Checking Your Windows Hosts File

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Altered Windows hosts files may prevent game client installation, or cause issues with patching. The hosts file is a Windows system file that can override DNS and redirect URLs or IP addresses to different locations. A typical home internet user will not have a modified hosts file.

Checking for Modifications

  1. Navigate to c:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc.
  2. Open the hosts file with a text editor like notepad. Hosts will not have a file extension.
  3. Compare your hosts file with the Microsoft defaults listed below. If yours is different, it has been modified. Remove any lines that contain Blizzard URLs or addresses.
  4. Save the file.

Note: If your hosts file was modified, run a virus scan. Viruses and malware can modify the hosts file to try to redirect your computer to malicious websites.

Common Problematic Modifications

These modifications negatively affect Blizzard games. If you find them, remove them:

  • 127.0.0.1 eu.actual.battle.net
  • 127.0.0.1 us.actual.battle.net
  • 127.0.0.1 enGB.nydus.battle.net

Resetting the Hosts File to Microsoft Defaults

To reset the Hosts file back to the default, follow these steps:

  1. Navigate to c:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc
  2. Rename the Hosts file to "Hosts.old".
  3. Create a new default hosts file:
    1. Right-click an open space in the c:\Windows\System32\Drivers\Etc folder, select New, and click Text Document.
    2. Enter hosts for the filename and press Enter.
    3. Click Yes to confirm that the file name extension will not be .txt.
    4. Open the new Hosts file in a text editor, such as Notepad.
    5. Copy the following text to the file:

Please make a selection from the menu above.

Windows XP

# Copyright (c) 1993-1999 Microsoft Corp.
#
# This is a sample HOSTS file used by Microsoft TCP/IP for Windows.
#
# This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each
# entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should
# be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name.
# The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one
# space.
#
# Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual
# lines or following the machine name denoted by a '#' symbol.
#
# For example:
#
# 102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com # source server
# 38.25.63.10 x.acme.com # x client host
127.0.0.1 localhost

Windows Vista

# Copyright (c) 1993-2006 Microsoft Corp.
#
# This is a sample HOSTS file used by Microsoft TCP/IP for Windows.
#
# This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each
# entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should
# be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name.
# The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one
# space.
#
# Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual
# lines or following the machine name denoted by a '#' symbol.
#
# For example:
#
# 102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com # source server
# 38.25.63.10 x.acme.com # x client host
127.0.0.1 localhost
::1 localhost

Windows 7 and Windows 8

# Copyright (c) 1993-2006 Microsoft Corp.
#
# This is a sample HOSTS file used by Microsoft TCP/IP for Windows.
#
# This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each
# entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should
# be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name.
# The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one
# space.
#
# Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual
# lines or following the machine name denoted by a '#' symbol.
#
# For example:
#
# 102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com # source server
# 38.25.63.10 x.acme.com # x client host
# localhost name resolution is handle within DNS itself.
# 127.0.0.1 localhost
# ::1 localhost

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