located in a hidden cove filled with ruined ships and ancient plunder, nesting in limestone caves and surviving on rich seal-flesh and fish caught in the waters until a pirate vessel sailed into the cove, smugglers come to recover lost treasure.

After a tense stand-off, the Smallteeth's leader reached an accord with the Pirate captain. The Smallteeth Saurok's colony would be fortified, with firearms, bulwarks and whatever else the Pirates could provide that suited the Sauroks' combat style, and in exchange the reptilian warriors would stand with the Pirates as an elite aquatic combat force. Desiring only food and sanctuary for their developing broods rather than the gold and plunder that the Humans, Dwarves and Vulpera that stood with the Pirates of Kul'tiran demanded for their services, soon Saurok 'pirates' could be found standing under every flag and banner of Pirate that swarmed Kul'tiras's waters.
All life/nature magic is tuned down Light/holy magic.
Velen is a Discipline Priest, not a Holy one. His visions come from the Void, which is why he sees so many possible futures not just one. It's also why some of his people became Lightforged but those that followed Velen did not because he's never trusted pure cosmic forces so he rides that line.
When MoP launched, 10 out of the 12 playable non-pandaren races could become monks, implying that, in-universe, the way of the monk is a fairly easy art to pick up and eventually master. All it really takes is some physical capability and a willingness to learn.

So what keeps worgen and goblins from becoming monks? Besides the chronological issues stated by Blizzard, there's also philosophical issues.

When the Mogu ruled Pandaria, they did so through their principal philosophy - raw, overwhelming power. This is also why the Mogu forbade their pandaren slaves from using weapons - to keep power out of their hands. Thus, the way of the monk was born, not only as a means to work around the "no weapons" rule, but also as a means to subvert and ultimately defeat power, not only through cleverness, but also through the guiding principal of all monks - balance in all things.

Balance took on power, and balance won. THAT is the lesson of the Pandaren Revolution, the first lesson every monk must learn, and those races that can become monks are the ones that can wrap their heads around the concept.

Goblins and worgen can't. Or more accurately, won't.

Goblins believe in the power of both technology and money and, unlike their gnomish counterparts, aren't open-minded enough to consider other possibilities. The same is true of worgen - they are imbued with the raw power and ferocity of the wolf and seek to use it to their advantage. They've no interest in things like balance.

You see this in allied races too. As it currently stands, the only allied race that can't be monks is the Lightforged, who are far too zealous to believe in anything else except the raw power of the Light. Zandalari Trolls, much like their old Mogu allies, also believe in ruling through power and, even after severing their ties with the Mogu, can't or won't envision any other path. And while we don't know the full class list for Kul Tiran humans yet, it wouldn't surprise me if they couldn't be monks either, because who needs balance when you have the power of the sea itself at your beck and call?

These races, from the typical monk's point of view, are falling into the same trap that the Mogu did millennia ago - they arrogantly believe that power and power alone is the only path to victory.
"Class titles" we see among the draenei are not actually class titles but rather earned roles within draenei society, traditionally possessing certain abilities but not exclusively. An anchorite fulfills the societal role of the Priest (typically being Holy and maybe Discipline), but it doesn't mean it is exclusive to class: priest. A vindicator may be an armored warrior of the Light, but not every draenei paladin may be a Vindicator, and we've seen warrior vindicators (and if we look at the TCG, grain of salt I know, a priest and a shaman). There is no exclusivity, only what is usually so.

Considering this, I imagine both roles and others in draenei culture to require some sort of tests to take on them and to advance. As such, we see Paladin (and warrior) vindicators and Priest Anchorites most of all because thats how the respective trials are geared. Back on Argus we have seen tests built around the talents and abilities of arcanists; a display of Cunning (a puzzle), Mastery (combat), and Tenacity (surviving a gantlet of traps). An outsider can take such tests on, thus earning the titles and whatever responsibilities come with, but one has to present one's self and having a different set of skills may make one less suited to the tests one way or another.

I imagine tests to become a Vindicator to require displays of martial prowess and one's resolve predominantly. Conversely, Anchorites would likely be tested on the tenets of faith, trust and devotion to the Light, and likely the mending of wounds.

I put this here because I have generally seen a divide on whether Vindicator directly means Draenei Paladin or not.
One surprising consequence of the Horde's newfound relations with Zandalar is that Loa Worship has become more common among the Horde, and even more surprising, among non-trolls, as many Horde races have encountered Loa whose values who can identify with.

It began with Kimbul, the obscure Tiger Loa whose temple is based far on the Vol'dun coast. Many orcs, especially Mag'har, visited the temple, fascinated by the cat's talk of honor. It reminded them of the Orcish Honor of Old. Kimbul gladly accepted these new Orcish followers, some of the more devout of which had taken to getting stripe tattoos in honor of their new diety.

For another example, some goblins had taken a liking to Krag'wa - a stout Loa who believes in fiercely defending that which is yours. Such as your money. It helps that Krag'wa is easily one of the largest Loa - it makes the goblins feel a bit big themselves.

Most interestingly, some Forsaken have become fascinated with Bwonsamdi. Death is something they are intimately familiar with, and a few Forsaken have begun making deals with him, offering their very souls in service, in the hopes that the Death Loa is strong enough to save them from the hungering void that awaits all undead souls.
Lets talk Language and accents.

The Elves of Quel'thalas have a rather...odd accent, all things considered - it's vaguely British, same thing with the Void Elves, despite them being so distant from the Human Kingdoms, even in the past.

I propose that, since the closest contact with people who speak common used to be the countryside of Lordaeron, Eastwald, probably full of farmers and lower class traders, the elves that picked up Common did it through the country folk. You know, people who would speak in a long form drawl.

Like a reverse case of Country Drawl US vs Old Timey Brit accent, where in IRL, the Country drawl is a mutated form on the Brit accent, but in the Warcraft case, it's a reverse. Elves picked up the Drawl, and their own accent allowed it to morph into something less than a drawl over time - hence why Void Elves and some Blood Elves have a semi brit accent.

On the flip side, this also occasionally means you will run into one or two elves with a much rougher accent.

'Y'ALL'DVE'
Night elves are the way they are because their ancestry ties back to two things: Trolls that settled around the Well of Eternity and were thus influenced by its energies (which is strictly canon), and relations with Dryads. If both of these together are true, that would explain why Night Elves resemble Dryads so much, why night elf meat could be passed off as venison (according to Teldrassil Tenderloin), and further solidify their bond to Elune.

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